The University of Massachusetts Amherst
Robert S. Cox Special Collections & University Archives Research Center
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Collections: G

Goldman, Sheldon

Sheldon Goldman Papers

ca. 1965-2020
18 boxes 22.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 204

An accomplished and distinguished scholar of politics and the federal judiciary, Sheldon Goldman is also one of the longest-serving faculty members at the University of Massachusetts, having taught in the department of political science (known as the department of government until the early 1970s) from 1965 until his retirement in 2020. He earned his bachelor’s degree from New York University and his master’s degree and Ph.D. from Harvard. Goldman is known and lauded as much for his influential research and writings on federal courts, the politics of federal judicial selection, and constitutional politics, as for his teaching and mentorship of his students. Among his honors are several awards for outstanding teaching and the Chancellor’s Medal. He is the author of Picking Federal Judges: Lower Court Selection from Roosevelt Through Reagan and many other books and articles and has been interviewed on national news programs and in major publications.

The Goldman Papers document Goldman’s intellectual and pedagogical life and contributions as well as the evolution of UMass Amherst’s political science department. The collection includes correspondence, research notes, and administrative materials, along with copies of Goldman’s own publications and publications in which he is interviewed or quoted.

Gift of Sheldon Goldman

Subjects

University of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Political Science

Types of material

ArticlesCorrespondenceMemorandumsResearch (documents)
Goldspinner, Jay

Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection

1974-2012
1 box 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 909

1977 Spring Equinox cover of WomenSpirit

All social change and cultural movements have their associated resources for the exchange of information, ideas, stories, and art. Particularly in the women’s movement, the effort to create newsletters, journals, and other forms of information dissemination was a proactive step taken to assert women’s stories and to locate the power of the press within women-run communities. These periodicals, both large and small in scale, reveal the ways women connected to each other and to larger spiritual and cultural concepts. Local artist, activist, and feminist Jay Goldspinner was engaged with many of these communities, particularly those characterizing the spiritual elements of the women’s liberation and feminist movements, and collected and saved their periodicals. Her collection includes journals focusing on feminist linguistics, goddess myths and spirituality, Wiccan and witch traditions, progressive politics, and women’s spirituality and community in local and international settings. Each is a unique window into discourses of women’s history, feminist movements, and social change work.

The Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection consists of issues of feminist and progressive periodicals, journals, and newsletters from four decades. The titles represented include Always in Season, Goddessing, The Lonesome Node, The People’s Voice of Franklin County, Themis/Thesmophoria, Wicked Word, and an almost complete run, including the two indexes, of the seminal magazine of feminist spirituality, WomenSpirit.

Subjects

Feminism--PeriodicalsFranklin County (Mass.) --PeriodicalsGoddess religion--PeriodicalsNeopaganism--PeriodicalsSpiritual feminism--PeriodicalsWicca--PeriodicalsWitchcraft--PeriodicalsWomen and spiritualism--PeriodicalsWomen's rights and spiritualism--Periodicals

Types of material

Periodicals
Gonic Friends Meeting

Gonic Friends Meeting Records

1982-2003
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 G665

Quaker worship in Rochester, New Hampshire, began in 1742 under the care of Dover Monthly Meeting, becoming the Pine Grove Worship Group by 1846. After the meetinghouse was moved to the Gonic neighborhood of Rochester in about 1862, the name of the meeting was changed to Gonic. Gonic became a preparative meeting in 1950 and was finally set off from Dover as a monthly meeting in 1981.

The scant records of Gonic Friends Meeting consist solely of newsletters: one run from Gonic in the late 1980s and another from the West Epping Preparative Meeting from 1982-1996.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017

Subjects

Quakers--New HampshireRochester (N.H.)--Religious life and customsSociety of Friends--New Hampshire

Contributors

New England Yearly Meeting of FriendsWest Epping Preparative Meeting of Friends

Types of material

Newsletters
Goodale, Hubert Dana, 1879-1968

Hubert Dana Goodale Papers

1918-1978
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 918
Brass mouse head
Brass mouse-head stencil used in genetics work at Mount Hop Farm

An applied geneticist associated with Massachusetts Agricultural College and Mount Hope Farm, Hubert Dana Goodale made important contributions in poultry and dairy science.

The Goodale Papers contain correspondence written to Goodale, primarily by his friends and colleagues in poultry science, Al Lunn (Oregon Agricultural College), Loyal F. Payne (Kansas State), and John C. Graham (Mass. Agricultural College). Mixing both personal and professional content, the letters touch on academic life in post-World War I period and a variety of issues in poultry husbandry and genetics.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMount Hope Farm (Williamstown, Mass.)Poultry--BreedingPoultry--Genetics

Contributors

Graham, John G.Lunn, A. G. (Alfred Gunn), 1883-Payne, Loyal F. (Loyal Frederick), 1889-1970Prentice, E. Parmalee (Ezra Parmalee), 1863-1955

Types of material

Stencils
Goodell, Henry Hill

Henry Hill Goodell Papers

ca.1855-1900
7 boxes 3.5 linear feet
Call no.: RG 3/1 G
Depiction of Henry H. Goodell, ca.1883
Henry H. Goodell, ca.1883

The son of a missionary based in Constantinople, Henry Hill Goodell was born on May 20, 1839. After graduating from Amherst College in 1862, Goodell saw Civil War service with the 25th Connecticut Infantry in the Department of the Gulf, returning to New England to accept a position as Professor of Modern Languages at the newly-formed Massachusetts Agricultural College when it opened in 1867. Over the next four decades, Goodell taught a wide range of subjects, including military tactics, natural science, and elocution, and became its first librarian, before becoming President of the College from 1886 to 1905. As President, Goodell oversaw remarkable changes, including the admission of the first women and African American students, the first offering of electives in the curriculum, the development of the Experiment Station, and Extension Services, and the awarding of the first graduate degrees. Goodell died in April 1905.

