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Akin, Ebenezer, Jr.

Ebenezer Akin Account Book

1842-1869
1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 220 bd

A merchant, town clerk, part-owner of many ships, and involved citizen, Ebenezer Akin lived nearly all of his 87 years in the town of Fairhaven, Mass.

This miscellaneous personal ledger includes documentation of Ebenezer Akin’s work as town clerk and includes accounts for ships he may have owned, entries made as an estate executor, accounts of expenditures for clothing and incidentals, and accounts of lot purchases and loans. The volume also contains genealogical information about the Blossom family of Bridgewater and the family of Benjamin and Eunice Akin, Ebenezer’s great-grandfather.

Acquired from Charles Apfelbaum, 1987

Subjects

Akin, Benjamin, 1715-1802Akin, EuniceBlossom familyClothing and dress--Prices--Massachusetts--FairhavenFairhaven (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th centuryFairhaven (Mass.)--Politics and government--19th centuryHesper (Bark)Merchants--Massachusetts--FairhavenNapoleon (Ship)Shipowners--Massachusetts--FairhavenShipping--Massachusetts--FairhavenWilliam Rotch (Ship)Winthrop (Bark)

Contributors

Akin, Ebenezer, 1816-

Types of material

Account booksGenealogiesInventories of decedents estates
Albertson, Dean, 1920-

Dean Albertson Oral History Collection

1975-1977
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 224

A long-time faculty member at UMass Amherst, Dean Albertson was an historian of the twentieth century United States with a specialty in oral history. A veteran of the Second World War, Albertson received his BA from University of California Berkeley (1942) and doctorate from Columbia (1955), joining the Department of History at UMass in 1965 after several years at Brooklyn College. The author of books on Dwight Eisenhower, Claude Wickard (Franklin Roosevelt’s Secretary of Agriculture), and the student movements of the 1960s, Albertson was interested throughout his career in new methods in research and teaching history. He died at his home in Longmeadow, Mass., on March 31, 1989, at the age of 68.

Dean Albertson’s History 384 class at UMass Amherst, required students to conduct oral histories relating to a theme in contemporary U.S. history chosen each year. Between 1975 and 1977, Albertson’s students interviewed social activists of the 1960s and early 1970s, participants and observers in the North End riots of 1975 in Springfield, Massachusetts, and war and nuclear power resisters. The collection includes transcripts of 15 interviews conducted during this period, as well as the students’ papers, which put the transcripts into context.

Subjects

Antinuclear movement--MassachusettsCivil rights--Massachusetts--Hampden CountyDemonstrations--Massachusetts--ChicopeeHistory--Study and teaching (Higher)--Massachusetts-- AmherstPolice shootings--Massachusetts--SpringfieldPolitical activists--Massachusetts--InterviewsPrison riots--New York (State)--atticaPuerto Ricans--Massachusetts--SpringfieldRiots--Massachusetts--SpringfieldSelma-Montgomery rights March, 1965.Springfield (Mass.)--Race relationsSpringfield (Mass.)--Social conditionsVenceremos BrigadeVietnamese Conflict, 1961-1975--Protest movements -- Massachusetts--SpringfieldWelfare rights movement--Massachusetts--SpringfieldWestover Air Force Base (Mass.)

Types of material

Oral histories
Aldrich family

Aldrich Family Papers

1907-1992
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 398

Mark Bartlett Aldrich was employed for many years at the Montague Rod and Reel Co. in Montague City. His grandfather, Eugene Bartlett, was the founder of the firm, which made split-bamboo fishing rods. He owned and operated Aldrich’s New England store from 1948 until selling it in 1962. Aldrich then sold cars for Spenser Brothers Ford in Northfield until he and his wife Edith moved to Florida in 1964.

The collection consists primarily of family records relating to the wedding, anniversaries, and funerals of Edith and Mark Aldrich. The Aldrich Family Papers are organized into three series: Wedding and Anniversaries, Funeral and Legal, and Personal.

