Results for: “Social change--Political activity--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History” (973 collections)SCUA

New Salem Academy

New Salem Academy Collection, 1874-1945.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 037

The New Salem Academy was founded February 25, 1795, “for the purposes of promoting piety, religion, and morality, and for instruction of youth in such languages and in such of the liberal arts and sciences as the trustees shall direct.”

The collection consists of the student exercise book of Ernest Howe Vaughan, later a teacher in Greenwich and an attorney in Worcester, along with an issue of the alumni magazine, The Reunion Banner.

Subjects

  • New Salem (Mass.)--History
  • New Salem Academy (New Salem, Mass.)

Contributors

  • Vaughan, Ernest Howe

Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (Washington, D.C.)

PATCO Records, 1972-1981.

12 boxes (17 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 479

Established in 1968, PATCO was certified as the exclusive representative for all FAA air traffic controllers. A little more than a decade later, union members went on strike demanding better working conditions despite the fact that doing so was in violation of a law banning strikes by government unions. In response to the strike, the Reagan administration fired the strikers, more than 11,000, and decertified the union. Over time the union was eventually reformed, first in 1996 as an affiliate with the Federation of Physicians and Dentists union, and later as an independent, national union in 2004.

Correspondence, financial records, notes and memos documenting the activities of the Boston area branch of PATCO. Letters, announcements, and planning documents leading up to the 1981 strike shed light on the union’s position.

Subjects

  • Air traffic controlers--Labor unions
  • Collective bargaining--Aeronautics--United States
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Professional Air Traffic Controllers Organization (Washington, D.C.)

Regional Dairy Marketing Program

Regional Dairy Marketing Program Records, 1946-1960.

2 boxes (0.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 070

Founded in the 1940s, the Northeast Dairy Conference was “an association of more than 40 organizations of dairy farmers in thirteen states from Maine to West Virginia”. Its members, ranged from individual farmers and cooperatives to the Department of Agriculture and “state … Milk Control Boards.” “Hundreds of dairy plants and … thousands of workers” depending on them, the NDC devised numerous strategies to ensure the success of the “principle agricultural industry in the Northeast.” The Northeast Dairy Conference acted as “an agency of contact” for the dairy industry, a liaison between farmers and markets, state and federal departments. The most influential of the NDC strategies were its Cooperative Regional Projects. Funded by various state grants, the projects studied changing market patterns, production and consumption levels, as well as the worth of “non-fluid” milk.

The Regional Dairy Marketing Program collection contains meeting proceedings, annuals reports, research project statements, and detailed accounts of the Northeast Dairy Conference’s Cooperative Regional Projects from 1946 to 1960.

Subjects

  • Dairy products industry--New England--Marketing--History--20th century

Contributors

  • Northeast Dairy Conference

Service Employees International Union, Local 925 (Tufts University)

SEIU Local 925 (Tufts University) Records, 1978-1980.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 589
SEIU Local 925
SEIU Local 925

In October 1978 a group of clerical workers at Tufts united in an effort to organize their coworkers with Local 925, S.E.I.U. Isolated and scattered across campus, the clerical employees at the university greeted this call to unionize with support, hoping it would mean an improvement in salaries and in grievance procedures. By the summer of the following year, 60% of eligible employees signed authorization cards, more than required to vote on the issue, and an election early that fall was expected. Tufts administration, however, delayed the election by disputing the composition of the bargaining unit. Formal hearings took place from September through the end of the year, but instead of resolving the case, the Boston Labor Board referred it to Washington on January 25, 1980. Nine months later the election was finally held, but the results were not what were anticipated more than a year earlier. Rather than an easy victory to unionize, the majority of clerical staff at Tufts voted not to make Local 925 their exclusive bargaining representative. The administration’s anti-union campaign waged throughout 1979 and 1980 had a tremendous impact on the employees at the university, and a number of concessions made on wages, health insurance, and vacations further eroded support for organizing with Local 925.

The collection documents the efforts of Tufts clerical workers to unionize during 1978-1980. The group’s biweekly newsletter, Inside Tufts, written by the university’s employees and published by Local 925, offers an important behind-the-scenes look on two fronts: the issues and grievances of the clerical staff at Tufts and the reasons behind their decision to unionize. Materials relating to the efforts of other Boston-area institutions, in particular colleges and universities, are also included.

Subjects

  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Labor unions--Organizing

Contributors

  • Service Employees International Union. Local 925

St. Stanislaus Society (Tuners Falls, Mass.)

