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Walz, Carl

Carl Walz v. Albert E. Clark et al.
1943
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 387 bd

In May 1942, Carl Walz was a tenured employee of the schools in the Montague, Massachusetts, teaching German to students in Millers Falls. In that month, with the United States having formally entered the Second World War, Walz was rejected for a contract renewal and dismissed. Although the School Committee claimed that Walz had been dismissed due to a “marked decrease” in demand for German, a non-required subject, and that his other courses were assigned to “higher priority” teachers, the key factor in his dismissal appears to have been his decision to register as a conscientious objector. Walz secured support from the Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union to sue the Montague School Committee for wrongful dismissal, however the outcome of his case has not been determined.

Walz’s suit against the Montague School District over his firing for being a conscientious objector was argyed in the Superior Court held in Greenfield in 1943. The 133p. typescript is a verbatim transcript of testimony given, including direct and cross-examination of members of the School Board, and re-direct and re-cross examination.

Subjects
  • Conscientious objectors--Massachusetts--Montague
  • Montague (Mass.)--History--20th century
  • Pacifists--Massachusetts--Montague
  • Teachers--Massachusetts--Montague
  • World War, 1939-1945
Types of material
  • Transcripts

Ward, Dana F.

Dana F. Ward Diaries
1897-1982 (Bulk: 1904-1951)
(2 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 577

Born in Chelsea, Mass., in 1874, and a long-time resident of Somerville, Dana F. Ward enjoyed a prominent career in the fisheries industry in Massachusetts. Entering the wholesale fish business in 1900 when he organized the firm of Whitman, Ward, and Lee, Ward became Director and Advertising Manager of the Boston Fish Market Corporation (builder and operator of the Fish Pier) and an investor. Before the U.S. entry into the First World War, Ward was employed by the state to lecture on the benefits of frozen fish as a food source. An active member in both the Congregational Church and local Masonic lodge, he married Katherine B. Symonds (d. 1948) in Leominster in October 1899.

Personal in nature, the Ward diaries provide a chronicle of the daily life of a relatively well to do fish wholesaler from 1897 through 1951, with some gaps. Generally small in size, the diaries are densely written and are laid in with letters, various sorts of documents, stamps, newsclippings, and other ephemera that help define the contours of Ward’s life. The collection is particularly rich for the years during the Second World War and it includes three diaries (1967, 1977, 1982) from later family members.

Acquired from Ben Katz, Nov. 2008
Subjects
  • Fisheries--Massachusetts
  • Somerville (Mass.)--History
Contributors
  • Ward, Dana F
Types of material
  • Diaries

Wells, Samuel

Samuel Wells Collection
1840-1843
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 225

In November 1840, the prominent New York mercantile firm, Josiah Macy and Son, contracted with Samuel Wells to act as an agent in leasing land in Hatfield, Mass., to mine barite. Wells, a resident of nearby Northampton, consulted with the renowned geologist Edward Hitchcock of Amherst College to locate the appropriate mining site, and then, over the next two years, he negotiated the leases and prepared for the start-up of mining. Ultimately, the presence of the lead ore galena rendered the barite unfit for use as a whitening agent.

The three dozen letters written to Samuel Wells, mostly by his employer Josiah Macy and Son, document the brief and ill-fated effort to start up a barite mine in Hatfield, Mass. Although some of the letters deal with the barite itself, most concern negotiations over locating the proper mine site and obtaining mineral rights and land leases.

Acquired from Charles Apfelbaum, 1989
Subjects
  • Barite mines and mining--Massachusetts--Hatfield
  • Hatfield (Mass.)--History
  • Lead mines and mining--Massachusetts--Hatfield
Contributors
  • Chase, G. C.
  • Hitchcock, Edward, 1793-1864
  • Josiah Macy and Son

WGBY

WGBY Photograph Collection
1981-1996
3 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: PH 032

Television station WGBY began broadcasting in Springfield, Massachusetts, in May 1955, as the public television station for the residents of the Pioneer Valley and western Massachusetts. Owned by Boston’s WGBH, the station produces its own original content and maintains its own web presence.