Subjects

Montague (Mass.)--Social life and customs

Contributors

Aldrich family
Alford Marble Works

Alford Marble Works Records

1870-1873
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 649 bd

Beginning in the early nineteenth century, the small town of Alford in far southwestern Massachusetts was the site of significant marble quarrying operations. Highly profitable for several decades, the quarries began to decline in profitability by mid-century when new sites became accessible by rail. By the early 1870s, the Alford Marble Works stood as one of the last quarries in the region to remain active.

The Alford Marble Works ledger includes pay and work records for quarrymen during its last years of operation. Although the Marble Works is sometimes recorded as suspending activity in 1872, it is clear from these records that their work continued through the end of 1873.

Subjects

Gravestones--MassachusettsMarble industry and trade--Massachusetts

Contributors

Alford Marble WorksAssociation for Gravestone Studies

Types of material

Account books
Allaway, Roger

Roger Allaway Collection

1941-2010
9 boxes 13.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 754
Depiction of Roger Allaway
Roger Allaway

The journalist and writer, Roger Allaway is one of the preeminent historians of soccer in North America. Born in New York City in 1945, Allaway graduated from Ohio Wesleyan University and worked in newspapers for over 30 years, including stints in Detroit, Toledo, and Philadelphia. From 2007, he was an historian at the National Soccer Hall of Fame. Allaway is author or co-author of numerous articles and books, including The Encyclopedia of American Soccer History (2001); The United States Tackles the World Cup (2002, updated 2011); Rangers, Rovers and Spindles (2005), and Corner Offices and Corner Kicks (2009).

The Allaway collection includes a variety of materials collected and used by Allaway in the course of his research. In addition to some research notes and a suite of books on the history of the game, the collection includes nearly 100 VHS tapes of international matches played by the men’s and women’s national teams, a selection of media guides from professional and national teams (1990s-2010), and photocopies of the exceptionally scarce Bill Graham Guides (1948-1972) and American Soccer League News (1941-1960).

Gift of Roger Allaway, Oct. 2012

Subjects

Soccer--History

Contributors

American Soccer LeagueMajor League Soccer (Organization)

Types of material

Videotapes
Allen, Theodore W., 1919-2005

Theodore W. Allen Papers

1946-2005
47 boxes 64 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1021
Part of: Jeffrey B. Perry Collection
Depiction of Theodore W. Allen
Theodore W. Allen

An anti-white supremacist, working class intellectual and activist, Theodore W. “Ted” Allen was one of the most important thinkers on race and class in the twentieth century. He developed his pioneering class struggle-based analysis of “white skin privilege” beginning in the mid-1960s; authored the seminal two-volume The Invention of the White Race in the 1990s; and consistently maintained that the struggle against white supremacy was central to efforts at radical social change in the United States. Born in Indianapolis, Indiana, Allen was raised in Kentucky and West Virginia, where he was “proletarianized” by the Great Depression. A member of the American Federation of Musicians and the United Mine Workers, and a member of the Communist Party, Allen moved to Brooklyn after injuring his back in the mines, and spent the last fifty years of his life at various jobs including factory work, teaching, the post office, and the Brooklyn Public Library. In the 1960s, having broken from the Communist Party, Allen set out on his own independent research course. Inspired by the work of W. E. B. Du Bois he wrote on the “white blindspot” and “white skin privilege” and began what became forty years of work focused on white supremacy as the principal retardant of class consciousness among European-American workers. Over his last thirty years, Allen wrote hundreds of published and unpublished articles and letters challenging white supremacy, capitalist rule, sexism, and U.S. Imperialism, as well as numerous poems.

The Theodore W. Allen Papers are a comprehensive assemblage of correspondence, published and unpublished writings, audio and video materials, and research by one of the major theorists on race and class of the twentieth century. The Papers offer important insights on the Old and New Left and their relation to the labor and Civil Rights/Black Liberation Movements and have much to offer students, scholars, researchers, and activists.

Gift of Jeffrey B. Perry, May 2018

Subjects

Communists--New York (State)Historians--New York (State)Labor movementRaceRacism

Contributors

Ignatiev, NoelSojourner Truth Organization

Types of material

Photographs
Allens Neck Monthly Meeting of Friends

Allen's Neck Monthly Meeting Records

1990-2010
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 902 A454

Desiring a more convenient place of worship in 1758, Quakers in Allen’s Neck, Mass., built a meetinghouse on a hill overlooking Buzzards Bay, six miles from the Apponegansett Meeting House of their parent meeting, Dartmouth Monthly. A relatively small worship group, the meeting was designated the West Preparative Meeting under Dartmouth in 1813, but after experiencing modest growth during the mid-twentieth century, they were formally set off as a monthly meeting in 1956.

