Results for: “Carpenters--Labor unions” (200 collections)SCUA

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 6
  5. 7
  6. 8
  7. 9
  8. 10
  9. 11
  10. 12
  11. ...
  12. 20

Concordance for the Archives, V

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

V

Valley Grower
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Valley Grower (1956) RG-15/8
Valley Health Plan (HMO)
RG-30/15/13
Valley Review (1967-1968) (Student Publication)
RG-45/00/V3
Valley Women’s Studies Journal
see Five-College Women’s Conference, Valley Women’s Studies Journal RG-60/9
Valley Women’s Voice (1979-1993, 1995)
RG-7/2/00
Valuation of Courses (Official University Committee) (1911-1967)
RG-40/2/V3
Varsity Club (1921-1937)
RG-45/40/V3
Vegetable News and Notes
see Extension Service, Cooperative-Vegetable News and Notes (1964-1969) RG-15/8
Ventilation Working Group, Campus Building
see Campus Building Ventilation Working Group RG-30/15/4/1
Veterans Affairs, Office of (Veterans Assistance and Counseling Services)
RG-30/28
Veterans Assistance and Counseling Services
see Veterans Affairs, Office of (Veterans Assistance and Counseling Services) RG-30/28
Veterans Coalition (1967-1978)
RG-45/40/V4
Veterans Service Organization (VSO) (1983-1998)
RG-45/40/V4.5
Veterinary and Animal Sciences Department
RG-25/V2
Veterinary and Animal Sciences Department–Dairy Farm
RG-25/V2
Veterinary and Animal Sciences Department–Equine Center Council
RG-25/V2/3
Veterinary and Animal Science Department–Massachusetts Dairy Digest
see Massachusetts Dairy Digest (1936-1985) RG-15/8
VHP
see Valley Health Plan (HMO) RG-30/15/13
VIBES
see Volunteer Initiative Blending Education and Service (VIBES) (1989- ) RG-45/40/V6
Vice Chancellor/Dean for Enrollment Services, Assistant (1994- )
RG-30/1/5
Vice Chancellor, Executive
see Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost RG-6/1
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs
see Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost RG-6/3
Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, Associate (1988)
RG-6/3
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance
RG-35/1/1
Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services
RG-35/1
Vice Chancellor for Advancement
RG-39/1
Vice Chancellor for Advancement, Associate
RG-39/1/2
Vice Chancellor for Campus Activities, Assistant (1994- )
RG-30/1/4
Vice Chancellor for Computing and Information Systems, Associate (1975- )
RG-6/5
see also Telecommunications (Administrative Services) RG-35/17
Vice Chancellor for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies
RG-9/1
see also Dean (Graduate School) RG-10/1
Vice Chancellor for Research, Graduate Education and Economic Development
see Vice Chancellor for Research and Dean of Graduate Studies RG-9/1
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs
RG-30/1
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Associate
RG-30/1/1
Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs, Notes from the
see Notes from the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs (1973-1978) RG-30/00/1
Vice Chancellor for University Advancement
see Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
Vice Chancellor for University Advancement/University Relations, Associate (1993- )
RG-39/1/2
Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- )
RG-16/1
Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development
RG-39/1
Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development, Administrative Staff
RG-39/1/1
Vice President for Academic Affairs
RG-3/6
Vice President for Academic Affairs, Assistant
RG-3/6/1
Vice President for Labor Relations and Personnel, Assistant
RG-3/17/1
Vice President for Management and Business Affairs
RG-3/11
Vice President for Management
RG-3/17
Vice President for Management and Fiscal Affairs (1989)
RG-3/16
Vice President for Management and Fiscal Affairs and University Treasurer (1991- )
RG-3/13
Vice President for Planning
RG-3/7
Vice President for University Policy
RG-3/2
Vice President for University Relations
RG-3/14
Vice President Fort Devens
RG-55/1/1
Video
see Union Video Center RG-45/30/U5
Video Instructional Program
see Extended Engineering Education, Office of RG-14/5
Video Project, Student
RG-45/40/V5
Videotape Instructional Program
see Extended Engineering Education, Office of RG-14/5
Videotapes
see Films and Videotapes RG-186
Vietnam Moratorium, Faculty for (Non Official Committee) (1969)
RG-40/3/V5
Vietnam Veterans Against the War, Woman’s Caucus and
see Woman’s Caucus and Vietnam Veterans Against The War (1971-1972) RG-45/80/W5
Vietnamese Students Association (1994-1995)
RG-45/40/V5
VIP
see Extended Engineering Education, Office of–Video Instruction Program RG-14/5
Visitor’s Program, Distinguished
see Distinguished Visitors Program RG-45/50/D5
Visual Software, Audio
see Audio-Visual Software RG-185 thru 190
VIVA
see Volunteers Involved in Vital Action (VIVA) (1992- ) RG-45/40/V7
Voice, The (Graduate Student Publication) (1983-1993)
RG-45/20
Voice of New Women (Everywoman’s Center) (1973)
RG-7/2/00
Volleyball
see Sports, Women’s Volleyball (1967, 1986- ) RG-18/2
Volunteer Initiative Blending Education and Service (VIBES) (1989-1997)
RG-45/40/V6
Volunteers Involved in Vital Action (VIVA) (1992-1996)
RG-45/40/V7

