The University of Massachusetts Amherst
Special Collections & University Archives
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Collecting area: Mass Agricultural College (1863-1931)

Chenoweth, Walter W. (Walter Winfred), b. 1872

Walter W. Chenoweth Papers

1918-1941
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 046
Depiction of Walter W. Chenoweth
Walter W. Chenoweth

Walter W. Chenoweth, the founder of the Horticultural Manufactures Department in 1918, the predecessor to the Food Science Department, was a key figure in the development of research and education in modern food science. Hired as a pomologist at Mass. Agricultural College in 1912, Chenoweth had no background in food science, but encouraged by Frank A. Waugh and supported by Frederick Sears, he developed a course of study from scratch, learning and standardizing many of techniques himself while teaching. His curriculum and the processes he and his students developed for preserving food contributed to easing the food shortages brought on by World War I. Under the aegis of the new department, Chenoweth initiated a program in community food preservation, instructing students and members of the public in canning and other techniques. In 1929-1930, he loaned his services to the Grenfell Mission in Newfoundland, setting up canneries and teaching the methods of food preservation to would-be colonizers in Newfoundland and Labrador. Faced with a dearth of solid literature in the field, he published a textbook, Food Preservation (1930), which was a standard text for many years. The University named the Food Science building in Chenoweth’s honor after it was built in 1965. Chenoweth retired in 1941 and died four years later at the age of 75 .

The Walter Chenoweth Papers includes many of Chenoweth’s published works on canning and food preservation including his 1930 text, Food Preservation, as well as a typescript text called How to Preserve Food, eventually published by Houghton Mifflin in 1945. Also in the collection are clippings and memorabilia from Chenoweth’s trips to Newfoundland while working at the Grenfell Mission and a set of glass lantern slides.

Subjects

University of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Food Science

Contributors

Chenoweth, Walter W. (Walter Winfred), 1872-
Clagg, Charles F.

Charles F. Clagg Photograph Collection

1930 June-July
1 folder 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: PH 016
Depiction of Three Manobo girls
Three Manobo girls

The entomologist Charles F. Clagg was born in Barnstable, Mass., in 1904 and received his bachelor of science degree from the Massachusetts Agricultural College in 1927. Although never able to complete his graduate degree, Clagg enjoyed a long and productive career in entomology. Listed as a graduate student at MAC in 1929-1930, Clagg took part in an extensive collecting trip to the Philippines in 1930 and 1931. Beginning in June 1930 near Calian in Davao del Sur (Mindanao), Clagg spent several months collecting flies in and around the active Mount Apo volcano, in the Lawa and Calian river valleys, and in the Lalun mountains, traveling to the eastern peninsula of Davao early in 1931. He remained in the Pacific region later in his career, working as an entomologist for the U.S. Navy.

The twenty photographs taken by Charles F. Clagg in 1930 document his entomological collecting trip to Davao, Mindanao, in the Philippines. Primarily personal in nature, rather than professional, they were taken on Clagg’s visit to a coconut plantation run by American expatriates Henry and George Pahl and illustrate the local sights in Davao, including work in harvesting coconuts and the production of copra, the production of Manilla hemp, a horse fight at Calian, and Manobos who came to the plantation trade. Also included are three photographs of Clagg’s quarters while collecting high in the Lalun Mountains. The captions provided by Clagg on the back of each photograph have been transcribed verbatim.

Subjects

Copra industry--Philippines--PhotographsDavao (Philippines)--PhotographsManobos (Philippine people)--PhotographsPahl, GeorgePahl, George AustinPahl, HenryPalms--PhotographsPhilippines--PhotographsPlantations--Philippines--Photographs

Contributors

Clagg, Charles F.

Types of material

Photographs
Clapp, Charles Wellington

Charles Wellington Clapp Papers

1882-1886
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050 C53

Born on Jan. 4, 1863, and raised in Montague, Mass., Charles Wellington Clapp entered Massachusetts Agricultural College as a freshman during the fall 1882. Shouldering the standard coursework in agriculture and engineering, Clapp graduated with the class of 1886 and went on to a career as a civil engineer in Greenfield, Mass.