The sparse records for Allen’s Neck Monthly Meeting consist of a broken run of newsletters with three annual directories and a brief run of State of the Society reports, all from the 1990s.

Gift of New England Yearly Meeting of Friends, April 2017

Subjects

Dartmouth (Mass.)--Religious life and customsQuakers--MassachusettsSociety of Friends--Massachusetts

Contributors

New England Yearly Meeting of Friends

Types of material

Newsletters
Allman, Timothy

Timothy Allman Papers

1976-1983
5 boxes 2.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 060

Journalist, news editor, and author of Unmanifest Destiny: Mayhem and Illusion in American Foreign Policy — From the Monroe Doctrine to Reagan’s War in El Salvador (1984).

Includes notes on observations and interviews, background material including press releases, reports, transcripts of speeches and congressional committee hearings testimony, and articles and pamphlets that concern El Salvador, Guatemala, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, Honduras, Belize, and Panama, and focus on the Church, guerrillas, dissent, terrorism, and foreign policies of presidents Jimmy Carter and Ronald Reagan.

Subjects

Central America--Foreign relations--United StatesEl Salvador--History--1979-1992Guatemala--History--1945-1982Honduras--History--1982-Nicaragua--History--1979-1990United States--Foreign relations--Central America

Contributors

Allman, Timothy
Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union. New England Joint Board

ACTWU New England Joint Board Records

1974-1987
8 boxes 12 linear feet
Call no.: MS 241

Records of the New England Joint Board of the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union include union administration files, company files, and publications. Company files document interactions between the union and companies such as Best Coat Co.; Healthtec, Inc.; Image Wear; M & M Pants Co.; Soloff & Son, Inc.; and Wear Well Trouser Co.

Subjects

Clothing trade--Labor unions--New EnglandLabor unions--New EnglandTextile workers--Labor unions--New England

Contributors

Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union
Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Boston Joint Board

ACWA Boston Joint Board Records

1926-1979
8 linear feet
Call no.: MS 002

The Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America originated from a split in the United Garment Workers in 1914 and quickly became the dominant force for union in the men’s clothing industry, controlling shops in Boston, Baltimore, Chicago, and New York. The Boston Joint Board formed at the beginning of the ACWA and included locals from a range of ethnic groups and trades that comprised the industry. It coordinated the activities and negotiations for ACWA Locals 1, 12, 102, 149, 171, 172, 173, 174, 181,183, 267, and 335 in the Boston area. In the 1970s the Boston Joint Board merged with others to form the New England Regional Joint Board.

Records, including minutes, contracts, price lists, and scrapbooks, document the growth and maturity of the ACWA in Boston and the eventual decline of the industry in New England. Abundant contracts and price lists show the steady improvement of conditions for workers in the men’s clothing industry. Detailed minutes reflect the political and social influence of the ACWA; the Joint Board played an important role in local and state Democratic politics and it routinely contributed to a wide range of social causes including the Home for Italian Children and the United Negro College Fund. Minutes also document the post World War II development of industrial relations in the industry and include information relating to Joint Board decisions to strike. Minutes also contain information relating to shop grievances, arbitration, shop committees, and organizing. The records largely coincide with the years of leadership of Joseph Salerno, ACWA Vice President and New England Director from 1941 to 1972.

Gift of the New England Regional Joint Board, through Edward Clark, Nov. 1984

Subjects

Boston (Mass.)--Economic conditions--20th centuryClothing trade--Labor unions--MassachusettsLabor unions--Massachusetts--BostonTextile industry--MassachusettsTextile workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts--BostonTextile workers--Massachusetts--Economic conditions--20th century

Contributors

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Boston Joint BoardSalerno, Joseph, fl. 1907-1972

Types of material

ContractsFinancial recordsMinutes (Administrative records)Scrapbooks