Collections: C

Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-

Alexander E. Cance Papers

1911-1951
6 boxes 2.75 linear feet
Call no.: FS 045
Depiction of Alexander E. Cance
Alexander E. Cance

Professor and Head of the Agricultural Economics Department at the Massachusetts Agricultural College who also worked briefly for Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Herbert Hoover, as well as the United States Department of Agriculture.

Includes biographical materials, correspondence concerning Cance’s role in the agricultural cooperative movement, addresses, articles (both in typescript and published), lectures, book reviews, typescript of a Carnegie study of factors in agricultural economics, a summary of a U.S. Senate report of which he was co-author, “Agricultural Cooperation and Rural Credit in Europe,” and research material. No documentation of his role as a delegate to the Hoover Conference on Economic Crisis, 1920, or his position as Supervisor of Market Research with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1922.

Subjects

Massachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMassachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural EconomicsMassachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural EconomicsMassachusetts State College--Faculty

Contributors

Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-
Cannabis Reform Coalition

Cannabis Reform Coalition Records

1993-2013
2 boxes 2 linear feet
Call no.: RG 045/80 C3
Depiction of Extravaganja poster
Extravaganja poster

The Cannabis Reform Coalition at UMass Amherst was founded in 1991 and is considered the oldest student-run organization devoted to ending the prohibition on marijuana both locally and nationally and advocating for its industrial, medicinal, and recreational use for moral, environmental, and economic reasons. The CRC is one of the more active student organizations on campus and among other events, it sponsors the annual Extravaganja in April, which has attracted as many as 10,000 participants.

The CRC collection contains an assortment of fliers, posters, ephemera, and photographs, documenting the organization’s activities and activism, along with a small number of published and unpublished essays on the utility of hemp and cannbis products.

Subjects

Marijuana--Law and legislationMarijuana--Therapeutic use--Social aspectsUniversity of Massachusetts Amherst--Students

Types of material

Fliers (Printed matter)Photographs
Canning, Josiah D. (Josiah Dean), 1816-1892

Josiah D. Canning, The Shad-Fishers Manuscript

1854
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1009 bd

The “Peasant Bard” of Gill, Mass., Josiah D. Canning, published five books of poetry between 1838 and 1892 extolling the spiritual virtues of nature and the agrarian life. The son of a minister, Canning worked as a printer for several years before settling down to farming life, churning out poetry that reflected his reverence for the land.

This small collection consists of a printed copy of Josiah Canning’s fourth book, The Shad-Fishers, published by R.C. Graves in Greenfield, Mass., in 1854, along with a manuscript copy of the same work bound in workmanlike leather over boards. Although it is not possible to determine with certainty, the manuscript may be Canning’s own.

Acquired from Eugene Povirk, Jan. 2018

Subjects

Poetry--Massachusetts--Gill

Types of material

Manuscripts (Documents)
Carpino, Louis A.

Louis A. Carpino Papers

1943-2019
20 boxes 21 linear feet
Call no.: FS 199

A distinguished, productive, and beloved professor of chemistry, Louis A. Carpino, born in 1927, was the son of Italian immigrants who settled in Des Moines, Iowa, where he grew up and went to high school and college. He earned his doctorate in organic chemistry from University of Illinois in 1953 and in the fall of 1954 arrived at UMass Amherst, where he would spend his career. A pioneer in the development of amino‐protecting groups and coupling reagents for use in the synthesis of biologically active materials such as pharmaceuticals, polynucleotides, PNAs, peptides, and small proteins, Carpino had some 30 patents to his name. He was honored both on campus (with, for example, a University Samuel Conti Faculty Fellowship Award and a College Outstanding Researcher Award), nationally (Hirschman Award from the American Chemical Society), and internationally (Humboldt Award and Max Bergmann Medal, both from Germany). In 1958, Carpino married one of his former chemistry students; Barbara Carpino finished her degree with the class of 1962. They had six children; the family joined Carpino on his sabbaticals in Italy and other overseas locations. Louis Carpino retired in 2004 with emeritus status and continued to be active in his lab. He passed away in January 2019.