Written by Clapp to family members, mostly his sister Mary, during his undergraduate years at MAC, the 31 letters in this collection provide a lighthearted and engaging glimpse into the academic work and extra-curricular activities of a typical early student at Mass Aggie. Noteworthy among these letters are early references to football being played at the college and an effective hand-drawn map of campus, both from 1882.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students

Contributors

Clapp, Charles Wellington

Types of material

Letters (Correspondence)Maps
Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873

Henry James Clark Papers

1865-1872
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 048
Depiction of Trichodina pediculus
Trichodina pediculus

The first professor of Natural History at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, Henry James Clark, had one of the briefest and most tragic tenures of any member of the faculty during the nineteenth century. Having studied under Asa Gray and Louis Agassiz at Harvard, Clark became an expert microscopist and student of the structure and development of flagellate protozoans and sponges. Barely a year after joining the faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College at its first professor of Natural History, Clark died of tuberculosis on July 1, 1873.

A small remnant of a brief, but important career in the natural sciences, the Henry James Clark Papers consist largely of obituary notices and a fraction of his published works. The three manuscript items include two letters from Clark’s widow to his obituarist and fellow naturalist, Alpheus Hyatt (one including some minor personal memories), and a contract to build a house on Pleasant Street in Amherst.

Subjects

Developmental biologyMassachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMassachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Veterinary ScienceProtozoans

Contributors

Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873Clark, Mary Young HolbrookHyatt, Alpheus, 1838-1902

Types of material

ContractsLetters (Correspondence)
Clark, Orton Loring

Orton Loring Clark Papers

1910-1922
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 047

Orton Loring Clark was an associate professor of botany and biology at the University of Massachusetts. After earning his B.A. in 1908 from the University, then the Massachusetts Agricultural College, Clark studied at the University of Strasbourg, where he earned his doctorate. He joined the faculty of his alma mater in 1913, specialized in plant physiology, and taught until his retirement in 1946. Known as a great teacher and fine artist, Clark was active in Amherst town politics. He passed away in 1965 at the age of 79.

Orton Loring Clark’s collection includes several notebooks of research notes, data, and hand-drawn field diagrams. The notebooks date from his student years in Germany to his first several years on the faculty at the Massachusetts Agricultural College. The collection also includes one letter from 1922.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMassachusetts Agricultural College. Botany Department

Contributors

Clark, Orton Loring
Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers

1814-2003 Bulk: 1844-1886
14.75 linear feet
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
Depiction of William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

Agricultural colleges--Japan--HistoryAgricultural colleges--Massachusetts--HistoryAgriculturists--JapanAgriculturists--MassachusettsAmherst (Mass.)--HistoryAmherst College--FacultyAmherst College--Students--CorrespondenceHokkaido (Japan)--HistoryHokkaid¯o Daigaku--HistoryHokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--HistoryJapan--Relations--United StatesMassachusetts Agricultural College--HistorySapporo N¯ogakk¯o--HistorySapporo N¯ogakk¯o. PresidentT¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--HistoryUnited States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865United States--Relations--JapanUniversität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

DrawingsPhotographsRealiaScrapbooks
Cook, Allen B.

Allen B. Cook Papers

1893-1899
2 boxes, 2 OS framed photographs 2 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050/6 1896 C66

Born June 27, 1875 in Petersham, Massachusetts, Allen Bradford Cook graduated from Massachusetts Agricultural College as a member of the class of 1896. Cook was a member of the MAC Shakespearean Club, Young Men’s Christian Association, Washington Irving Literary Society, and the Clark Cadets Band. Immediately upon graduation, Cook began a career with facets as a landscape gardener, farm manager, tree warden, and state park supervisor. He was a life-long member of the Grange, active on both the state and national level, and helped to revitalize several Connecticut chapters. Cook met his wife, Emma Louise Shepardson, through her brother and Cook’s college friend, William Shepardson. Allen and Emma married on July 23, 1899, and had five children. Allen Cook died May 24, 1965 at his home in West Hartford, Connecticut.

The Cook papers include three oversized photographs of the MAC class of 1896, Shakespearean Club, and the Clark Cadets Band; Cook’s wooden flute and piccolo from his time in the Clark Cadets; two MAC wool felt pillow covers; Cook’s academic reports; and a large set of ephemera, including material from the Shakespearean Club and programs and cards from commencement, class day and military exercises, dances and banquets, and various oratory contests.