St. Stanislaus Society Records, 1959-1969.

2 vols. (0.15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 254 bd

Named for Polish saint Stanislaus Kostka, the St. Stanislaus Society of Turners Falls was most likely a part of a larger fraternal society, possibly the Polish Roman Catholic Union of America. Ethnic parishes and the fraternal societies that often sprang up around them, served as buffers between the customs and language immigrants brought with them and the new traditions and language they were expected to learn upon entering American society. Fraternal socities like St. Stanislaus offered members a place to celebrate their Polish heritage and Roman Catholic faith, while also assisting them with some of the more practical matters of living in a new country, such as securing life insurance and home mortgages.

Subjects

  • Fraternal organizations--Massachusetts
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts--Turners Falls
  • Turners Falls (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • St. Stanislaus Society (Tuners Falls, Mass.)

Types of material

  • Account books

Sunderland (Mass.)

Sunderland Town Records, 1620-1912.

4 reels (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 409 mf

Set off from neighboring Hadley in 1673, Swampfield, as it was known then, or Sunderland, as it is known now, was incorporated in 1718. Microfilm of the town’s records include lists of baptisms, marriages, deaths, as well as minutes of meetings.

Subjects

  • Sunderland (Mass.)--History

Thompson, William

William Thompson Account Book, 1861-1862.

1 folder (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 097

William Thompson’s 1861-1862 account of his business with George Dodge and Co., a general store in an unidentified town. Thompson bought everything from suspenders to fish, and indigo to K oil from Dodge.

Subjects

  • General stores--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Thompson, William

Types of material

  • Account books

Tucker, Mary E.

Mary E. Tucker Journal and Receipt book, ca.1854-1890.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 076 bd

The second child of attorney George J. Tucker and his first wife, Eunice, Mary E. Tucker was born in Lenox, Mass., ca.1835, and raised there with her elder brother Joseph and sisters Maria, Harriett, and Sarah. Mary died at a tragically young age on August 20, 1855. She is buried with her father and sister Maria in the town’s Church on the Hill Cemetery.

As small as the volume is, it is a complex book, consisting of two main parts, neither with certain authorship. Approximately the first third of the volume is comprised of brief notes on sermons delivered by Congregational minister Edmund K. Alden and other, 1854-1862, while the rest is a well-organized receipt book kept in a different hand. The receipts are arranged in sections devoted to bread and cake, soups, fish, meats, vegetables, pastry, puddings, other desserts, cake, preserves and jellies, miscellaneous, and pickles and sauces. Several recipes are attributed to other writers, including the well-known cookbook author Juliet Corson.

Subjects

  • Cooking, American--Massachusetts--Lenox
  • Lenox (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Sermons--Massachusetts--Lenox

Contributors

  • Alden, Edmund K.

Types of material

  • Cookbooks

U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission. Bureau of Valuation

U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission, Bureau of Valuation, Engineering Report upon the Boston and Maine Railroad Company, 1931.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 641

Chartered in 1835, the Boston and Maine Railroad was one of the largest and most successful railroad operations in northern New England for over a century, hauling both freight and passengers. The Railway began a slow decline as early as the 1930s with the decline in manufacturing in the region and later with the decline of passenger service. It came through a bankruptcy in 1970 and continues as a non-operating ward of Pan Am Railways.

This collection consists of blueprint valuations of the assets of the Boston and Maine Railroad, compiled by the Bureau of Valuation of the U.S. Interstate Commerce Commission in 1931.

Subjects

  • Boston and Maine Railroad
  • Railroads--New England

United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union

United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union Local 4 Records, 1945-1995.

10 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 415

The United Hatters, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union (UHCMW) was formed in 1934 by the merger of the United Hatters of North America and the Cloth Hat, Cap and Millinery Workers International Union, settling deep rifts between the competing unions. For five decades, the UHCMW organized the declining hat and millinery trade in the United States until it merged into the Amalgamated Clothing and Textile Workers Union (ACTWU) in 1983, which merged in 1995 into the International Ladies Garment Workers Union to form UNITE (Union of Needletrades, Industrial and Textile Employees).

The collection documents UHCMW Local 4, representing workers in Boston and Framingham, from 1945 through the time of its merger into the ACTWU. The series of ledgers and documents in the collection include documents concerning health and retirement benefits for union members, bargaining agreements, and financial records for the local, as well as a small assortment of correspondence, memoranda, and minutes of meetings.

Subjects

  • Hat trade--Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • United Hatters, Cap, and Millinery Workers International Union
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