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In addition to Butterfield, faculty before WWI  included professors Newell Sims, James Cutler, John Phelan, Joseph Novitski and John Skinner.  Like Butterfield, all were activists in the progressive movement.  Newell Sims, for example, left Massachusetts for the University of Florida where, in 1920, his house was raided by Department of Justice representatives in search of “radical” literature.  Various tracts advocating racial and class equality were discovered, and he was forced to resign his faculty position.  In addition to Butterfield, faculty before WWI  included professors Newell Sims, James Cutler, John Phelan, Joseph Novitski and John Skinner.  Like Butterfield, all were activists in the progressive movement.  Newell Sims, for example, left Massachusetts for the University of Florida where, in 1920, his house was raided by Department of Justice representatives in search of “radical” literature.  Various tracts advocating racial and class equality were discovered, and he was forced to resign his faculty position. 
-The modern era of Sociology at UMass began with Henry Korson’s arrival from Yale in 1944. At this time the University still had fewer than 1000 students. Korson became the head and only member of a new freestanding department of Sociology.  Within a few years John Manfredi, Edwin Driver and T.O. Wilkinson joined Korson, and these four formed the core of the Department until the explosive growth of Sociology that began in the early 1960s. +The modern era of Sociology at UMass began with Henry Korson’s arrival from Yale in 1944. At this time the University still had fewer than 1000 students. Korson became the head and only member of a new freestanding department of Sociology.  Within a few years John Manfredi, [[d:driver-edwin-d|Edwin Driver]] (the first African American member of the UMass faculty), and T.O. Wilkinson joined Korson, and these four formed the core of the Department until the explosive growth of Sociology that began in the early 1960s.
Between 1963 and 1974, faculty size increased from 10 to 31, including a number of people who were already or became distinguished scholars.  Among these were Milton Gordon, Lewis Killian, Charles Page, Alice Rossi and Peter Rossi (both to become ASA Presidents), Hans Speier, William J. Wilson, and  Jay Demerath, who came from Wisconsin as chairperson. Under the directorship of Doug Anderton, the Department's Social and Demographic Research Institute (SADRI ) continues on the path blazed by Pete Rossi, and even earlier by Kenyon Butterfield, with the mandate to carry out empirical and applied policy research on issues of broad public concern (see http://www.umass.edu/sadri).  The Demerath era of the Department was capped in 1983 when the NRC report on graduate programs ranked UMass sociology  18th in the nation, eleventh among public universities. Between 1963 and 1974, faculty size increased from 10 to 31, including a number of people who were already or became distinguished scholars.  Among these were Milton Gordon, Lewis Killian, Charles Page, Alice Rossi and Peter Rossi (both to become ASA Presidents), Hans Speier, William J. Wilson, and  Jay Demerath, who came from Wisconsin as chairperson. Under the directorship of Doug Anderton, the Department's Social and Demographic Research Institute (SADRI ) continues on the path blazed by Pete Rossi, and even earlier by Kenyon Butterfield, with the mandate to carry out empirical and applied policy research on issues of broad public concern (see http://www.umass.edu/sadri).  The Demerath era of the Department was capped in 1983 when the NRC report on graduate programs ranked UMass sociology  18th in the nation, eleventh among public universities.
s/sociology.txt · Last modified: 2016/06/06 05:53 by rscox
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