Gift of Barbara Goodwin, June 2021

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students

Types of material

Ephemera
Cook, Maurice E.

Maurice E. Cook Papers

1893-1921 Bulk: 1893-1895
1 box .25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 050/6 C66

Maurice Elmer Cook: studio portrait, Massachusetts Agricultural College, 1895

Born in Marlborough in 1876, Maurice Elmer Cook moved to Shrewsbury at the age of two, when his father, Herbert, purchased property on Floral Street for his market gardening and greenhouse flower and vegetable business. Maurice Cook stayed in the family business, and joined the Massachusetts Agricultural College class of 1897 to further his education in agriculture and market gardening. He worked at the plant house while attending MAC, and often took trips with classmates to hike local fields and ranges in the Pioneer Valley area to collect specimens. Cook was a member of the College Shakespeare Club, the YMCA, the Natural History Society, the Washington Irving Literary Society, and Sergeant in Battalion Org, Company A on campus. He roomed with Harry T. Edwards, of Chesterfield, in South College his first year, and in North College with Charles Adams Peters, from Greendale, for his second and third years. Cook left college early, in November 1895, on account of rheumatism, and did not return. After a trip to Pasadena, CA for his health, Cook returned to Shrewsbury, where he would live and work for the rest of his life. He built a new property and greenhouses there after his 1906 marriage to Carrie Harrington. Both died in Shrewsbury in 1931, leaving behind their three daughters, Gertrude, Elizabeth (class of 1934), and Florence.

The Cook Papers present a detailed view into the daily life and activities of an early MAC student, as well as a look into the infrastructure and organization of the MAC campus. Cook wrote home regularly, and the over 80 letters from his two and half years at the college offer significant coverage of his classes and studies, his living arrangements and financial needs, activities on campus and in Amherst, natural and agricultural locales, travel logistics for students, and updates on MAC buildings. In addition to the rich set of correspondence, the collection includes a small but unique set of photographs of MAC grounds and students, additional photographs taken by Cook, several MAC produced postcards, and Cook’s 1894 College Shakespearean Club certificate.

Gift of Kenneth Lever, October 2019

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--AlumniMassachusetts Agricultural College--Students

Types of material

CorrespondencePhotographs
Crampton, Guy C.

Guy C. Crampton Papers

1912-1942
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 052
Depiction of Guy Crampton
Guy Crampton

Guy Chester Crampton was an insect morphologist who taught at the University from 1911 until his retirement in 1947. Crampton earned his B.A. from Princeton in 1904, his M.A. from Cornell in 1905, and a Ph.D. from the University of Berlin in 1908, then began his professorship at the University, where he was a dedicated teacher and active researcher. A life-long bachelor, Crampton died from a heart attack in 1951.

The Guy C. Crampton Papers include published articles by Crampton, including a guide to the insects of Connecticut, published in 1942, as well as Crampton’s lecture notes for one of his courses in the Department of Entomology.

Subjects

Entomology--Study and teachingUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Entomology

Contributors

Crampton, Guy C
Cutter, Frederick A.

Frederick A. Cutter Papers

1902-1996 Bulk: 1902-1914
6 boxes 4 linear feet
Call no.: FS 090

A member of the Massachusetts Agricultural College class of 1907, Frederick A. Cutter participated in football, basketball, and baseball as a student, and was a member of Phi Sigma Kappa fraternity.

The Cutter collection contains photographs of the 1907 football team, the 1906 and 1907 members of Phi Sigma Kappa, and it includes a uniform from the M.A.C. basketball team, 1907, Massachusetts pennants and banners, a Lowell High School sweater from 1902, and early M.A.C. football equipment, including cleats and a nose guard.

Subjects

Caruthers, John TLivers, Susie DMassachusetts Agricultural College--BasketballMassachusetts Agricultural College--FootballMassachusetts Agricultural College--StudentsMassachusetts Agricultural College. Class of 1907Phi Sigma Kappa (Massachusetts State College)

Contributors

Cutter, Frederick A

Types of material

PhotographsRealiaSports uniforms