The Carpino Papers consist of notebooks, research notes and files, correspondence, files relating to patents, and reprints of Carpino’s publications, along with personal papers and memorabilia, letters and notes (many written on the 3×5 index cards Carpino habitually carried in his shirt pocket), photographs, several passports, and honors and awards given to Carpino, including the 1998 Max Bergmann Gold Medal. Notable is an illustrated comical family story created by Carpino as a teenager in Iowa, done in pen on loose paper.

Gift of Barbara A. Carpino, Nov.-Dec. 2019

Subjects

Chemistry, OrganicMassachusetts Agricultural College--FacultyMassachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Chemistry
Carroll, Lucius W.

Lucius W. Carroll Ledger

1841-1862
1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 245 bd

Businessman in several partnerships in south-central Worcestor county who owned a general store in Webster, Massachusetts. Includes lists of partners (such as John P. Stockwell of Stockwell and Carroll), yearly salaries and profits, accounts of what he sold and how he was paid, lists of individual customers and manufacturing companies, and labor accounts of workers. Also contains an alphabetical index to the ledger and several pages of notes receivable and notes payable.

Subjects

Barter--Massachusetts--History--19th centuryDudley (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th centuryDudley Woolen Manufacturing Company (Dudley, Mass.)General stores--MassachusettsMerchants--Massachusetts--Economic conditions--19th centuryShopping--Massachusetts--History--19th centurySlater, GeorgeStockwell & CarrollUnion Mills (Webster, Mass.)Uxbridge (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th centuryWebster (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th centuryWebster Woolen Mills (Webster, Mass.)

Contributors

Carroll & CrosbyCarroll, Lucius W

Types of material

Account books
Carton, Robert J.

Robert J. Carton Papers

1935-2002 Bulk: 1983-2002
3 boxes linear feet
Call no.: MS 643

The environmental scientist Robert J. Carton emerged in the mid-1980s as one of the leading scientific critics of fluoridation of the water supply. After receiving his doctorate in Environmental Science from Rutgers University, Carton accepted a position in 1972 with the Office of Toxic Substances in the Environmental Protection Agency, assessing the risks associated with a range of toxic substances from asbestos to arsenic and hexachlorobenzene. By 1985, Carton became concerned about EPA standards for fluoride in drinking water, taking a public stance against undue political influence in framing those standards and insisting that there was no scientific evidence that fluorides prevented tooth decay and that any level of fluoride exposure presented a significant health hazard. In 1992, Carton left the EPA to work for as Chief of Environmental Compliance for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command in Fort Detrick, Maryland.

Consisting primarily of research, notes, and some correspondence relating to the health effects of fluoridation of drinking water, the collection documents Robert Carton’s nearly two decade long struggle against the EPA and federal government. Also included are transcripts of filings relating to various legal challenges against fluoridation during the mid-1980s.

Subjects

Drinking water--Law and legislation--United StatesFluorides--Physiological effectUnited States. Environmental Protection Agency

Contributors

Carton, Robert J
Catholic Church

Ordo ad consecrandum virginum [Order for the consecration of nuns]

ca.1360
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1060
Depiction of Ordo ad consecrandum virginum
Ordo ad consecrandum virginum

Founded in 1067, the Benedictine convent of San Pier Maggiore was an ecclesiastical center of medieval Florence, and socially one the city’s most prestigious religious houses for women. A Gothic church was completed at the convent in 1352, featuring an elaborate multi-paneled altarpiece by Jacopo di Cione. The convent remained active until its razing in 1784.

A utilitarian, but ritually significant work, this manuscript contains the text and music used in celebrating the consecration of nuns at the Benedictine convent of San Pier Maggiore. The acanthus border on the first folio suggests a mid-fourteenth century date of origin, though likely prior to the commissioning of Cione’s Coronation of the Virgin altarpiece.

