SCUA
Alton Blackington, Cleo the monkey Alton Blackington, Woman with parrot Blackinton, Woman with feathered hat Alton Blackington image

Special Collections and University Archives|UMass Amherst LibrariesAsk us a question

Search collections

Browse collections

Digital

Results for: “Women in missionary work--Massachusetts--Enfield--History” (1032 collections)SCUA

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 89
  5. 90
  6. 91
  7. 92
  8. 93
  9. 94
  10. 95
  11. ...
  12. 104

Ludwig, Allan I.

Allan I. Ludwig Collection, 1956-1966.

10 boxes (10 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 034

An historian and photographer, Allan I. Ludwig’s book Graven Images: New England Stonecarving and Its Symbols, 1650-1815 (1966) played a critical role in the rise in interest in gravestone studies in the 1960s. Born in Yonkers, N.Y., in 1933, Ludwig received his PhD in art history from Yale in 1964 and became involved with the Association for Gravestone Studies beginning with the initial Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife in 1976. He received the AGS Forbes Award in 1980 in recognition of his contributions to gravestone studies. He has been a professor of art history at Dickinson College, Bloomfield College, Rhode Island School of Design, Yale University, and Syracuse University. In addition to his books Reflections Out of Time: A Portfolio of Photographs (1981) and Repulsion: Aesthetics of the Grotesque (1986), Ludwig has curated numerous art exhibitions and exhibited his own photographs worldwide.

The Ludwig Collection consists of many hundreds of photographs of New England and English gravemarkers organized either by the deceased’s name or by the town, as well as copies of all photos used in Graven Images. Also included in the collection is a copy of Ludwig’s dissertation on gravestone iconography and offprints of several of his articles.

Subjects

  • Gravestones--New England

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Ludwig, Allan I

Types of material

  • Photographs

Manuscript collections

Geisha, from the Benjamin Smith Lyman Papers
Geishas,
from Benjamin Smith Lyman Papers

The Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects and preserves textual, visual, and auditory materials of enduring historical value and makes them available to researchers at no charge.

The collections held by SCUA are rich and deeply interrelated, documenting four areas of historic and cultural interest: social change, New England, the University of Massachusetts, and innovation and entrepreneurship. Among other significant collections are the papers of:

  • W.E.B. Du Bois and Horace Mann Bond (African American intellectuals and activists)
  • Kenneth R. Feinberg (attorney and public figure)
  • Congressman Silvio E. Conte and John Olver, and Sen. Stanley Rosenberg (politicians)
  • Benjamin Smith Lyman, William Smith Clark, and William Penn Brooks (natural scientists)
  • Mark H. McCormack and Sidney Topol (innovators)
  • William Lederer, Leonard Lewin, Jodi Picoult, Harvey Swados, Charles Whipple (writers)
  • Carl Oglesby, Mary Wentworth, Randy Kehler, the Liberation News Service, and the Alternative Energy Alliance (activists)

Information about all of our manuscript and photographic collections is included in UMarmot. Use the search box and menus to the right to navigate our collections and to locate collections of interest.

Learn more about:

:: What SCUA collects
:: Research guides
:: Policies for use of the collections

Maslow, Jonathan Evan

Jonathan Evan Maslow Papers, ca.1978-2008.

20 boxes (30 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 639
Jon Maslow
Jon Maslow

A man of diverse and interests, Jon Maslow was a naturalist and journalist, an environmentalist, traveler, and writer, whose works took his from the rain forests to the steppes to the salt marshes of his native New Jersey. Born on Aug. 4, 1948, in Long Branch, Maslow received his MA from the Columbia University School of Journalism (1974), after which he spent several years traveling through South and Central America, studying the flora and fauna, reporting and writing, before returning to the States. Always active in community affairs, he was a reporter with the Cape May County Herald (1997-2002) and the West Paterson Herald News (2002-2008). The author of six books, including The Owl Papers (1983), Bird of Life, Bird of Death, a finalist for the National Book Award in 1986, and Sacred Horses: Memoirs of a Turkmen Cowboy (1994), he often combined an intense interest in natural history with a deep environmentalist ethos and, particularly in the latter two cases, with a deep concern for the history of political turmoil. He died of cancer on Feb. 19, 2008.

A large and rich assemblage, the Maslow Papers document his career from his days as a young journalist traveling in Central America through his community involvements in New Jersey during the 2000s. An habitual rewriter, Maslow left numerous drafts of books and articles, and the collection includes valuable correspondence with colleagues and friends, including his mentor Philip Roth, as well as Maslow’s fascinating travel diaries.

Subjects

  • Authors--New Jersey
  • Central America--Description and travel
  • Journalists--New Jersey
  • New Jersey--History
  • Reporters and reporting--New Jersey

Contributors

  • Maslow, Jonathan Evan
  • Roth, Philip

Mayants, Lazar, 1912-

Lazar Mayants Papers, 1941-2003.

2 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 009

Born in Gomel, Russia in 1912, Lazar Mayants earned a PhD in chemistry (1941) from the Karpov Institute for Physical Chemistry and a Doctor of Science in physics and mathematics (1947) at the Lebedev Institute for Physics (FIAN), both in Moscow. With primary research interests in theoretical molecular spectroscopy, applied linear algebra, quantum physics, probability theory and statistics, and the philosophy of science, he began his career as Professor and Chair of the Theoretical and General Physics Departments at Ivanovo, Saratov, and Smolensk Universities in Russia. Mayants came to University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1981 as a visiting professor, becoming an Adjunct in 1987. He taught at UMass for over six years, often forgoing a paycheck as a result of decreased funding in the sciences. He remained in Amherst until his death in November 2002.

