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Greenfield (Mass.) Peace Center

Greenfield Peace Center Records

1962-1978
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 121

Formed in 1963, the Greenfield Peace Center viewed itself as an educational organization teaching about and advocating for world peace. Their activities included organizing peace marches, warning against the dangers of nuclear war, conducting teach-ins, campaigning against war toys, and counseling on the alternatives to the draft.

Correspondence, administrative documents, and news clippings relating to peace activism centered in Greenfield, Massachusetts and in the upper Pioneer Valley, especially by the Greenfield Community Peace Center, William Hefner, and Turn Toward Peace.

Subjects

  • Peace movements--Massachusetts
  • Turn Toward Peace
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Hefner, William K
Greenough, James C.

James C. Greenough Papers

1854-1887
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: RG 003/1 G74
Image of James C. Greenough
James C. Greenough

James C. Greenough was born in 1829 in Wendell, Massachusetts. After working as a schoolteacher in Heath, Massachusetts, from 1854 to 1856, Flint returned to the State Normal School at Westfield to become assistant principal, leaving there in 1871 to become principal of the Rhode Island Normal School. In 1883, Greenough came to the Massachusetts Agricultural College to become president, serving for three years. During his tenure, he was noted for raising academic standards, extending the course of study, and guiding a transition from a small vocational college to a more comprehensive institution supporting agriculture and extension services. Greenough saw the construction of the college chapel and the establishment of the Experiment Station before finishing his term in 1886.

The Greenough collection includes 3 letters (1885-1921); biographical materials; a published letter to alumni (1884); photocopy, and an Annual Report (1883).

Subjects

  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Contributors

  • Greenough, James C
Greenwich (Mass.)

Greenwich Town Records

1782-1916
2 reels 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 337 mf

Microfilm town records of Greenwich, Massachusetts consisting primarily of warrants for and minutes of town meetings as well as transcripts of meetings for state and national elections, militia lists, voter lists, and pew lists.

Subjects

  • Greenwich (Mass.)--History
Halpern, Joel Martin

Joel Martin Halpern Atlas of Massachusetts Collection

1985-1989
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 263

As a contributor to the Atlas of Massachusetts, Professor Joel Halpern collected data and articles in support of his essay published in the “Ethnic Groups” section. The collection consists primarily of drafts of his essay and research notes.

Subjects

  • Atlas of Massachusetts
  • Ethnic groups--Massachusetts
  • Immigrants--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Halpern, Joel Martin
Hapgood, Charles H.

Charles H. Hapgood Papers

1955-1996
6 boxes 2.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 445

Charles Hutchins Hapgood (1904-1982) was working toward a doctorate in French history at Harvard when the Great Depression derailed his plans. After a succession of jobs and wartime service, however, Hapgood returned to the academy, teaching history at Springfield College and Keene State for over three decades. He is best remembered as an advocate of several scientifically heterodox ideas, arguing that the earth’s outer crust shifts on geological time scales, displacing continents, and that the earth’s rotational axis has shifted numerous times in geological history. A long time friend and supporter of the medium Elwood Babbitt, he was author of several books, including The Earth’s Shifting Crust (1958), Maps of the Ancient Sea Kings (1966), The Path of the Pole (1970), and Voices of Spirit : Through the Psychic Experience of Elwood Babbitt (1975). Hapgood died in Fitchburg, Mass., on Dec. 21, 1982, after being struck by an automobile.

The Hapgood Papers contain a small grouping of correspondence and writings that offer a glimpse into some of Charles Hapgood’s late-career interests. Although the correspondence is relatively slight, relating primarily to publications in the last two or three years of his life, the collection is a rich resource for the lectures and writings of Elwood Babbitt.

Subjects

  • Channeling (Spiritualism)
  • Mediums--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Babbitt, Elwood, 1922-
  • Hapgood, Charles H
Hawks, Alice Totman

Alice Totman Hawks Collection

1934-1978
4 boxes 5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 731
Image of

Born on January 29, 1908 in Conway, Massachusetts, Alice Totman spent her early years on her father’s family farm, Page Place, before he was forced to sell it due to a labor scarcity in 1916 and moved the family to Greenfield. She graduated from Greenfield High School in 1927 and enrolled at Massachusetts School of Art in Boston. She studied there for a year and a half before marrying Hart Mowry Hawks on June 16, 1929. The couple settled in Bellows Fall, Vermont where Mowry was recently assigned a permanent post with the Boston and Maine Railroad. Tragically, over the next fifteen years, Alice experienced seven pregnancies, only one of which resulted in a healthy child, Gertrude Ann, born in 1932. Alice’s interest in her family can be traced back to the earliest days of her marriage, during which time she worked on genealogies for both the Totman and Hawks families. Eager to share the knowledge she acquired and assembled, she often found ways to update her relatives, most notably in a family newsletter called Tot-Kin that she edited and published between the years 1935-1945.