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference Collection, 1986.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 140

A conference hosted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst on November 7-9, 1986, that examined the impact of the Constitution on politics and government, foreign policy, race relations, and the economy, and also discussed the impact on the constitution of popular struggles and the emergence of “rights consciousness.” Includes papers presented at the conference that were to be subsequently published in a special bicentennial issue of the Journal of American History.

Subjects

  • Constitutional history--United States--Congresses
  • Constitutional law--United States--Congresses
  • Journal of American history
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--History

Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991

Silvio O. Conte Papers, 1950-1991.

389 boxes (583.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 371

Massachusetts State Senator for the Berkshire District, 1950-1958, and representative for Massachusetts’s First District in the United States Congress for 17 terms, 1959-1991, where he made significant contributions in the areas of health and human services, the environment, education, energy, transportation, and small business.

Spanning four decades and eight presidents, the papers offer an extraordinary perspective on the major social, economic, and cultural changes experienced by the American people. Includes correspondence, speeches, press releases, bill files, his voting record, committee files, scrapbooks, travel files, audio-visual materials and over 5,000 photographs and slides.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Massachusetts. Senate
  • United States--Politics and government--20th century
  • United States. Congress. House

Contributors

  • Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Sound recordings

Cook Borden & Co.

Cook Borden and Co. Account Books, 1863-1914.

3 vols. (1.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 288 bd

Cook Borden (a great uncle of Lizzie Borden) and his sons were prosperous lumber dealers from Fall River, Massachusetts who supplied large mills and transportation companies in the region. Three volumes include lists of customers and building contractors, company and personal profits and losses, accounts for expenses, horses, harnesses, lumber, and the planing mill, as well as accounts indicating the cost of rent, labor (with the “teamers”), insurance, interest, and other items.

Subjects

  • Callahan, Daley & Co
  • Construction industry--Massachusetts--History
  • Contractors--Massachusetts--History
  • Crates
  • Lumber
  • Lumber trade--Massachusetts--Fall River--Accounting--History
  • Textile factories--Massachusetts--History
  • Textile industry--Massachusetts
  • Transportation--Massachusetts--History
  • Wages--Manufacturing industries--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Borden, Cook, 1810-
  • Borden, Jerome
  • Borden, Philip H
  • Borden, Theodore W
  • Cook Borden & Co

Types of material

  • Account books

Culver, Asa, 1793-

Asa Culver Account Book, 1820-1876.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 350 bd

Farmers who provided services (such as putting up fences, shingling, butchering, and cutting brush) for townspeople. Seventy page book of business transactions, and miscellaneous papers including mortgage payments, highway building surveyor assessments, and poems.

