Search results for '“Feminists--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity--History”' (page 91 of 104) • SCUA • UMass Amherst Libraries

Special Collections and University Archives|UMass Amherst LibrariesAsk us a question

We are SCUA

Search collections

  • Collection areas

Browse collections

[ UMass ]

Digital

Results for: “Feminists--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity--History” (1038 collections)SCUA

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 88
  5. 89
  6. 90
  7. 91
  8. 92
  9. 93
  10. 94
  11. ...
  12. 104

Law and Society Association

Law and Society Association Records, ca.1964-2011.

24 boxes (36 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 769

Founded in 1964, the Law and Society Association is an interdisciplinary organization bringing together scholars interested in the place of law in social, political, economic and cultural life. Founded by Harry Ball, then based in Madison, Wisc., the association began publishing the Law and Society Review in 1966 and has held its first national meeting in 1975. The executive offices were located at UMass Amherst from 1987 to 2012 under the aegis or Ronald Pipkin of the Program in Legal Studies.

The records of the Law and Society Association include materials relating to former editors of the Law and Society Review, as well as early conferences and summer institutes. Among the notable figures in the field of sociolegal studies represented in the collection are Marc Galanter and Jack Ladinsky.

Subjects

  • Law--Social aspects

Contributors

  • Galanter, Marc, 1931-
  • Ladinsky, Jack

Le, Van Khoa

DigitalFinding aid

Le Van Khoa Photograph Collection, Undated.

7 items (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 170
Going home
Going home

The composer, photographer, and educator, Le Van Khoa arrived in the United States as a war refugee from Vietnam in May 1975. Largely self-taught as a photographer, he was co-founder of the Artistic Photography Association of Vietnam and has published three books of his work. He holds the distinction of being the first Vietnamese photographer to mount an exhibition at the U.S. Congress building.

The seven photographs in the Le Van Khoa collection are artistic reflections of life in Vietnam, including four taken in the imperial city, Hue.

Subjects

  • Vietnam--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photographs

Lederer, William J., 1912-

Finding aid

William Lederer Papers, ca. 1930-1985.

91 boxes (61 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 158
William Lederer in naval uniform
William Lederer in naval uniform

William J. Lederer began his long career in the Navy in 1930. During his twenty-eight years of service he traveled throughout Asia on some 30 trips, acquiring several books worth of experience, criticisms, and insight. In 1948, Lederer attended the Bread Loaf Writer’s Conference in Vermont and met fellow author and political theorist Eugene Burdick. Disillusioned with the style and substance of America’s diplomatic efforts in Southeast Asia, Lederer and Burdick openly sought to demonstrate their belief that American officials and civilians could make a substantial difference in Southeast Asian politics if they were willing to learn local languages, follow local customs and employ regional military tactics. Together they co-authored two widely influential books, The Ugly American (1958) and Sarkhan (1965).

The collection includes materials related to most of his major publications including, A Nation of Sheep, The Ugly American, Sarkhan, Our Own Worst Enemy, I, Giorghos, Mirages of Marriage, and Martial Choices. A substantial series of correspondence traces Lederer’s associations and communications throughout his entire career. Area files, research materials, and photographs are also include, but not yet fully processed.

Subjects

  • Southeast Asia--Economic conditions
  • Southeast Asia--Politics and government--1945-
  • United States--Foreign relations
  • United States--Politics and government--1945-
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Contributors

  • Burdick, Eugene
  • Lederer, William J., 1912-

Types of material

  • Photographs

Lewis, David L., 1936-

David Levering Lewis Papers, ca.1955-2012.

54 boxes (81 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 827
David Levering Lewis
David Levering Lewis

The historian David Levering Lewis is the author of eight remarkably diverse monographs. Raised in an academic family, his father was president of Morris Brown College, Lewis enrolled at Fisk University at the age of 15 and was only 26 when he was awarded a doctorate in modern European history from the London School of Economics (1962). Through an academic career that has included numerous stops, including Morgan State, Notre Dame, Howard, the University of the District of Columbia (1970-1980), and Rutgers (1985-2003), Lewis remained consistently productive. Author of the first academic biography of Martin Luther King (1970) and a history of the Dreyfus Affair (1974), he wrote an influential study of the Harlem renaissance (1981) and important works on colonialism in Africa (1987) and Islamic Spain (2008), but he is best known for his two monumental biographies of W.E.B. Du Bois (1993, 2000), each of which was awarded a Pulitzer Prize. One of the most lauded African American historians of his generation, Lewis was recipient of the Bancroft Prize, the Francis Parkman Prizes, the 2009 National Humanities Medal, and a MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, and he was elected as a Fellow of both the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and the American Philosophical Society. Lewis was Julius Silver University Professor in History at New York University from 2003 until his retirement.