The Goodell papers are a faint reflection of one of the key figures in the history of Massachusetts Agricultural College. The bulk of the collection consists of lectures given by Goodell in courses he offered at MAC, however there are a handful of items from his student days at Amherst College, his Civil War service, and a few items relating to the period of his presidency.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--HistoryMassachusetts Agricultural College--PresidentsUnited States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865United States. Army--Connecticut Infantry Regiment, 25th (1862-1863)
Goodnoff, Solomon

Solomon Goodnoff Collection

ca.1960-1980
4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1107
Depiction of Sol Goodnoff
Sol Goodnoff

A pioneer in television commercials and the use of special effects in the advertising film industry, Solomon Goodnoff was born in New York in 1923. After service in the Pacific during the Second World War, Goodnoff established a career as a film producer and director that resulted in international recognition for his television commercial work. Between the late 1940s and 1980s, he produced memorable spots that included the Maxwell House singing percolator, the Purina Cat Chow dancing cat, and the Budweiser Clydesdales. He was equally creative in developing specialized tools for the television industry, including a master antenna television system in the 1950. A Clio Award winner, he was also recognized with awards from the Directors Guild of America and film festivals at Cannes, Chicago, and New York. After moving to the Bekshires in the 1970s, Goodnoff continued to commute to Manhattan to work on special projects for Tulchin Studios, but he became known locally for his horticultural activities, serving as a trustee of the Berkshire Botanical Gardens and hosting a local radio program on gardening. He died in his home in Plainfield, Mass., in 2003, aged 80.

The collection contains videotape copies of many of Sol Goodnoff’s best known commercials, along with story boards, selected examples of his awards, and examples of specialized equipment used in producing spots for his clients.

Gift of Samuel Fries, Nov. 2019

Subjects

Television commercials

Types of material

Videotapes
Goodwin, Marcellus H.

Marcellus H. Goodwin Scrapbook

1841-1879
1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 484 bd
Depiction of Fashion plate
Fashion plate

In the early 1870s, twenty year-old Marcellus H. Goodwin was listed as a music teacher in city directories for Newburyport, Mass., residing at 32 Federal Street in the home of his father, Abel L. Goodwin. In later years, Marcellus worked as an upholsterer, but died died prematurely in 1883.

The Goodwin scrapbook is a typical production of the period in which the pages in a bound volume (in this case containing work records from 1841) are pasted over with newsclippings, mostly from the early 1870s. Goodwin favored poetry, aphorisms, and brief tales — sometimes humorous, but other times including curious facts — which, as far as can be discerned, were clipped from the Boston Courier and Newburyport Herald. Goodwin also pasted in three colorful fashion plates, a small series of illustrations of buildings at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition, and an original poem, “A short sermon.”

Subjects

Newburyport (Mass.)--History--19th century

Types of material

Scrapbooks
Gordon, Ann

Ann Gordon Papers

1986-1989
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 016

Ann Gordon served as the editor of the Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton papers as a member of African American Studies department from 1982 until the project’s conclusion in 1989. While at the University, Gordon, along with John Bracey, Joyce Berkman, and Arlene Avakian planned a conference discussing the history of African American Women voting from the Cady Stanton’s meeting at Seneca Falls to the Voting Rights Act. The conference, called the African American Women and the Vote Conference, was held in 1988.

The collection is comprised of proposals, reports, meeting transcripts, and correspondence from Gordon’s work planning the 1988 African American Women and the Vote Conference. Also included is preliminary work by Gordon to organize the papers given at the conference into book form.

Subjects

African American womenUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--FacultyUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Afro-American Studies

Contributors

Gordon, Ann
Gould, Thomas

Thomas Gould, A list of the names of publick Friends, who have visited New England

1838
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 903 bd

Born in Middletown, R.I., on May 25, 1730, Thomas Gould was part of an extended Quaker family in Newport County and descendant of one of the first Quaker converts in Rhode Island. Enjoying success as a “mechanic” and farmer, according to Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island (1908), he married Alice Chase of Portsmouth in March 1757 and raised a large family of five boys and five girls. Gould died on May 3, 1795.

This slender volume includes a chronological record visits to New England by Public Friends: Quakers who were considered to have a special gift in prayer or public speaking and who often traveled widely to minister.

Subjects

Quakers--New England

Types of material

Booklets
Gourreau de La Proustière, Philippe, 1611-1694

Conclave d'Alexandre vii, Revué, Corrigé, et Augmenté de Beaucoup par...

ca.1658
1 volume, 351p. 0.2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 436 bd

On April 7, 1655, after a conclave of 80 days, Fabio Chigi was elected to succeed Innocent X as Pope. Taking the name Alexander VII, Chigi was initially viewed as an opponent of papal nepotism, however little progress was made. He served as pope until his death on May 22, 1667.

Bound in 18th century leather with an prefatory letter by the Prieur Gourreau, this manuscript was apparently intended for publication and may be an 18th century transcription of a presumably earlier manuscript. Editions of the Le Conclave d’Alexandre VII, ou Relation véritable de tout ce qui s’est passé et négocié au Conclave tenu à Rome depuis le 17 janvier jusqu’au 7 avril 1655 au sujet de l’élection du cardinal Fabio Chigi appeared in 1666 and 1667.

Subjects

Alexander VII, Pope, 1599-1667Popes--Election

Contributors

Gourreau de La Proustière, Philippe, 1611-1694