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Massachusetts--History
  • Blandford (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Farm management--Massachusetts--Blandford--Records and correspondence
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Blandford--Economic conditions
  • Wages--Domestics--Massachusetts--Blandford

Contributors

  • Culver, Asa, 1793-

Types of material

  • Account books

Cushing, Timothy

Timothy Cushing Account Book, 1764-1845 (Bulk: 1781-1806).

2 vols. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 485 bd

A carpenter by trade and a farmer, Timothy Cushing lived in Cohasset, Massachusetts, throughout most of his adult life. Born on Feb 2, 1738, the eighth child of Samuel Cushing, a selectman and Justice of the Peace from the second district in Hingham (now Cohasset), Cushing married Desire Jenkins (b. 1745) on June 4, 1765, and raised a considerable family of eleven children. During the Revolutionary War, he served for a brief period in companies raised in Cohasset, but otherwise remained at home, at work, until his death on December 26, 1806.

Cushing’s accounts offer a fine record of the activities of a workaday carpenter during the first decades of the early American republic, reflecting both his remarkable industry and the flexibility with which he approached earning a living. The work undertaken by Cushing centers on two areas of activity — carpentry and farm work — but within those areas, the range of activities is quite broad. As a carpenter, Cushing set glass in windows, hung shutters, made coffins, hog troughs, and window seats; he worked on horse carts and sleds, barn doors, pulled down houses and framed them, made “a Little chair” and a table, painted sashes, hewed timber, made shingles, and worked on a dam. As a farm worker, he was regularly called upon to butcher calves and bullocks, to garden, mow hay, plow, make cider, and perform many other tasks, including making goose quill pens. The crops he records reflect the near-coastal setting: primarily flax, carrots, turnips, corn, and potatoes, with references throughout to cattle and sheep. During some periods, Cushing records selling fresh fish, including haddock and eels.

Subjects

  • Agricultural laborers--Massachusetts--Cohasset--18th century
  • Carpenters--Massachusetts--Cohasset--18th century
  • Cohasset (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Cohasset (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century

Contributors

  • Cushing, Isaac, 1813-1891
  • Cushing, Timothy, 1738-1806

Types of material

  • Account books

Cushman, Artemas

Artemas Cushman Account Book, 1822-1846.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 073 bd

Born in Middleborough, Mass., in 1781, Artemas Cushman relocated to the central Vermont town of Braintree as a young man and spent decades as a carpenter and house joiner. He and his wife Phebe Spear raised a family of nine, one of whom (Artemas’ namesake) rose to local prominence as a officer in the state militia and representative in the state house and senate. Cushman died in Braintree in 1864.

Cushman’s small ledger is a fine record of the day-to-day work of an antebellum carpenter in rural Vermont. Part daybook and part account book, and often lacking in detail, Cushman’s entries document the work of a skilled artisan engaged in constructing or repairing houses, windmills, cider mills, bake houses, sheds, and barns, and at least one school. Occasionally, he applied his skills to smaller projects such as mending a wheel or making a wagon body or coffin, and less frequently he was compensated for manual labor (haying or planting). In a cash-poor economy, Cushman was typically repaid through an exchange of labor, or through commodities such as brandy, grain, or pork.

Subjects

  • Braintree (Vt.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Carpenters--Vermont--Braintree

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Delevingne, Lionel

Lionel Delevingne Photograph Collection, ca.1975-1995.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 047
Joan of Seabrook
Joan of Seabrook

Born and raised in France, the photojournalist Lionel Delevingne studied education at l’Ecole Normale in Paris, but settled permanently in the United States in 1975. Based at first in Northampton, Mass., he became a prolific photographer of American social movements while working for the Valley Advocate and other publications, covering the early years of the Clamshell Alliance and the antinuclear movement in considerable depth. His work has been exhibited frequently and published widely in the mainstream and alternative press, including the New York Times, Le Figaro Magazine, Die Zeit, Newsweek, Washington Post Magazine, Mother Jones, and Vanity Fair.