The papers of David Levering Lewis document a long and productive career as an academic historian and scholar of African American history and culture. Beginning with his years in college and graduate school, the collection offers a rich perspective on the evolution of his career. Lewis’s essential biographies of W.E.B. Du Bois are particularly well documented, however the collection includes abundant materials for each of his earlier projects, including correspondence, research notes, and drafts.

Subjects

  • African Americans--History
  • Colonies--Africa--History
  • Du Bois, W. E. B. (William Edward Burghardt), 1868-1963
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • Historians--United States
  • King, Martin Luther, Jr., 1929-1968
  • United States--History--20th century

Types of material

  • Photographs

Lewis, Gertrude Minnie, 1896-

Finding aid

Gertrude M. Lewis Papers, ca.1920-2001.

6 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 096
Gertrude
Gertrude "Jean" Lewis, ca.1935

Overcoming a deeply impoverished childhood, Gertrude Lewis struggled to build a career in education, putting herself through college and graduate school. At the age of 32, she earned a bachelor’s degree from Ohio State, continuing on to a masters degree at New York University (1933), and finally, at age 51, a PhD from Yale (1947). For many years after receiving her doctorate, Lewis was employed as a Specialist for Upper Grades with the U.S. Office of Education in Washington. Among other career highlights, Lewis spent two years in Japan (1950-1951) as a Consultant in Elementary Education in the Education Section of the Allied Occupation government (SCAP). Lewis outlived her life partner, Ruth Totman, dying at home on December 10, 1996, a few months after her one hundredth birthday.

The Lewis Papers document the work and life of an educator of the masses, a traveler of the world, and a woman of the twentieth century. Documents pertaining to her work as an educator of both young students and veteran teachers show the changes within the theory and practice of pedagogy over time, over various geographic locales, and also highlight her role in that change. This collection also documents the numerous on-going side projects on which Lewis worked, including fostering creativity in schoolchildren, a biography of Franklin D. and Eleanor Roosevelt, and her own poetry and prose.

Subjects

  • Education, Elementary--Japan
  • Education, Elementary--United States--History
  • Education--Evaluation
  • Education--United States--History
  • Health Education--United States
  • Japan--Civilization--American influences
  • Students--Health and hygiene

Contributors

  • Lewis, Gertrude Minnie, 1896-
  • Totman, Conrad D
  • Totman, Ruth J

Types of material

  • Motion pictures (Visual work)
  • Photographs

Ludwig, Allan I.

Allan I. Ludwig Collection, 1956-1966.

10 boxes (10 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 034

An historian and photographer, Allan I. Ludwig’s book Graven Images: New England Stonecarving and Its Symbols, 1650-1815 (1966) played a critical role in the rise in interest in gravestone studies in the 1960s. Born in Yonkers, N.Y., in 1933, Ludwig received his PhD in art history from Yale in 1964 and became involved with the Association for Gravestone Studies beginning with the initial Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife in 1976. He received the AGS Forbes Award in 1980 in recognition of his contributions to gravestone studies. He has been a professor of art history at Dickinson College, Bloomfield College, Rhode Island School of Design, Yale University, and Syracuse University. In addition to his books Reflections Out of Time: A Portfolio of Photographs (1981) and Repulsion: Aesthetics of the Grotesque (1986), Ludwig has curated numerous art exhibitions and exhibited his own photographs worldwide.

The Ludwig Collection consists of many hundreds of photographs of New England and English gravemarkers organized either by the deceased’s name or by the town, as well as copies of all photos used in Graven Images. Also included in the collection is a copy of Ludwig’s dissertation on gravestone iconography and offprints of several of his articles.

Subjects

  • Gravestones--New England

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Ludwig, Allan I

Types of material

  • Photographs

McIntosh, Beatrice A.

