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Results for: “University of Massachusetts Amherst. Program in Comparative Literature” (1091 collections)SCUA

Lynton, E. A. (Ernest Albert)

E. A. Lynton Papers, 1951-1975.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 132

An authority in the field of low-temperature physics and superconductivity, Ernest A. Lynton was brought to UMass Amherst in 1973 to serve as the first Vice President for Academic Affairs and Commonwealth Professor of Physics. Lynton was charged with diversifying the student body and broadening the curriculum to emphasize social issues. Born in Berlin Germany in 1926, Lynton received a doctorate in physics from Yale in 1951. He served in his administrative post until 1980, when he took a position as Commonwealth Professor at UMass Boston.

Centered largely on Ernest Lynton’s teaching, the collection contains lecture notes and handouts for Physics courses (Physics 107, 171, Concepts in Physics, Thermodynamics, Statistical Physics), a copy of his dissertation Second Sound in He3-He 4 mixtures, and copies of his book on superconductivity in English, German, and French editions.

Subjects

  • Physics--Study and teaching
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics

Contributors

  • Lynton, E. A. (Ernest Albert)

Mange, Arthur P.

Arthur P. Mange Papers, 1955-1986.

8 boxes (4 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 080
Tent caterpillar
Tent caterpillar

A specialist in human genetics, Arthur P. Mange studied the population genetics of small villages, the genetics of fruit flies (Drosophila), worked on early computer applications of genetic models and statistics, wrote textbooks on genetics, taught in the Biology and Zoology departments at the University, and is a published photographer of gravestones and whimsical signs. Mange was born in St. Louis, Missouri in 1931 and earned a B.A. in physics from Cornell, and an M.S. and Ph.D. from the University of Wisconsin. Mange joined the University faculty in 1964, teaching genetics until his retirement in 1995.

The Arthur Mange Papers are comprised of his extensive documentation of the inhabitants of villages in the northern United States and southern Canada, including information about certain genetic factors and their result on the population. His records cover the 1960s and in some cases the early 1970s. Mange was also a talented photographer, and his collection includes approximately 200 of his photographs, including abstract and nature photos and images of New England scenery and the UMass campus.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Biology Department

Contributors

  • Mange, Arthur P

Types of material

  • Photographs

Mann, Eric

Eric Mann and Lian Hurst Mann Papers, 1967-2007.

22 boxes (11 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 657
Eric Mann, Dec. 1969<br />Photo by Jeff Albertson
Eric Mann, Dec. 1969
Photo by Jeff Albertson

Revolutionary organizers, writers, and theorists, Eric Mann and Lian Hurst Mann have been active in the struggle for civil rights for decades. The son of Jewish Socialist and labor organizer from New York, Mann came of age during the early phases of the Civil Rights movement and after graduating from Cornell (1964), he became field secretary for the Congress of Racial Equality. Increasingly radicalized through exposure to Black revolutionary nationalists, Mann took part in the Newark Community Union Project and became a leader in anti-imperialist opposition to the war in Vietnam as a New England regional coordinator for the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS) and later with the Revolutionary Youth Movement I — the Weatherman above-ground tendency of SDS. Following a militant demonstration at the Harvard Center for International Affairs late in 1969, Mann was convicted of assault on the basis of perjured testimony and sentenced to two years in prison. An organizer of his fellow prisoners even behind bars, he was “shipped out” often in the middle of the night, from prison to prison, spending the last year at Concord State Prison. After being released early in July 1971, he continued his prison activism through the Red Prison Movement. At the same time, as a writer, he earned a national audience for his book Comrade George: an account of the life, politics, and assassination of Soledad Brother George Jackson. Feeling himself at a low point in his radical career, Mann met Lian Hurst while vacationing in Mexico during the summer 1974. Hurst, a leader in the Berkeley Oakland Women’s Union, architect, and a strong Socialist Feminist, soon became his partner in life and politics, and Mann left Massachusetts to join with her in Berkeley. Hurst lead a group of women from BOWU who formed a “Thursday night group” and left the organization with the polemic, “socialist feminism is bourgeois feminism” all of whom moved towards integrating women’s liberation and Marxism-Leninism. At her urging, the two took part in Marxist Leninist party building, becoming union organizers with the United Auto Workers, and eventually moving to Los Angeles. Hurst was elected shop steward by her fellow workers as a known revolutionary. There, Mann led a campaign to keep the Van Nuys assembly plant open (1982-1992) — captured in his book, Taking on General Motors. They joined the August 29th Movement and its successor, the League of Revolutionary Struggle. They left LRS in 1984. In 1989, Mann and veterans of the GM Van Nuys Campaign formed the Labor/Community Strategy Center, which has been a primary focal points for their work ever since, helping to build consciousness, leadership, and organization within communities of color. Hurst became editor of AhoraNow, an innovative bilingual left publication that featured articles by Black and Latino working class leaders and helped initiate the center’s National School for Strategic Organizing. In 2003 Hurst wrote, “Socialist Feminism: Thoughts After 30 Years” for AhoraNow, a critical re-engagement of those important debates from an historical perspective after a 30 year reunion of BOWU’s key leaders. Mann’s latest book is Playbook For Progressives: 16 Qualities of the Successful Organizer. Hurst and Mann continue to write and agitate in the cause of revolutionary change, particularly for oppressed communities of color.

