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Hood, Otis A. (Otis Archer)

Otis A. Hood Papers

1941-1957
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1056
Depiction of Otis Hood for Boston School Board, 1949
Otis Hood for Boston School Board, 1949

A long-time leader in the Communist Party in Massachusetts, Otis A. Hood (1900-1983) was a frequent candidate for public office between the late 1930s and early 1950s. At a time of increasing repression, he stood openly for Communist principles, speaking regularly on the radio and at public forums. In 1954, he was one of several activists arrested for violating the state ban on the Communist Party, winning acquittal, and he was acquitted again after a second indictment in 1956 on charges of inciting the overthrow of the federal government.

The Hood papers are a slender reflection of Communist politics during the height of McCarthy-era repression. The collection centers around Otis Hood’s public espousal of Communist ideals as a candidate for public office in Boston, and particularly his runs for the city School Board in 1943 through 1949, but it includes fliers, handbills, and other materials relating to Communist-led campaigns relating to the war, housing, public transportation, and education, but most importantly, transcripts of radio broadcasts made by Hood during his political campaigns and relating to a variety of social issues.

Gift of Bruce Rubenstein via Eugene Povirk, Oct. 2018
Subjects
Boston (Mass.)--History--20th century
Communists--Massachusetts
Racism--Massachusetts
Schools--Massachusetts--Boston
World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
Hood, Frances A.
Lipshires, Sidney
Massachusetts. Special Commission to Study and Investigate Communism and Subversive Activities and Related Matters in the Commonwealth
ommunist Party of the United States of America (Mass.)
Types of material
Fliers (Printed matter)
Printed ephemera
Radio scripts
Horace Pierce and Son

Horace Pierce & Son Ledger

1828-1857
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 234

Starting out as a blacksmith in Royalston, Mass., in 1828, Horace Pierce established a successful pail manufacturory. Taking his son Milo as a partner, he employed a work force of eight by 1870, selling over $6,000 of pail annually with capital of nearly $3,500. Horace Pierce died in Royalston in 1883 at the age of 78.

This ledger includes records of work performed as a blacksmith (shoeing horses, fixing irons, mending sleighs, shovels, or chains, sharpening tools), records of manufacturing pails, forms of payment received (cash, labor, agricultural produce, wood, shoes, coal, and old iron), lists of customers, accounts of employees (monthly wages, charges for boarding, and days lost to work), and accounts of supplies purchased.

Subjects
Blacksmiths--Massachusetts--Royalston
Pails--Massachusetts--Royalston
Royalston (Mass.)--History
Contributors
Pierce, Horace, 1805-1883
Pierce, Milo, b. 1829
Types of material
Ledgers
Horrigan, Leonta G.

Leonta G. Horrigan Papers

ca.1936-1986
37 boxes 55.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 114

A member of the Massachusetts State College Class of 1936, Leonta Gertrude Horrigan was affiliated with UMass Amherst throughout her long career in academia. After receiving he MA from Smith College in 1942 for a thesis on DeQuincy and Milton, Horrigan taught creative writing, composition, among writing classes, to UMass undergraduates, and was frequently singled out as a favorite instructor on campus. In 1964, she was appointed Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and retired to emeritus status in 1986.

The Horrigan Papers contain nearly a half century record of instruction in writing education at UMass, with a wide array of other materials relating to Horrigan’s varied interest, events on campus, and to the evolution of the university in the post-war years.

Subjects
University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
Horrigan, Leonta G
Horsch, Annie C.

Annie C. Horsch Cookbook

1897-1941
1 vol. 0.2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 217 bd

Born in Germany in 1866, Annie C. Horsch worked for many years as a servant and housekeeper in the home of the Dummer family in Rowley, Mass. Listed as a domestic in the Rowley City Directories as early as 1888, Horsch began to work for the miller Nathaniel N. Dummer (1824-1907) and his wife Elizabeth (b. 1839) prior to 1900 and was retained well into the 1940s. Horsch died of cerebral arteriosclerosis in Newburyport on Jan. 23, 1956, at the age of 89.

Scrappy and well used, the Horsch cookbook was the working reference for a domestic employed by an old Rowley family, the Dummers. The cookbook consists primarily of recipes for breads and desserts, with a slight nod to healthy eating (including Graham Bread and “Health bread”) followed by a succession of pies, cakes, and puddings. The book includes recipes for Spider Johnny Cake; lemon, raisin, various minces (mock mince, pear mine, tomato mince), sour milk, rhubarb, cranberry, coconut, pineapple, and caramel pies; and then the cakes: dark cake, French cake, fruit cake, apple sauce cake, Harrison cake, chocolate cake, ribbon cake, Bangor cake, and marble cake, among many others.

Gift of Melinda McIntosh, Oct. 2008
Subjects
Bread
Cake
Cookbooks--Massachusetts--Rowley
Pies
Rowley (Mass.)--History
Types of material
Cookbooks
Howe Family

Howe Family Papers

1730-1955
7 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 019

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Howe family of Enfield and Dana, Massachusetts, including correspondence between family members, genealogies, account books and printed materials. Account books record transactions of various family members whose occupations included general storekeeper, minister, printer, postmaster, telephone exchange and gas-station owner, and document the transactions of community businesses and individuals, some of whom were women involved in the beginnings of the local palm leaf hat and mat industry.