Alice Totman Hawks’s collection consists of her extensive genealogical notes and writings, including a run of Tot-Kin, correspondence and some of Alice’s sketches.

Subjects

  • Hawks family
  • Massachusetts--Genealogy
  • Totman family

Contributors

  • Hawks, Alice Totman

Types of material

  • Genealogies
  • Letters (Correspondence)
Heiligmann, Carlos

Carlos Heiligmann Collection

2002-2017
246 images digital linear feet
Call no.: PH 076
Image of William Turnbull Library, Ashfield, Mass.
William Turnbull Library, Ashfield, Mass.

Since his youth in Mexico City, Carlos Heiligmann has traveled with a camera in hand. An industrial engineer by training and documentary photographer by nature, he has captured images throughout his world travels, and recently has concentrated on recording libraries in the small towns of western Massachusetts.

The digital photographs that comprise this collection document nearly four dozen public libraries in Berkshire, Franklin, and Hampshire counties in western Massachusetts.

Gift of Carlos Heiligmann, June 2017

Subjects

  • Public libraries--Massachusetts
Henderson, Elizabeth, 1943-

Elizabeth Henderson Papers

1966-2011
10 boxes 15 linear feet
Call no.: MS 746
Image of

A farmer, activist, and writer, Elizabeth Henderson has exerted an enormous influence on the movement for organic and sustainable agriculture since the 1970s. Although Henderson embarked on an academic career after completing a doctorate at Yale on the Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky in 1974, by 1980, she abandoned academia for Unadilla Farm in Gill, Mass., where she learned organic techniques for raising vegetables. Relocating to Rose Valley Farm in Wayne County, NY, in 1989, she helped establish Genesee Valley Organic CSA (GVOCSA), one of the first in the country, and she continued the relationship with the CSA after founding Peacework Organic Farm in Newark, NY, in 1998. Deeply involved in the organic movement at all levels, Henderson was a founding member of the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) in Massachusetts, has served on the Board of Directors for NOFA NY, the NOFA Interstate Council, SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) Northeast, and many other farming organizations at the state, regional, and national level, and she has been an important voice in national discussions on organic standards, fair trade, and agricultural justice. Among other publications, Henderson contributed to and edited The Real Dirt: Farmers Tell about Organic and Low-Input Practices in the Northeast and co-wrote Sharing the Harvest: A Citizen’s Guide to Community Supported Agriculture (1999, with Robyn Van En) and A Manual of Whole Farm Planning (2003, with Karl North).

Offering insight into the growth of the organic agriculture movement and the organizations that have sustained it, the Henderson Papers document Henderson’s involvement with NOFA, SARE, and the GVOCSA, along with her work to establish organic standards and promote organic practices. Henderson’s broad social and political commitments are represented by a rich set of letters from her work educating prisoners in the late 1970s, including correspondence with Tiyo Attallah Salah-El and John Clinkscales, and with the American Independent Movement in New Haven during the early 1970s, including a nearly complete run of the AIM Bulletin and its successor Modern Times.

Subjects

  • American Independent Movement (Conn.)
  • Community Supported Agriculture
  • Genesee Valley Organic
  • Northeast Organic Farming Association
  • Organic farming
  • Peacework Organic Farm (Newark, N.Y.)
  • Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program

Contributors

  • Clinkscale, John
  • Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah

Types of material

  • Newspapers
Holt, Margaret

Margaret Holt Collection

1983-1991
10 boxes 15 linear feet
Call no.: MS 450

A peace activist since the 1960s, Margaret Goddard Holt not only demonstrated against war, she led efforts to educate others about the effects of war. A member of the Gray Panthers of the Pioneer Valley and a co-founder along with her husband, Lee Holt, of the Amherst Vigil for a Nuclear Free World, she was sent as a delegate to Rome, Italy to visit Pope John XXIII advocating for a world without war. In addition to her dedication to peace and nuclear disarmament, Holt’s concern for prisoners developed into an involvement in prison-related issues.

The Holt collection of publications, brochures, news clippings, and correspondence reveals her interests and documents her role as a community activist during the 1980s.

Subjects

  • Activists--Massachusetts
  • Pacifists--Massachusetts
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Holt, Margaret
Independent Condenser Workers Union. Local 200

Independent Condenser Workers Union Local 2 Records

1946-1973
4 boxes 2 linear feet
Call no.: MS 315

Local 2 of the Independent Condenser Workers Union represented employees of the Sprague Electric Company in North Adams, Massachusetts. Beginning in the 1930s, Sprague was one of the largest employers in the Berkshires. Employing 4,000 workers, Sprague provided one-third of the area’s jobs, many of them held by women. By the 1960s, however, Sprague began increasing layoffs, and in 1985 the company moved its world headquarters out of North Adams, closing all but two small facilities.

Records of Local 2 include by-laws, constitutions, correspondence, company publications, and minutes of meetings between management and union representatives.

Subjects

  • Electricians--Labor unions
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Sprague Electric Company