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Yarn Finishers Union (Fall River, Mass.)

Yarn Finishers Union (Fall River, Mass.) Records

1919-1922
1 flat box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 006

The Yarn Finishers Union was one of several autonomous craft bodies affiliated with the Fall River-based American Federation of Textile Operatives (originally known as the National Amalgamation of Textile Workers). Active in several shops — including Durfee Mills, Tecumseh Mills, Union Belt Co., O.B. Wetherell and Son, and Troy Cotton and Woolen Manufactory — the Yarn Finishers included membership from different segments of the work force, including rollers, quillers, and harness markers.

This slender collection documents two years of labor activism by the Yarn Finishers Union in Fall River, Mass. The minutebook begins in May 1919 as the Yarn Finishers voted to strike over low and unequal wages, particularly those to “girls,” and includes references to elections, financial issues such as the proposition to institute a minimum wage scale, and to settling disputes. The minutes continue through the end of a much quieter year, 1922. The second volume consists of a record of union dues collected, arranged loosely by craft.

Subjects

Fall River (Mass.)--HistoryLabor unions--MassachusettsTextile workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

American Federation of Textile Operatives

Types of material

Minutebooks
Yeomans, Lawrence D.

Lawrence D. Yeomans Papers

1895-1946 Bulk: 1917-1919
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 873
Depiction of Lawrence D. Yeomans, nurse, and dog
Lawrence D. Yeomans, nurse, and dog

A native of Ontario, Lawrence D. Yeomans was working in New York when he volunteered for service in the U.S. Army Signal Corps during the First World War. For eighteen months, Yeomans served as a chauffeur with the Signal Corps in France, driving senior officers around Paris and to and from the front.

This small collection documents Lawrence Yeomans’ time as a chauffeur with the Signal Corps during the First World War. In addition to a handful of official documents relating to his service, Yeomans held onto a few pieces of ephemera as souvenirs, some postcards, and a set of photographs, including three depicting him in uniform and ten showing a display of German war material confiscated at war’s end.

Gift of Leslie Button, June 2015

Subjects

World War, 1914-1918

Types of material

EphemeraPhotographsPostcards
Yiamouyiannis, John

John Yiamouyannis Papers

1967-1999
22 boxes 33 linear feet
Call no.: MS 645

One of the most prominent and vocal scientific critics of fluoridation, the biochemist John Yiamouyiannis (1943-2000) spent over three decades fighting the professional and political establishment. A graduate of the University of Chicago with a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Rhode Island (1967), Yiamouyiannis became interested in the health effects of fluoride while employed as an editor with the Chemical Abstracts Service. His growing opposition to fluoridation, however, led to conflict with his employers and after being placed on probation in 1972, he resigned. Becoming a key organizer in the antifluoridation movement, he served at various times as the Executive Director of Health Action, the Science Director of the National Health Federation, founder and president of the Safe Water Foundation, and editor of the journal Fluoride. He also ran for the Senate from Ohio and twice for the U.S. Presidency on small party tickets, never garnering more than a handful of votes. Yiamouyiannis died of cancer at his home in Delaware, Ohio, on Oct. 8, 2000, at the age of 53.

Offering important insight into the antifluoridation movement in the 1970s through 1990s, the papers of John Yiamouyiannis offer a perspective on an unusually prolific and determined activist. The collection contains a large quantity of research material and correspondence relating to Yiamouyiannis’s antifluoridation work, and perhaps most importantly an extensive series of transcripts relating to civil cases in which he was involved.

Gift of Paul Connett, June 2012

Subjects

Antifluoridation movementDrinking water--Law and legislation--United StatesFluorides--Physiological effectFluorides--Toxicology

Contributors

Yiamouyannis, John
Young Women’s City Club (Northhampton, Mass.)

Young Women's City Club Records

1931-1981
2 boxes 0.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 045

Known as Girl’s City Club until 1954, the Young Women’s City Club was a non-sectarian, self-governing, and largely self-supporting club in Northampton, Massachusetts, that developed educational and recreational opportunities for young women through programs, social events, volunteer services, and fund-raising activities. The club met regularly under the auspices of the People’s Institute until November 1979 when their rooms at James House were taken over by the Highland Valley Elder Service and the club relocated to the People’s Institute.

The records of the Young Women’s City Club document the growth and activities of the club from 1939 to 1981, with the exception of the decade 1961 to 1971. Consisting of photocopies of originals still held by the People’s Institute, the collection includes minutes of council and business meetings and scrapbook pages.

Gift of Margaret Hutchins, People's Institute, 1985

Subjects

Women--Societies and clubs--Massachusetts

Contributors

Young Women's City Club (Northampton, Mass.)
Zickler Family

Zickler Family Scrapbook

1952
1 vol. 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 446
Depiction of Zicklers on a picnic
Zicklers on a picnic

Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Zickler of Leominster, Massachusetts began a 3 month cross-country road trip on March 27, 1952. Mrs. Zickler created a scrapbook to document the trip. The scrapbook includes souvenir and original photographs, postcards, maps, and other miscellaneous memorabilia from the journey. Their stops include various tourist attractions as well as scenic areas throughout the Midwest and Southwest of the United States. Most of their time was spent in Oraibi, the oldest continuously inhabited community in North America, on the Navajo Gospel Mission. The Zicklers returned to Leominster in July 1952, having traveled a total of 10,404 miles.

The scrapbook spans the entirety of the Zickler’s trip. It includes postcards, souvenir photographs from tourist locations such as the Grand Canyon, Yellowstone National Park, the Big Rock Candy Mountain, Hoover Dam, the Petrified Forest (as well as a piece of wood from the Forest), placemats and matchboxes from Las Vegas, and numerous souvenir photographs of the Navajo Gospel Mission.

Acquired from Peter Masi, Apr. 2005

Subjects

Arizona--Description and travelAutomobile travelCalifornia--Description and travelGrand Canyon (Ariz.)Navajo Gospel MissionNevada--Description and travelOraibi (Ariz.)United States--Description and travelYellowstone National ParkZickler family

Contributors

Zickler, Ernest

Types of material

PhotographsScrapbooks
Zusman, Susan

Susan Zusman Papers

1981-2000
4 boxes 6 linear feet
Call no.: MS 966

After undergraduate work at Brandeis, the geneticist Susan Zusman became the first graduate student in the Princeton lab of Eric Wieschaus, the future Nobel laureate. Beginning in 1981, Zusman studied the early development in Drosophila by inducing mutations in genes used in gastrulation, using genetic mosaics and gynandromorphs. After completing her degree in 1987, she went on to a post-doctoral project in Paul Schedl’s lab, also at Princeton, using antibodies to determine the location of the dorsal protein in Drosophila embryos, and then moved to a three-year Howard Hughes Postdoctoral Associate at the Cancer Institute at MIT (1988-1991), working with Richard Hynes to explore the function of extracellular matrix molecules and integrins in Drosophila. She subsequently joined the faculty at the University of Rochester before leaving for positions in industry. After leaving Rochester in 1998, she served as Executive Director of Functional Genomics for Novartis then, in 2002, became a founder and CEO of Genetic Services, Inc.

The Zusman collection documents one woman’s successful career in Drosohpila studies. Beginning with some materials from her undergraduate program, the collection includes notes, drafts, photographs (both technical and personal), and data generated in her studies, reflecting much of the modern development of embryological and genetic techniques prior to the impact of gene sequencing. There is relatively little content from her time in industry.

Gift of Susan Zusman, March 2017

Subjects

Developmental biologyDrosophila--DevelopmentDrosophila--GeneticsGeneticsWieschaus, Eric F.Women in science