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Burt V Brooks image of farmstead
Burt V Brooks image of family
Alton Blackington image of cat
Burt V Brooks image of young woman
Burt V Brooks image of dog on porch
Alton Blackington image of young woman
Burt Brooks image of young woman
Alton Blackington image of crystal gazer
Alton Blackington image of woman and parrot
Alton Blackington image of woman selling walnuts
Alton Blackington image of woman with feathered hat
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SCUA

Results for: “Vietnamese students--Massachusetts--Social life and customs” (1086 collections)SCUA

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New England Intercollegiate Lacrosse League

Finding aid

New England Intercollegiate Lacrosse League Records, 1893-1977.

9 boxes (5.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 331

When Charles Marsters founded the Boston Lacrosse Club in 1913, the club was the only one in New England to play teams from outside of the region. Under Marsters’s leadership, however, participation in the sport rose steadily at both the high school and collegiate level, helping establish New England as one of the centers of the American game. In 1935, he and Tom Dent founded the New England Intercollegiate Lacrosse League (NEILL) to continue to build the sport.

The NEILL records document the growth of lacrosse from informal club team play to a more regulated, interscholastic and intercollegiate varsity sport. The bulk of the collection consists of correspondence, minutes, and agendas kept by co-founder Charles Marsters and a handful of other NEILL officers, but with material documenting the growth of the sport at UMass Amherst from the 1950s onward and the addition of women’s lacrosse as a collegiate sport. The collection also includes some printed material (including rulebooks), news clippings, and photographs.

Subjects

  • College sports--New England
  • Lacrosse for women--United States
  • Lacrosse guide
  • Lacrosse--New England--History
  • School sports--New England
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Sports

Contributors

  • Boyden, Frank L. (Frank Learoyd), 1879-1972
  • Marsters, Charles E
  • New England Intercollegiate Lacrosse League

New England Labor and Community Network

Finding aid

New England Labor and Community Newsletters, 1979-1984.

1 envelope (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 202

Includes eleven of the thirteen newsletters published by the Labor and Community Network, a group of academics and trade unionists interested in labor issues in Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island.

Subjects

  • Labor--New England--Periodicals
  • New England--Social conditions--Periodicals
  • Working class--New England--Periodicals

Types of material

  • Newsletters

New England Post-War Marketing

Finding aid

New England Post-War Marketing Plans Collection, 1937-1950.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 083

Includes reports, addresses, articles, proposals, memos, and correspondence regarding post-war marketing plans in New England for agricultural products in general, and for dairy products in particular, including the Every Other Day Milk Delivery campaign.

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Economic aspects--New England--20th century
  • Dairy products--New England--Marketing--History--20th century
  • Farm produce--New England--Marketing--History--20th century
  • New England--Economic conditions--20th century

New England Telephone Workers’ Strike

Finding aid

New England Telephone Workers Strike Collection, 1989.

1 folder (0.15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 323

In 1989, almost 60,000 telephone workers in New England and New York waged a successful fifteen week strike against Nynex to protest a new contract that threatened cuts to medical benefits.

This small collection includes three handouts and a bulletin documenting the four-month labor strike carried out by New England telephone workers (represented by the Communications Workers of America and International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers unions) against the NYNEX corporation.

Subjects

  • NYNEX Corporation
  • New England--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Strikes and lockouts--Telephone companies--New England --History
  • Telephone companies--Employees--Labor unions--New England--History

Contributors

  • Communications Workers of America
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers

Types of material

  • Handbills

New York City Draft Riot

Finding aid

New York City Draft Riot Letter, 1863.

1 item (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 278

This letter, dated July 14, 1863 from New York, is addressed simply to “Brother.” The correspondent is unknown, as the letter is incomplete and consists only of a single sheet of paper. The subject of the letter is the ongoing draft riots in New York City, which began on July 13th and ended on July 16th. The rioters set fire to many businesses and homes, tore up railroad tracks and brought down telegraph lines during the three day ordeal.

Subjects

  • Draft Riot, New York, N.Y., 1863
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Norton (Mass.) & Mansfield (Mass.)

General Store Daybook, 1828-1839.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 203

The unidentified owner of the store was a general provisioner operating near the towns of Norton and Mansfield, Massachusetts. This daybook indicates that he or she bought and sold food, cloth, fuel, wood, shoes, paper goods, glassware, and iron. While the Norton Manufacturing Company (a textile manufacturer) was a steady customer, the storekeeper also dealt extensively with individuals in Norton.