The Mann-Hurst collection contains the records of two lives intertwined with one another with the cause of liberation of Black and Latino communities, women, and an internationalist pro-socialist anti-imperialism. Containing a nearly complete set of publications, the collection also contains early materials on Lian Hurst’s work with BOWU and the both Eric and Lian’s time as organizers for the UAW and their participation in the August 29th Movement and League of Revolutionary Struggle. Of particular interest are a series of letters home written by Eric during his imprisonment. The collection contains comparatively little on Hurst and Manns’ more recent work with the Labor/Strategy Strategy Center or Bus Riders Union

Subjects

  • August 29th Movement
  • Berkeley Oakland Women's Union
  • Communists--California
  • Feminism
  • International Union, United Automobile, Aerospace, and Agricultural Implement Workers of America
  • Labor unions--California
  • League of Revolutionary Struggle (M-L)
  • Prisoners--Massachusetts
  • Red Prison Movements
  • Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)

Contributors

  • Mann, Lian Hurst

Marier, John R.

John R. Marier Papers, ca.1960-2010.

20 boxes (30 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 908
John Marier, ca.1952
John Marier, ca.1952

The environmental chemist John R. Marier (1925-1992) joined the staff of the Applied Biology Division of the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC) as a “laboratory helper” in Aug. 1943 and though entirely without university training, worked his way up to laboratory technician and, by 1967, into the ranks of professional staff. His early work on food and dairy chemistry grew into sustained research into the quantitative chemical analysis of biological tissues. Beginning in the mid-1960s, he wrote frequently on the environmental and physiological impact of fluoride, culminating in his 1971 report, Environmental Fluoride, and is noted as an important figure in raising concern over its role as “a persistent bioaccumulator.” Marier retired from the NRCC in 1985, but remained active in the field for several years, expanding into research on magnesium and its function in muscle contraction. Marier died of a massive cardiac and pulmonary failure on Mar. 4, 1992.

The Marier Papers are a particularly rich record of correspondence and notes on the impact of fluoridation from a Canadian specialist in environmental chemistry.

Subjects

  • Environmental chemistry--Canada
  • Fluorides--Physiological effect

Marino, Michella M.

Digital

Michella Marino Oral History Collection, 2011-2012.

23 items
Call no.: MS 812

Michella Marino received her doctorate from the Department History of at UMass Amherst in May 2013. Her dissertation, Sweating femininity: women athletes, masculine culture, and American inequality from 1930 to the present, drew on extensive oral historical and archival research to examine how feminist women negotiated the cultural boundaries surrounding gender to carve out identities as women, athletes, and mothers. Focusing on women’s participation in two sports, basketball and roller derby, Marino wrote that her goal was to “explain the tension between women’s representation and agency, between cultural constructs and women’s lives, between images of women and their individual identities.”

The Marino Collection consists of 23 oral historical interviews with female and male participants in roller derby and basketball.

Subjects

  • Roller derby
  • Sex discrimination in sports--History
  • Sports for women
  • Women athletes
  • Women's basketball

Types of material

  • Oral histories

McIntosh, Beatrice A.

Beatrice A. McIntosh Cookery Collection, ca.1880-2005.

ca.8,000 items (200 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 395

The McIntosh Cookery Collection includes books, pamphlets, and ephemera relating to the history of cookery in New England. Of particular note are nearly 7,500 cookbooks prepared by community organizations from the 1880s to the present, usually for fund-raising or charitable purposes. These cookbooks were produced by a variety of organizations, including parent-teacher groups, churches and synagogues, social service agencies, private clubs, and historical societies as fund-raising projects.

These cookbooks document important aspects of the lives of families and women in the region, as well as ethnic groups and their adaptation of traditional foods to New England. The collection is focused primarily on New England, but includes cookbooks from other states for comparative purposes.

Subjects

  • Community cookbooks
  • Cookbooks
  • Cookery--New England

Memory Corps

Too often recorded history is made up only of dates and facts, famous people and famous places. The memories that mean the most to most of us — the individuals who truly make a community what it is — can be overlooked or forgotten. The University Archives has sought to capture the memories of alumni, hoping to create a richer picture of our shared past. Through brief interviews with interested alumni, the Memory Corps project hopes to gather the stories of life at UMass and lives before and since.