Subjects
Bookkeeping--History--Sources
Enfield (Mass.)--Biography
Enfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
Enfield (Mass.)--History
Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Howe family--Genealogy
Moneylenders--Massachusetts--Enfield--History
Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
Swift River Valley (Mass.)--History
Swift River Valley (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
Howe, Donald W. (Donald Wiliam), 1982-1977
Howe, Edwin H., 1859-1943
Howe, Henry Clay Milton, b. 1823
Howe, John M.
Howe, John, 1783-1845
Howe, Theodocia Johnson, 1824-1898
Types of material
Account books
Business records
Deeds
Genealogies
Scrapbooks
Wills
Howes Brothers

Howes Brothers Photograph Collection

ca. 1882-1907
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 313

Alvah, Walter, and George Howes brothers traveled the Pioneer Valley of Massachusetts in the last two decades of the 19th century, taking photographs of the residents and documenting the customs, fashions, architecture, industry, technology, and economic conditions of rural New England.

The Howes collection includes 200 study prints selected from 20,000 negatives held by the Ashfield Historical Society.

Subjects
Massachusetts--History
Contributors
Howes, Alvah
Howes, George
Howes, Walter
Types of material
Photographs
Howes, Jeanne C., 1916-

Jeanne Howes Papers

1967-2006
2 boxes 0.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 471

Independent Melville scholar, Jeanne Howes proved that Herman Melville’s first book, Redburn, or, The Schoolmaster of Morning, was published anonymously in 1844. This collection contains her published articles and book about Melville, as well as a self-published work about Nathan and Seth Howes who were credited with creating the first American tented circus.

Also a poet, her papers include letters from Robert Francis, with whom she carried on a regular correspondence for nearly a decade, as well as unpublished typescripts of her own poems.

Subjects
Poetry
Contributors
Francis, Robert, 1901-1987
Howes, Jeanne C., 1916-
Howland family

Howland Family Papers

1727-1886 Bulk: 1771-1844
2 boxes 0.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 923

The Howland family of East Greenwich, R.I., figured prominently in New England Quakerism during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and contributed to the state’s public affairs. Brothers Daniel (1754-1834), an approved minister, and Thomas Howland (1764-1845), an educator, were active members of the Society during the tumultuous years between the 1780s and 1840s, caught up in the moral demands for a response to slavery and other social issues and in the divisions wrought by evangelical influences.

Centered largely on the lives of Thomas Howland, his brother Daniel, and Daniel’s son Daniel, the Howland collection is an important record of Quaker life in Rhode Island during trying times. As meeting elders, the Howlands monitored and contributed to the era’s major controversies, and the collection is particularly rich in discussions of the impact of slavery and the passionate struggle between Friends influenced by the evangelically-inclined Joseph John Gurney and the orthodox John Wilbur. Thomas’ complex response to his commitment to the antislavery cause and his fear of disrupting meeting unity is particularly revealing. Also of note is a series of responses from monthly meetings to queries on compliance with Quaker doctrine, obtained during the decade after the American Revolution.

Subjects
Antislavery movements--Rhode Island
East Greenwich (R.I.)--History
Peace movements--Rhode Island
Temperance--Rhode Island
Contributors
Bassett, William, 1803-1871
Brown, Moses, 1738-1836
Friends' Boarding School (Providence, R.I.)
Gurney, Joseph John, 1788-1847
Howland, Daniel
Howland, Daniel, 1754-1834
Howland, Thomas, 1764-1845
Moses Brown School
New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
Shearman, Abraham, 1777-1847
Society of Friends--Controversial literature
Society of Friends--History
Tobey, Samuel Boyd, 1805-1867
Wilbur, John, 1774-1856
Hrdlicka, Ales, 1869-1943

Ales Hrdlicka Collection

1995
1 box 2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 149

Fourteen panels used in a public exhibition depicting the life and work of the Czech-born American anthropologist Ales Hrdlicka through photographs, documents, and narrative.

Subjects
Hrdlicka, Ales, 1869-1943
Hubbard and Lyman

Hubbard and Lyman Daybook

1844-1847
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 237 bd

Partners who manufactured harnesses, saddles, and trunks in Springfield, Massachusetts. Includes the prices paid for harnesses, whips, trunks, valises, and a variety of repair jobs such as splicing, coupling, and repairing of the hoses of the Springfield Fire Department. Also contains method and form of payment (principally cash, but also wood, leather, and leather thread in exchange) and twenty pages of clippings with the names of Lyman’s daughters, Mary and Frances, written on them.

Subjects
Aaron P. Emerson Co. (Orland, Me.)
Barter--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
Harness making and trade--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
Harnesses--Prices--History
Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
Springfield (Mass.). Fire Dept
Trunks (Luggage)--Prices--History
Wages--Leatherworkers--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
Whips--Prices--History
Contributors
Hubbard and Lyman
Hubbard, Jason, b. 1815
Lyman, Moses, b. 1815
Types of material
Daybooks