Subjects

  • General stores--Massachusetts
  • Mansfield (Mass.)--History
  • Norton (Mass.)--History

Types of material

  • Account books

Norwegian Information Service

DigitalFinding aid

Norwegian Information Service Photographs of Sami (Lapp) People

1 envelope (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 297
Sami girls
Sami girls

During the Second World War, the Nazi occupation and subsequent liberation of the arctic regions of northern Norway resulted in the near total devastation of the existing infrastructure and the displacement of most of the population, including the native Sami (Lapps). The end of the war did not signal an end to hardship: the challenges of post-war resettlement was accompanied by a sustained effort by the Norwegian government to modernize and assimilate the Sami, largely through the systematic suppression of Sami culture. The language was banned from use in schools until 1958 and other forms of suppression persisted longer, and it was decades more before the rights of the Sami as an indigenous people were codified into law.

The dozen photographs that comprise this collection document Sami life in northern Norway during the period just after the end of the Second World War when Sami people were returning home after years as refugees. Taken by the Norwegian Information Service and presumably associated with the Norwegian modernization program, the collection includes images of traditional Sami sod dwellings, men at work on construction of sled and boat, and portraits of women and children.

Subjects

  • Dwellings--Norway--Photographs
  • General stores--Norway--Photographs
  • Sami (European people)--Photographs
  • Sleds--Norway--Photographs
  • Sod houses--Norway--Photographs
  • Tents--Norway--Photographs

Contributors

  • Norwegian Information Service

Types of material

  • Photographs

Norwich (Conn.) Ironmonger

Finding aid

Norwich (Conn.) Ironmonger's Account book, 1844-1847.

1 vol., 270p. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 540 bd

Straddling three rivers with easy access to Long Island Sound and the Atlantic, Norwich, Conn., was an important center during the mid-nineteenth century for the shipment of goods manufactured throughout eastern Connecticut.

Despite covering a limited period of time, primarily 1844 and 1845, the account book of an unidentified iron monger from Norwich (Conn.) provides insight into the activities of a highly active purveyor of domestic metal goods. The unidentified business carried a heavy trade in the sale or repair of iron goods, as well as items manufactured from tin, copper, and zinc, including stoves of several sorts (e.g., cooking, bricking, coal), ovens, pipes, kettles and coffee pots, ice cream freezers, lamps and lamp stands, reflectors, and more. The firm did business with individual clients as well as mercantile firms, corporations such as the Mill Furnace Co., organizations such as the Methodist Society, the city of Norwich and County of New London, and with local hotels.

Subjects

  • Hardware industry--Connecticut
  • Iron industry and trade--Connecticut
  • Norwich (Conn.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Stoves

Types of material

  • Account books

Olevsky, Julian, 1926-1985

Finding aid

Julian Olevsky Score Collection, 1898-1966.

2 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 438

Ranked amongst the great violinists of his generation, Julian Olevsky served as Professor of Violin at the University of Massachusetts Amherst from 1967-1985. The collection consists of annotated scores belonging to Julian Olevsky, the bulk of which contain parts for the violin and piano.

Subjects

  • Music--18th century
  • Music--19th century
  • Music--20th century
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Music and Dance

Contributors

  • Olevsky, Estela
  • Olevsky, Julian, 1926-1985

Opportunities

Jobs in SCUA

Child and dog, by Burt Brooks, ca.1910
Child and dog, by Burt V. Brooks, ca.1910

Every fall, SCUA offers a limited number of paid positions for undergraduates who wish to work in an active Special Collections or Library environment. Students should have an interest in writing and research, a passion for history and cultural heritage, a comfort with digital technologies, and a willingness to work collaboratively and collegially in an active and sometimes challenging setting.

In addition to these positions, SCUA regularly sponsors internships for either undergraduate or graduate students, from UMass Amherst and elsewhere. Taken for credit (and thus unpaid), these internships are designed to expose aspiring members of the profession to our daily work. As appropriate, internships can be adapted to the interests and needs of the individual student.

Because of the demand, hiring for SCUA positions usually takes place in the spring for students who wish to start in the fall, however positions occasionally open up mid-year. Please contact SCUA for more information.

Archival Training Program Student Assistanceships (April 2016)

Are you interested in exploring a future in history, cultural heritage, archives, libraries, or the information profession? The Library’s Department of Special Collections and University Archives, home to the papers of W.E.B. Du Bois, has openings for two Special Collections Archival Training Program Assistanceships to work with our team of professional archivists and graduate and undergraduate peers.

Two positions are available to undergraduate students from underrepresented populations in the archival profession (African American, Asian and Pacific Islander, Latino/a, and Native American). The students selected for these positions will have an opportunity to gain hands-on professional experience in the information field. Along with working with historical documents, audiovisual materials, and digital technologies, students in the Archival Training Program will assist researchers with their projects and will be responsible for their own research and writing projects.

Students will work a regular schedule of ten hours a week during the academic term.

For more information see the job posting at http://www.library.umass.edu/about-the-libraries/jobs/.

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