The WGBY collection consists entirely of photographic stills sent to the station for use in promoting its broadcasts. Featured artists include a number of actors and musicians popular during the 1980s and 1990s, including Judy Collins, Ruby Dee and Ossie Davis, the Three Tenors, and Oprah Winfrey. Most of the shows represented were produced or distributed by PBS.

Subjects
  • Public television
Types of material
  • Photographs

Whitaker, Elizabeth W.

Elizabeth W. Whitaker Collection
1802-1989
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 682
Image of Gravestone, No. Guilford, Conn.
Gravestone, No. Guilford, Conn.

A physical education teacher from Rome, New York, Elizabeth W. Whitaker became an avid recorder of gravestone inscriptions in the 1940s. She died in 1992 at the age of 93.

The core of the Whitaker collection consists of 25 receipts and accounts relating to the early marble industry in western Massachusetts. The key figures in this series are Rufus Willson and his father-in-law, John Burghardt, who quarried stone near West Stockbridge, Mass., conveying it to Hudson, N.Y. The collection also includes a selection of photographs and postcards of gravestones, mostly in New England and New York; two folders of typed transcriptions and newspaper clippings of epitaphs from the same region, ranging in date from the early colonial period to the mid-19th century; and a price list of Barre granite from Wetmore and Morse Granite Co., 1934.

Subjects
  • Gravestones--Massachusetts
  • Marble industry and trade--Massachusetts
Contributors
  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Burghardt, John
  • Whitaker, Elizabeth W
  • Willson, Rufus
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Receipts (Financial records)

Wilson, John S.

John S. Wilson Collection
1970-1983
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 858
Image of Amos Foster stone, 1793, New Salem Cemetery
Amos Foster stone, 1793, New Salem Cemetery

As an undergraduate at UMass Amherst, John S. Wilson undertook of study of gravestones in New Salem, Mass. Working under George Armelagos, he receiving a BA in Anthropology with honors (1971) for his work on the “social dimension of New England mortuary art,” and returned for an MA in (1976). Wilson later worked as Regional Historic Preservation Officer and Archaeologist for the Northeast Region of the US Fish and Wildlife Service.

Part of the collections of the Association for Gravestone Studies, the collection includes two copies of John Wilson’s senior honors thesis, a card file associated with the thesis, and several dozen slides (both color and black and white) of New Salem headstones. Some images appear to be later prints of images taken in 1970-1971.

Subjects
  • Gravestones--Massachusetts--New Salem
  • New Salem (Mass.)--History
Types of material
  • Photographs

Women Against Garage (WAG)

WAG Records
1995-2002
2 boxes (3 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 530

Informally referring to themselves as WAGs (Women Against Garage), Fay Kaynor, Mary Snyder, Merrylees Turner, and Mary Wentworth, opposed the building of a parking garage in the center of Amherst. Together they collected newspaper clippings, reports, minutes of meetings, and flyers that tell both sides of the story, but in particular shed light on the motivations of those opposed to the garage, concerns not well represented in the local paper, the Amherst Bulletin, at the time. Potential problems raised by garage opponents focused on the environmental issues that added traffic in Amherst would introduce, as well as the financial impact both on the town, if the revenues from the garage did not cover the investment or maintenance costs, and on locally-owned businesses that might not be able to afford higher rents if property values near the garage increased significantly.

Subjects
  • Amherst (Mass.)--Politics and government
Contributors
  • Kaynor, Fay
  • Snyder, Mary
  • Turner, Merrylees
  • Wentworth, Mary L

Yiamouyiannis, John

John Yiamouyannis Papers
1967-1999
22 boxes (33 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 645

One of the most prominent and vocal scientific critics of fluoridation, the biochemist John Yiamouyiannis (1943-2000) spent over three decades fighting the professional and political establishment. A graduate of the University of Chicago with a doctorate in biochemistry from the University of Rhode Island (1967), Yiamouyiannis became interested in the health effects of fluoride while employed as an editor with the Chemical Abstracts Service. His growing opposition to fluoridation, however, led to conflict with his employers and after being placed on probation in 1972, he resigned. Becoming a key organizer in the antifluoridation movement, he served at various times as the Executive Director of Health Action, the Science Director of the National Health Federation, founder and president of the Safe Water Foundation, and editor of the journal Fluoride. He also ran for the Senate from Ohio and twice for the U.S. Presidency on small party tickets, never garnering more than a handful of votes. Yiamouyiannis died of cancer at his home in Delaware, Ohio, on Oct. 8, 2000, at the age of 53.