Beatrice A. McIntosh Cookery Collection, ca.1880-2005.

ca.8,000 items (200 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 395

The McIntosh Cookery Collection includes books, pamphlets, and ephemera relating to the history of cookery in New England. Of particular note are nearly 7,500 cookbooks prepared by community organizations from the 1880s to the present, usually for fund-raising or charitable purposes. These cookbooks were produced by a variety of organizations, including parent-teacher groups, churches and synagogues, social service agencies, private clubs, and historical societies as fund-raising projects.

These cookbooks document important aspects of the lives of families and women in the region, as well as ethnic groups and their adaptation of traditional foods to New England. The collection is focused primarily on New England, but includes cookbooks from other states for comparative purposes.

Subjects

  • Community cookbooks
  • Cookbooks
  • Cookery--New England

Memory Corps

Too often recorded history is made up only of dates and facts, famous people and famous places. The memories that mean the most to most of us — the individuals who truly make a community what it is — can be overlooked or forgotten. The University Archives has sought to capture the memories of alumni, hoping to create a richer picture of our shared past. Through brief interviews with interested alumni, the Memory Corps project hopes to gather the stories of life at UMass and lives before and since.

Class of 1961
Gail CroteauGail Croteau
Class of 1961

“The interesting thing was at that time the women on campus were used I think to a certain extent to control the young men who had come because we had to be in at 7:00 at night for the first eight weeks, and I think the thinking was that if we were in then the boys wouldn’t get into as much trouble. But I’m sure if that worked or not.”

Chester Gallup

Chester Gallup
Class of 1961

“It didn’t seem crowded; it seemed kind of rural really and I like that part about it.”

Ronald Trudeau

Ronald Trudeau
Class of 1961

“I was scared to death. There were beanies back in those days and so you sure got identified, and I got hazed a little bit by the upperclassmen, but all good naturedly and friendly too… if it wasn’t for the friends on the floor…those kids all were scared, too, and it was great support.”

James Lavin

James Lavin
Class of 1961

“It was interesting, because when we came here they gave us little beanies we had to wear and cardboard placards and we felt kind of funny, embarrassed at times, however, everyone on campus was so friendly as if they’d been doing this for years…so it was a welcoming campus.”

Miller, Cynthia

Finding aid

Cynthia Miller Papers, 1973-1995.

6 boxes (2.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 869

Known in the psychiatric survivors’ movement as Kalisa, Cynthia Miller was a radical activist on behalf of the mentally ill. An ex-patient based in New York, she became a member of Project Release in the early 1970s, one of the first wave of organizations fighting for the civil rights of mental patients and combatting forced institutionalization, and was a contributor to Madness Network News and other publications. A poet, writer, and a committed feminist and out lesbian, she took part in civil disobedience to oppose electroconvulsive therapy, working with Judi Chamberlin, George Ebert, Leonard Roy Frank, and others.

Though varied and fragmentary, Cynthia Miller’s collection is a rich resource for study of the early history of the psychiatric survivors movement and the work of one activist in resisting psychiatric oppression. The collection contains some of Kalisa’s writings and correspondence along with ephemera and a varied collection of newspapers, newsletters, and other publications relating to Project Release and several other organizations that Kalisa supported, including the Mental Patients Liberation Front and the Alliance for the Liberation of Mental Patients.

Subjects

  • Electroconvulsive therapy
  • Feminism
  • Mentally ill--Civil rights
  • Psychiatric survivors movement--New York (City)

Contributors

  • Alliance for the Liberation of Mental Patients
  • Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010
  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Project Release

Types of material

  • Newsletters

Morris, William, 1834-1896

Finding aid

William Morris, The friendship of Amis and Amile, ca.1894.

1 item (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 362 bd

A leader in the English Arts and Crafts movement, William Morris translated the ancient French romance, Amis and Amile, in 1894, one of a number of romances he published in his literary efforts to restore the middle ages.

This holograph copy of Morris’s short story was prepared for the Kelmscott Press in 1894 and printed in a run of 500. The first American edition appeared later that year, published by Thomas Bird Mosher.

Subjects

  • Kelmscott Press

Contributors

  • Morris, William, 1834-1896

Types of material

  • Holographs (Autographs)
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 88
  5. 89
  6. 90
  7. 91
  8. 92
  9. 93
  10. 94
  11. ...
  12. 104