Class of 1961
Gail CroteauGail Croteau
Class of 1961

“The interesting thing was at that time the women on campus were used I think to a certain extent to control the young men who had come because we had to be in at 7:00 at night for the first eight weeks, and I think the thinking was that if we were in then the boys wouldn’t get into as much trouble. But I’m sure if that worked or not.”

Chester Gallup

Chester Gallup
Class of 1961

“It didn’t seem crowded; it seemed kind of rural really and I like that part about it.”

Ronald Trudeau

Ronald Trudeau
Class of 1961

“I was scared to death. There were beanies back in those days and so you sure got identified, and I got hazed a little bit by the upperclassmen, but all good naturedly and friendly too… if it wasn’t for the friends on the floor…those kids all were scared, too, and it was great support.”

James Lavin

James Lavin
Class of 1961

“It was interesting, because when we came here they gave us little beanies we had to wear and cardboard placards and we felt kind of funny, embarrassed at times, however, everyone on campus was so friendly as if they’d been doing this for years…so it was a welcoming campus.”

Miles, Manly, 1826-1898

Manly Miles Papers, ca.1882-1886.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 134
Manly Miles
Manly Miles

A pioneer in scientific agriculture, Manly Miles was born in Homer, N.Y., in 1826. A naturalist by inclination with a strong practical streak, Miles took a degree in medicine at Rush Medical College (1850) and practiced as a physician for eight years. His interests in the natural sciences, however, soon left him to abandon medicine, and after accepting a position with the State Geological Survey in Michigan from 1858-1861, he turned to academia. An early member of the faculty at Michigan State College, and later Illinois State College, he was recruited to the agricultural faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College by President Paul Chadbourne in 1882. Four years later, however, following Chadbourne’s untimely death, Miles returned to Lansing, Mich., where he remained until his death in 1898. During his career, he was noted for his interests in organic evolution and plant and animal breeding.

The Miles collection contains 8 notebooks containing notes on reading. In addition to a general notebook on scientific matters, the remaining seven are organized by subject: Breeds of animals, Farm buildings, Farm economy, Feeding and animals, Implements, Manures, and Stock breeding.

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Study and teaching
  • Animal breeding
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts State College. Department of Agricultural Economics

Contributors

  • Miles, Manly, 1826-1898

Types of material

  • Notebooks

Nash, Herman B., Jr.

Herman B. Nash Papers, ca.1935-2010.

7 boxes (10.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 895
Civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., March 1965
Civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery, Ala., March 1965

In 1944, eighteen-year old Herman B. “Keek” Nash enlisted in the Army, and after intensive Japanese language training, was assigned for duty as an intelligence officer in American-occupied Osaka, Japan. Settling in northern New Jersey after his discharge from the service in 1947, Nash held a succession of jobs, including brakeman on the Pennsylvania Railroad, before deciding to try his hand at teaching, earning a master’s degree in education at Columbia Teachers College. A solid leftist politically and a strong supporter of social justice causes and civil rights, he marched with Martin Luther King at Selma and Washington, though his ardor and political convictions came at a cost. Investigated by the FBI for alleged Communist sympathies in the late 1950s, Nash was fired from his position teaching high school science in Teaneck, N.J., in 1969, after leading a sit-in protest against school tracking. He subsequently returned to work on the railroad, where he was active with the union and took part in efforts to increase participation by African Americans and women. Yoneko Nash, Nash’s wife of 43 years, died in 2004, with Keek following in 2010.

A rich assemblage, the papers of Herman Nash offer a glimpse into the life experiences of a socially conscious veteran of the Second World War. Nearly a quarter of the collection stems from Nash’s time in the military service, including while he was learning Japanese at the University of Chicago (1944-1945) and while he was stationed in occupied Japan from spring 1946 through the following winter. Among other noteworthy items are a thick series of intelligence reports on the reaction of the local population to the occupation, noting episodes of civil unrest, crime, and other forms of social instability. The collection also contains a significant body of correspondence with family and friends, including serval whom he met in Japan. The balance of the collection relates to Nash’s interests in social justice causes, highlighted by a significant series of photographs taken during a massive civil rights demonstration in Montgomery, Ala.

Subjects

  • Civil rights movements
  • Japan--History--Allied occupation, 1945-1952

Types of material

  • Photographs

National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (U.S.). Maryland Chapter

National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (U.S.). Maryland Chapter, 1976-1977.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 899

The Maryland Chapter of the National Organization for the Reform of Marijuana Laws (NORML) was formed at the University of Maryland in Dec. 1976.

This small collection contains an assortment of NORML-related ephemera, including bumper stickers, pins, fliers, and brochures, along with some organizational notes, memberships rosters, and a copy of their newsletter.

Subjects

  • Marijuana--Law and legislation
  • Marijuana--Therapeutic use--Social aspects

Types of material

  • Bumper stickers