Offering important insight into the antifluoridation movement in the 1970s through 1990s, the papers of John Yiamouyiannis offer a perspective on an unusually prolific and determined activist. The collection contains a large quantity of research material and correspondence relating to Yiamouyiannis’s antifluoridation work, and perhaps most importantly an extensive series of transcripts relating to civil cases in which he was involved.

Gift of Paul Connett, June 2012
Subjects
  • Antifluoridation movement
  • Drinking water--Law and legislation--United States
  • Fluorides--Physiological effect
  • Fluorides--Toxicology
Contributors
  • Yiamouyannis, John

Zusman, Susan

Susan Zusman Papers
1981-2000
4 boxes (6 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 966

After undergraduate work at Brandeis, the geneticist Susan Zusman became the first graduate student in the Princeton lab of Eric Wieschaus, the future Nobel laureate. Beginning in 1981, Zusman studied the early development in Drosophila by inducing mutations in genes used in gastrulation, using genetic mosaics and gynandromorphs. After completing her degree in 1987, she went on to a post-doctoral project in Paul Schedl’s lab, also at Princeton, using antibodies to determine the location of the dorsal protein in Drosophila embryos, and then moved to a three-year Howard Hughes Postdoctoral Associate at the Cancer Institute at MIT (1988-1991), working with Richard Hynes to explore the function of extracellular matrix molecules and integrins in Drosophila. She subsequently joined the faculty at the University of Rochester before leaving for positions in industry. After leaving Rochester in 1998, she served as Executive Director of Functional Genomics for Novartis then, in 2002, became a founder and CEO of Genetic Services, Inc.

The Zusman collection documents one woman’s successful career in Drosohpila studies. Beginning with some materials from her undergraduate program, the collection includes notes, drafts, photographs (both technical and personal), and data generated in her studies, reflecting much of the modern development of embryological and genetic techniques prior to the impact of gene sequencing. There is relatively little content from her time in industry.

Gift of Susan Zusman, March 2017
Subjects
  • Developmental biology
  • Drosophila--Development
  • Drosophila--Genetics
  • Genetics
  • Wieschaus, Eric F.
  • Women in science

Aczel, Tamas

Tamas Aczel Papers
ca.1950-1994
18 boxes (26 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 031

Born on Dec. 1, 1921, to a middle class family, Tamas Aczel became affiliated with leftist politics in Hungary prior to the Second World War, joining the Party after. With degrees in literature from Peter Pazmany University (BA 1948) and Eotvos Lorent University (MA 1950), Aczel quickly established a reputation as a literary talent, publishing seven novels and winning the Kossuth Prize (1949) and Stalin Prize for Literature (1952). During this period, he became disenchanted with the Communist government and during the short-lived rebellion in 1956, he served as press secretary for Prime Minister Imre Nagy. When Nagy was deposed, Aczel escaped through Yugoslavia to Austria and then England. In 1966, he was invited to teach modern European literature at UMass, where he became Director of the MFA program (1978-1982). Aczel died in 1994, leaving his wife Olga A. Gyarmati (an Olympic gold medalist in the long jump, 1948) and son Thomas.

The Aczel collection consists primarily of numerous drafts of several novels, including The Hunt (1990), Illuminations (1981), and Ice Age (1965), along with other writing, translations, some student essays, and autobiographical material. Some material is in Hungarian.

Subjects
  • Authors--Massachusetts
  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
  • Aczel, Tamas
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