The Delevingne collection includes remarkable visual documentation of the antinuclear movement of the 1970s and beyond, including some of the its most iconic images. Beginning with coverage of the Seabrook occupation, Delevingne covered the movement as it spread throughout the northeastern U.S. and internationally. The collection includes exhibition prints, prints for publication, and digitized images ranging in date from the mid-1970s through 1990s. Copyright in the images has been retained by Delevingne.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--United States
  • Clamshell Alliance
  • Photojournalists
  • Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant (N.H.)

Contributors

  • Delevingne, Lionel

Types of material

  • Photographs

Duesing, Bill

Bill Duesing Collection, 1995-2000.

14 items (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 760
Bill and Suzanne Duesing
Bill and Suzanne Duesing

A pioneer in organic agriculture in New England, Bill Duesing has been as an environmental educator, writer, artist, and lecturer over for four decades. After graduating from Yale University (1964), Duesing worked as a Cooperative Extension agent before turning to organic principles in the early 1970s. Emphasizing sustainability and greater local food sufficiency, he has been instrumental in developing organic standards for gardening and land care and he has served as both founding president and later executive director of the Northeast Organic Farming Association Connecticut and president of the NOFA Interstate Council. During the 1990s, Duesing produced two radio shows, “Living on the Earth” (WSHU) and “The Politics of Food” (WPKN), and he is author of Living on the Earth: Eclectic Essays for a Sustainable and Joyful Future (1993).

The Duesing collection consists of transcripts of his radio show, “Living on the Earth” (1990-2000) and fourteen recordings of “The Politics of Food,” which was broadcast monthly over WPKN (89.5 FM) in Bridgeport in 1997-1998. Each half hour segment of “Politics” included news, a fifteen minute interview, recipes, and tips, with interviewees including Mel Bristol, Jac Smit, Vincent Kay, John Wargo, Hugh Joseph, Joseph Kiefer, Julie Rawson, Michael Sligh, Kathy Lawrence, Lee Warren, and Elizabeth Henderson.

Subjects

  • Cookery, Health aspects
  • Living on the Earth
  • Natural foods--Certification
  • Organic farming
  • Organic farming--Law and legislation
  • Politics of food
  • Sustainable agriculture

Contributors

  • Henderson, Elizabeth, 1943-
  • Rawson, Julie

Types of material

  • Audiotapes

Enfield (Mass.)

Enfield (Mass.) Collection, 1800-1939.

8 boxes (4 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 010
Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915
Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915

Situated at the confluence of the east and west branches of the Swift River in western Massachusetts, Enfield was the largest and southernmost of the four towns inundated in 1939 to create the Quabbin Reservoir. Incorporated as a town in 1816, Enfield was relatively prosperous in the nineteenth century on an economy based on agriculture and small-scale manufacturing, reaching a population of just over 1,000 by 1837. After thirty years of seeking a suitably large and reliable water supply for Boston, the state designated the Swift River Valley as the site for a new reservoir and with its population relocated, Enfield was officially disincorporated on April 28, 1938.

The records of the town of Enfield, Mass., document nearly the entire history of the largest of four towns inundated to create the Quabbin Reservoir. The core of the collection consists of records of town meetings and of the activities of the town Selectmen, 1804-1938, but there are substantial records for the Enfield Congregational Church. The School Committee, Overseers of the Poor, the town Library Association, and groups such as the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Bethel Masonic Lodge.

Subjects

  • Enfield (Mass.)--History
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Women--Societies and clubs

Contributors

  • Daughters of the American Revolution. Captain Joseph Hooker Chapter (Enfield, Mass.)
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town)
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). Overseers of the Poor
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). Prudential Committee
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). School Committee
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.)
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Auxiliary
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Missionary Society

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Church records
  • Photographs
  • Sermons
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 6
  5. 7
  6. 8
  7. 9
  8. 10
  9. 11
  10. 12
  11. ...
  12. 20
Special Collections and University Archives logo