The Mayants Papers are comprised of professional correspondence, drafts of articles, personal and financial records, and notes for research and teaching. Mayants’s dissertation from the Lebedev Institute for Physics is also included with the collection.

Subjects

  • Physics--Research
  • Quantum theory
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics

Contributors

  • Mayants, Lazar, 1912-

Miles, Manly, 1826-1898

Manly Miles Papers, ca.1882-1886.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 134
Manly Miles
Manly Miles

A pioneer in scientific agriculture, Manly Miles was born in Homer, N.Y., in 1826. A naturalist by inclination with a strong practical streak, Miles took a degree in medicine at Rush Medical College (1850) and practiced as a physician for eight years. His interests in the natural sciences, however, soon left him to abandon medicine, and after accepting a position with the State Geological Survey in Michigan from 1858-1861, he turned to academia. An early member of the faculty at Michigan State College, and later Illinois State College, he was recruited to the agricultural faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College by President Paul Chadbourne in 1882. Four years later, however, following Chadbourne’s untimely death, Miles returned to Lansing, Mich., where he remained until his death in 1898. During his career, he was noted for his interests in organic evolution and plant and animal breeding.

The Miles collection contains 8 notebooks containing notes on reading. In addition to a general notebook on scientific matters, the remaining seven are organized by subject: Breeds of animals, Farm buildings, Farm economy, Feeding and animals, Implements, Manures, and Stock breeding.

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Study and teaching
  • Animal breeding
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts State College. Department of Agricultural Economics

Contributors

  • Miles, Manly, 1826-1898

Types of material

  • Notebooks

Morehouse, Ward, 1929-

Ward Morehouse Papers, ca.1950-2012.

120 boxes (180 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 764

A writer, educator, and activist for human rights and social justice, Ward Morehouse was a prominent critic of corporate power and globalization. Raised in a family of progressive political economists and academics in Wisconsin, Morehouse began his research in international political economy while a student at Yale (BA 1950, MA 1953) and embarked on a standard academic career path. After teaching political science at New York University for a time, he became director of international education at the Center for International and Comparative Studies in 1963, building a particularly strong program in India. However in 1976, conservative opposition to his political views led Morehouse to leave for a new post as president of the Council on International and Public Affairs (CIPA), a human rights organization he had helped found twenty years before. Throughout, he remained an activist at heart. Galvanized by the 1984 industrial disaster in Bhopal, India, he organized the International Campaign for Justice in Bhopal, and went on to form or work with many other organizations seeking to resist corporate power and build democracy, including the Program on Corporations, Law and Democracy (POCLAD) and the Permanent People’s Tribunal, operating the radical Apex Press. Morehouse died in June 2012 at the age of 83.

The Morehouse collection is a massive archive documenting six decades of research, writing, and activism. A prolific writer and editor, Morehouse left a deep record of his activities, his research and writing on corporate power, and the full breadth of his commitments in labor relations, alternative economics, “people’s law,” and peace.

Subjects

  • Anti-globalization movement
  • Bhopal Union Carbide Plant Disaster, Bhopal, India, 1984
  • Economics
  • India--Economic conditions

Contributors

  • Apex Press
  • Center for International and Comparative Studies
  • Council on International and Public Affairs
  • Permanent Peoples' Tribunal
  • Program on Corporations, Law and Democracy

MSC Glee Club

Doric Alviani
Doric Alviani (kneeling) and student choir.

Doric Alviani’s arrival at Massachusetts State College invigorated the arts and within two years of his arrival, resulted in the formation of a number of vocal groups. In about 1940, Alviani’s Massachusetts State College Glee Club made a series of recordings on 78 rpm disks of popular college songs.

Title: (Old Massachusetts) Alma Mater
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Title: Dear Old Massachusetts
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Title: Evening Hymn
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Note: Recording very faint
Title: Fight Song
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Title: Jolly Students
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Title: Victory — Farewell to Bay State
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3
Title: When Twilight Shadows Deepen
Date: ca.1940
Coverage: Amherst, Massachusetts
Filetype: mp3

Musicians United for Safe Energy

MUSE Records, ca.1980-1989.

19 boxes (28.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 521

Musicians United for Safe Energy (MUSE), an activist organization opposing the use of nuclear energy, was founded in 1979 by Jackson Browne, Graham Nash, Bonnie Raitt, and John Hall. The MUSE Foundation was established with the proceeds of the concerts and for several years provided small grants to support antinuclear and environmental work.

The bulk of the MUSE collection consists of applications from grass-roots, progressive organizations in the United States relating to their work. As such, the collection presents a wonderful snapshot of early 1980s activisim. The collection is part of the Famous Long Ago Archive.

Subjects

  • Activists--United States
  • Antinuclear movement--United States

Contributors

  • Musicians United for Safe Energy

National Arts Policy Archive & Library (NAPAAL)

National Arts Policy Archive and Library, 1965-2013.


The National Arts Policy Archive and Library is a collaborative project initiated by SCUA, the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, and several partners in arts agencies intended to document the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state-level and national arts agencies, NAPAAL will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.

Constituent collections include:

Subjects

  • Art and state
  • Arts--Management
  • Government aid to the arts

Contributors

  • Americans for the Arts
  • National Asssembly of State Arts Agencies
  • National Endowment for the Arts

Natural Farmer

The Natural Farmer, 1999-2005.

26 items (digital)
Call no.: Digital

Published quarterly by the Northeast Organic Farming Association, The Natural Farmer is a widely circulated newspaper devoted to the support of organic farming. These files are made available courtesy of the editors, Jack Kittredge and Julie Rawson of NOFA Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Farming--United States
  • Organic farmers
  • Organic farming

Contributors

  • Northeast Organic Farming Association
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 89
  5. 90
  6. 91
  7. 92
  8. 93
  9. 94
  10. 95
  11. ...
  12. 104