Results for: “University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students” (958 collections)SCUA

Small, Eugene B.

Eugene B. Small Papers, 1964-2007.

7 boxes (10.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 591

Specializing in study of the biology and evolutionary history of ciliophorans, Eugene B. Small conducted both laboratory and field studies in comparative morphology and morphogenesis, ciliate ecology, phylogeny, life history, and nutrition. He was particularly noted for his work on ciliophorans from marine habitats ranging from the psammitic shores to the pelagic zones to deep sea hydrothermal vents. After receiving his doctorate at UCLA in 1964, Small served on the Zoology faculty at the University of Illinois and, from 1972, in the Department of Biology at the University of Maryland.

The collection consists primarily of thousands of electron micrographs of ciliophorans taken over the course of Small’s career, along with a small number of laboratory and field notebooks.

Subjects

  • Ciliata
  • Evolution (Biology)
  • University of Maryland--Faculty

Contributors

  • Small, Eugene B

Types of material

  • Laboratory notes
  • Scanning electron micrographs

Social Change Collection

Social Change Collection, 1953-1980.

4 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 457

Miscellaneous manuscripts and documents relating to the history and experience of social change in America. Among other things, the collection includes material relating to the peace and antiwar movements during the 1960s, the conflict in Vietnam, and the Students for a Democratic Society (SDS).

Subjects

  • Anti-imperialist movements
  • Peace movements
  • Students for a Democratic Society (U.S.)
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--Massachusetts

Strong, John D.

John D. Strong Papers, 1938-1986.

10 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 019
John D. Strong
John D. Strong

John D. Strong was a professor of Physics and Astronomy from 1967 to 1975 and served as the head of the laboratory of astrophysics and physical meteorology. Strong, one of the world’s foremost optical scientists, was known for being the first to detect water vapor in the atmosphere of Venus and for developing a number of innovations in optical devices, ranging from improved telescope mirrors to anti-reflective coatings for optical elements and diffraction gratings. Born in Riverdale, Kansas in 1905, Strong received degrees from the University of Kansas (BA 1926) and the University of Michigan (M.S., 1928, Ph.D., 1930). After twelve years at CalTech and wartime research at Harvard on infrared systems, Strong became professor and director of the Astrophysical and Physical Meteorology Laboratories at Johns Hopkins University in 1946, where, among many other projects, he conducted research on balloon astronomy for the Office of Naval Research (ONR). Strong published hundreds of papers throughout his career and was author of Procedures of Experimental Physics, a standard physics textbook for many years. Strong served as president of the American Optical Association in 1959 and patented numerous inventions for optics in spectroscopy as well as golf (see US Patent no. 3720467). Strong passed away in 1992.

The Strong Papers contain forty years of research notebooks in experimental physics (1930-1970) centered on Strong’s years at Johns Hopkins (1946-1967), along with correspondence, printed publications by Strong for the ONR, and manuscripts for several textbooks (though lacking material on Procedures of Experimental Physics). Strong’s balloon work is documented by diagrams in his lab books and photographs of the Stratolab at John’s Hopkins, and an oral history of his life was made by the Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in 1985, a transcript of which is included in the collection.

Subjects

  • Institute for Man and the Environment
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning

Contributors

  • Strong, John D

Taylor, Brainerd, 1877-

Brainerd Taylor Family Papers, 1871-1964.

3 boxes (4 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 733

A member of a distinguished family of New England educators and clergymen, Brainerd Taylor played an key role in assisting the U.S. Army takes its first steps into modern mechanized warfare. Born in Newtonville, Massachusetts, in 1877, Taylor entered Harvard with the class of 1899, but during the rush of enthusiasm accompanying the start of the Spanish American War, he left before completing his degree to join the military. Serving with the Coast Artillery for several years, he became the Chief Motor Transport Officer for the Advance Section of the Service of Supply for the American Expeditionary Force during the First World War, earning promotion to Colonel, a Distinguished Service Medal, and the Legion of Honor from France for his efforts. Taylor married twice, first to Vesta Richardson, who died in 1919, and then to Helen Cady. Taylor died in 1955.