Acquired from Les Enluminures, Dec. 2018
Language(s): Latin

Subjects

Benedictine nuns--Italy--FlorenceCatholic Church--Liturgy--Texts--Early works to 1800Consecration of nuns--Italy--FlorenceFlorence (Italy)--Religious life and customsSan Pier Maggiore (Florence, Italy)

Types of material

Illuminated manuscriptsRituals (liturgical books)
Catholic Church

Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Gertrud (Cologne, Germany) Book of Hours

ca.1481-1488
1 vol. 0.2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1057
Depiction of Close-up of King David
Close-up of King David

The Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Gertud (Dominican Convent of Saint Gertrude) operated in Cologne, Germany, for nearly five and half centuries. An important center in connection with German mysticism in the 13th and 14th centuries, the Kloster survived the Reformation, however persistently poor finances led to its decline in the 18th century. After it was abolished during a wave of secularization on October 14, 1802.

This diminutive book of hours was prepared by Dominican nuns at the Kloster St. Gertrud during the 1480s. Like some other German books of hours it lacks the calendar, Gospel lessons, and the two prayers to the Virgin, Obsecro te and O intemerata, however it includes additional liturgical texts, such as Offices for major feasts, as well as music for the funeral service. This copy may have been made for or by the prioress Magdalena Frankengruenerin (1481-1488), and remained in the convent until the eighteenth century.

Acquired from Les Enluminures, Nov. 2018
Language(s): Latin

Subjects

Books of hours--Germany--Early works to 1800Catholic Church--Liturgy--Texts--Early works to 1800Catholic Church--Prayers and devotions--Latin--Early works to 1800Dominikanerinnenkloster St. Gertrud (Cologne, Germany)

Contributors

Drieschen, Maria CatharinaFrankengruenerin, Magdalena

Types of material

Books of hoursIlluminated manuscripts
Catholic Church

Book of Hours (Use of Rome)

ca.1465
1 vol. 144 fol. linear feet
Call no.: MS 963
Depiction of Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary
Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary

Books of hours are the most common surviving form of the medieval book and are as diverse as the patrons who commissioned them. Beginning in the mid-thirteenth century, they flourished as part of a rich array of devotional works used to frame the temporal structure of a community’s spiritual lives. In keeping with individual spiritual and aesthetic preferences, books of hours were often customized to appeal to the particular purchaser, and they vary greatly through time and from region to region.

This diminutive and comparatively austere book of hours (Use of Rome) appears to have been produced near Bruges between about 1460 and 1470, possibly influenced by the prolific illuminator Willem Vrelant. Written in Latin in a skilled Gothic Italic Rotunda hand, the book lacks a calendar and miniatures of any kind, nor is there any evidence that any were ever present.

Acquired from Scott Gwara, Feb. 2017
Language(s): Latin

Subjects

Books of hours--Belgium--Early works to 1800

Contributors

Catholic Church--Liturgy--Texts--Early works to 1800Catholic Church--Prayers and devotions--Latin--Early works to 1800Hammer, Christian, 1818-1905Virgin, Thore, 1886-1957

Types of material

Books of hoursIlluminated manuscripts
Catholic Church

Book of Hours (Use of Bourges)

ca.1460
1 vol. 0.2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 1077
Depiction of

Guillaume Claude Robinet, an avocat du roi from Issoudun (Indre), France, married Catherine Tabouet on Jan. 15, 1591.

A medieval book of hours of the use of Bourges, this manuscript is illuminated with six miniature paintings, each above a four-line initial and accompanied by an originally four-sided floral border (now trimmed at the top). The association of the manuscript with Robinet and Tabouet is based on the use of their names on the front and rear boards of the binding, which may have been commissioned at around the time of their wedding in 1591.

Acquired from Maggs Brothers, Apr. 2019
Language(s): Latin

Subjects

Books of hours--France--Early works to 1800Catholic Church--Prayers and devotions--Latin--Early works to 1800Catholic church--Liturgy--Tests--Early works to 1800

Types of material

Books of hoursIlluminated manuscripts