The Taylor family collection contains over 1,000 letters documenting the military career and personal life of Brainerd Taylor, with particularly thick coverage of the period of the First World War when he was stationed in France, building the Motor Transport Corps virtually from scratch. These letters are exceptionally well written and rich in description, both about his duties and his travels in France and Germany. The collection also includes Taylor’s extensive correspondence to his father, James Brainerd Taylor (1845-1929), and correspondence relating to Taylor’s wives, children, and grandchildren.

Subjects

  • France--Description and travel
  • Germany--Description and travel
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Taylor, Brainerd, 1877-
  • Taylor, Helen M.
  • Taylor, James Brainerd
  • Taylor, Vesta R.

Taylor, F. J. R. (Frank John Rupert), 1939-

Max Taylor Papers, 1951-2007.

2 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 658

Born in Cairo, Egypt, in 1939, F.J.R. “Max” Taylor became an internationally recogninzed specialist in phytoplankton. Educated primarily in his native South Africa, Taylor studied Zoology and Botany at the University of Cape Town, receiving his doctorate in 1965 for a dissertation on the phytoplankton communities in the southwestern Indian Ocean. Joining the faculty of the Departments of Earth and Ocean Sciences and Botany at the University British Columbia in 1964, he became full professor at the age of 35. At UBC, he continued to work on the phytoplankton of the Indian Ocean, preparing the seminal Indian Ocean Dinoflagellate Atlas (1976), which included some of the earliest electron micrographic illustrations of dinoflagellates. He was a pioneer in the study of the ecology of harmful algal blooms (red tides and brown tides), and he and Anand Prakash were the first to identify the causative dinoflagellate behind paralytic shellfish poisoning. His diverse research interests ran the gamut of ecological and evolutionary studies, from study of cryptomonad endosymbionts in Mesodinium to the feeding mechanism in Protoperidinium and the motility of the dinoflagellate transverse flagellum. An important figure in paleopalynology, he was also an early contributor to Serial Endosymbiosis Theory for chloroplasts and mitochondria. Named a fellow of the Royal Society of Canada in 1997 and recipient of the Yasumoto Lifetime Achievement Award by 9th Int Conf Harmful Algal Blooms (2000), Taylor was a cofounder of the International Society for Evolutionary Protistology (1975) and Founding President of International Society for the Study of Harmful Alagae (1998). He retired in 2005.

Consisting primarily of research notes, drafts of publications, and illustrations, the Taylor Papers offer primary documentation of the ecology and evolutionary biology of dinoflagellates.

Subjects

  • Algal blooms
  • Dinoflagellates--Evolution
  • Ecology
  • Phytoplankton

Types of material

  • Scanning electron micrographs

Transfer of archival records

Instructions for transferring departmental records to the University Archives

To transfer records to the archives and facilitate their retrieval as required, please keep the following in mind:

  • Verify that the records you wish to transfer are no longer needed for regular operations in your department. Remove and destroy any duplicate or redundant files as well as those not scheduled for retention.
    • In general, retain the last three years of records in-house before transfer to archives.
  • Rehouse the records to be transferred, retaining the current file order, into banker boxes which we provide.
  • Create an inventory of the records using the transfer form (excel) we provide and label the corresponding boxes using the box labels template (MS Word).
    • To assist in accurate identification and retrieval, please keep file names clear, concise, and memorable.
  • Note any restrictions on access to the files being transferred and if any records are scheduled for future destruction, please note carefully which records are to be destroyed and when.
  • Schedule a time for pick up: email or call (413-545-2780) the Archives, allowing 2-3 business days.
    • Upon receipt of the materials at the Archives, we will acknowledge receipt for your records and provide you with an accession number for future reference.
    • Make three copies of form: two for us to take away and one for you: your copy serves as a record of transfer and a guide for future access.

Is this your first time transferring records to the archives?

Email or call (413-545-2780) us for a consultation. We will survey your records, discuss best practices for caring for your files, and review the transfer process.

How can you retrieve items that have been sent to the archives?

Email or call (413-545-2780) us with the following information: accession number, Record Group (RG) number, Box number, and folder title. We will retrieve requested materials and deliver them, typically within 2-3 business days.

United Paperworkers International Union. Local 14

United Paperworkers International Strike Support Group Collection, 1988.

1 folder (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 322

By February 1988 members of of United Paperworkers International Union Local 14 of Jay, Maine, had been on strike for seven months. With the support of their state officials and officials of Massachusetts and Northampton AFL-CIO, a caravan of strikers traveled to Northampton to inform the public of their struggle. Collection is limited to a city of Northampton resolution and a brief report of the strikers position and their trip to the city.

Subjects

  • Paper industry workers--Labor unions--Maine
  • Strikes and lockouts--Paper industry--Maine

Contributors

  • United Paperworkers International Union. Local 14

United Steelworkers of America. Local 3654

United Steelworkers of America Local 3654 Records, ca. 1940-1979.

11 boxes (5.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 316

Local 3654 of the United Steel Workers of America was organized in Whitinsville, Massachusetts. Records include Minutes, by-laws, newsletters, grievances, company reports, and publications.

Subjects

  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • United Steelworkers of America. Local 3654

Verity, Peter G.

Peter G. Verity Papers, ca.1984-2009.

20 boxes (30 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 720

After receiving his doctorate from the University of Rhode Island for a study of the physiology and ecology of tintinids in 1984, Peter G. Verity joined the faculty at the Skidaway Institute of Oceanography. As a Professor of Biological Oceanography, Verity was interested broadly in the ecology of plankton and trophic interactions in the pelagic food web, studying the process of eutrophication and dissolved oxygen in the water column among other topics, and conducting a significant long-term analysis of nutrient variation in estuarine waters. Becoming deeply concerned about the future of oceanic environments and the accelerating decline of coastal ecosystems as a result of his research, Verity took on an increasingly active role in educating teachers about environmental issues. For his efforts, he was awarded the Nick Williams Award for Coastal Sustainability from the Center for a Sustainable Coast. Verity died unexpectedly at home on Dec. 31, 2009.

An important resource for marine ecology and scientific study of the environment, the Verity Papers contain an array of correspondence, research and grant proposals, manuscripts of papers, reprints, and notes of meetings.

Subjects

  • Estuaries
  • Marine ecology
  • Phytoplankton
  • Skidaway Institute of Oceanography--Faculty

Contributors

  • Verity, Peter G.

W.H. Grindol and Son

W.H. Grindol and Son, 1895-1900.

1 letterbook (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 705
Monument design
Monument design

A great-grandson of Revolutionary War general Henry Haller, William H. Grindol (1840-1927) settled with his family in Decatur, Illinois, in 1864, building a successful career in the retail marble trade. Beginning in partnership with Paul F. Jones, and later with his son, Grindol advertised his firm as dealers in “all kinds of foreign and American monuments,” selling marble and granite monuments, building stone, and iron reservoir vases. He was one of the founders of the Retail Marble and Granite Dealer’s Association of Illinois, serving as President of the Central District in 1897. Grindol died in Decatur in 1927 and is buried at Fairlawn Cemetery.

Grindol and Son’s letterpress copy book contains approximately 900 outgoing letters, 1895-1900, to marble and granite suppliers, in Vermont, Massachusetts, and other states. The majority of the correspondence consists of orders for gravemarkers, with many letters including measurements and other details, along with rough sketches of monuments, decorative motifs, and inscriptions.

Subjects

  • Marble industry and trade--Illinois
  • Sepulchral monuments--Illinois

Contributors

  • W.H. Grindol and Son

Types of material

  • Letterpress copies
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