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Griswold, Jonah B.

Jonah B. Griswold Ledgers

1841-1876
4 vols. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 638

An industrious artisan with a wide custom, Jonah B. Griswold made gravestones and sepulchral monuments in Sturbridge, Mass., during the three decades saddling the Civil War. Making 20 or more stones a month, Griswold had clients throughout southern Worcester County, including the Brookfields, Charlton, Wales, Woodstock, Warren, Brimfield, Union, Oxford, Worcester, Southbridge, Holland, New Boston, Spencer, Webster, Dudley, and Podunk, and as far south as Pomfret, Conn.

The four volumes that survive from Griswold’s operation include: record of cash expenditures for personal items, 1843-1876, combined with accounts of work performed for Griswold and daybook with records of marble purchased and stones carved, 1861-1876; daybook of cash on hand 1841-1842, with accounts of stone purchased and stones carved, April 1843-1849; daybook of stones carved, 1849-1860; and daybook of stones carved, 1855-1876. Griswold seldom records inscriptions, with most entries restricted to the name of the client and/or deceased, location, and cost, such as: “Oct. 14. Brookfield. Stone for Mr. Woods child 25.43” Prices during the antebellum period ranged from $10 (half that for infants) to over $140, with larger monuments going higher.

Subjects

  • Gravestones--Massachusetts
  • Stone carving--Massachusetts
  • Sturbridge (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Griswold, Jonah B

Types of material

  • Daybooks
Halley, Anne

Anne Halley Papers

1886-2004
12 boxes 8.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 628

Writer, editor, and educator, Anne Halley was born in Bremerhaven, Germany in 1928. A child during the Holocaust, she relocated with her family to Olean, New York during the late 1930s so that her father, who was Jewish, could resume his practice of medicine. Graduating from Wellesley and the University of Minnesota, Halley married a fellow writer and educator, Jules Chametzky, in 1958. Together they raised three sons in Amherst, Massachusetts where Chametzky was a professor of English at UMass and Halley taught and wrote. It was during the late 1960s through the 1970s that she produced the first two of her three published collections of poetry. The last was published in 2003 the year before she died from complications of multiple myeloma at the age of 75.

Drafts of published and unpublished short stories and poems comprise the bulk of this collection. Letters to and from Halley, in particular those that depict her education at Wellesley and her professional life during the 1960s-1980s, make up another significant portion of her papers. Publisher’s correspondence and a draft of Halley’s afterward document the Chametzkys effort to release a new edition of Mary Doyle Curran’s book, The Parish and the Hill, for which Halley and Chametzky oversaw the literary rights. Photographs of Halley’s childhood in Germany and New York as well as later photographs that illustrate the growth of her own family in Minnesota and Massachusetts offer a visual representation of her remarkable professional and pesonal life.

Subjects

  • Curran, Mary Doyle, 1917-1981
  • Jews--Germany--History--1933-1945
  • Poets, American--20th century
  • Women authors, American
  • Women poets, American
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Chametzky, Jules
  • Halley, Anne
Halpern, Joel Martin

Joel Martin Halpern Papers

1950-2007
ca.300 linear feet
Call no.: FS 001
Image of

The anthropologist Joel Martin Halpern (1929- ) has worked in regions from the Alaskan arctic to Laos and Lapland, but he is best known for his studies of modernization in the Balkans. Following undergraduate study in history at the University of Michigan (BA, 1950), Halpern entered the renowned anthropology program at Columbia, receiving his doctorate in 1956 for a study of the village of Orašac in the former Yugoslavia, which in turn became the basis of his first book, A Serbian Village (N.Y., 1958). After two years working in Laos as a Field Service Officer with the Community Development Division of the U.S. International Cooperation Administration, Halpern was a member of the faculty at UCLA, Brandeis, and the Russian Research Center at Harvard (1965-1967) before coming to UMass Amherst in 1967. A prolific author, Halpern has written or edited dozens of books on the Balkans and Southeast Asia, including A Serbian Village in Historical Context (1972), The Changing Village Community (1967), The Changing Peasantry of Eastern Europe (1976), and The Far East Comes Near (1989). Since retiring from the university in 1992, Halpern has remained in Amherst.

A massive collection documenting the long and varied career of a prolific ethnographer, the Halpern Papers include a wide range of textual and visual materials documenting the anthropological study of modernization, ethnicity, rural life and urbanization, the economy, and cultural change. Much of Halpern’s research centered on the Balkans (Macedonia and Serbia), Laos, and arctic Alaska and Canada, however he has worked on Asian immigrant communities in the United States and many other topics.

Subjects

  • Balkan Peninsula--Ethnic relations
  • Laos--Anthropology
  • Macedonia--Anthropology
  • Serbia--Anthropology
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Anthropology
  • Yugoslavia--Anthropology

Contributors

  • Halpern, Joel Martin

Types of material

  • Field notes
  • Photographs
Hamilton, Tom Sherman, 1924-

Tom Sherman Hamilton Papers

1965-1979
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 065

The horticulturist Tom S. Hamilton was a member of the faculty at UMass Amherst in the Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning. A specialist in ornamental plants, Hamilton worked at UMass from prior to 1950 until his retirement in 1986.

The Hamilton Papers contain three works on ornamental plants published by the Dept. of Landscape Architecture, along with a mimeographed laboratory manual that Hamilton used in his courses on landscape operations in 1979.

Subjects

  • Horticulture
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning

Contributors

  • Hamilton, Tom Sherman, 1923-
Hasen, Irwin, 1918-

Irwin Hasen: A Legacy Portfolio

2005
10 items 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 744
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A noted comic illustrator, Irwin Hasen enjoyed a career spanning over five decades, including work as staff artist for a number of classic comic book titles. He is perhaps best remembered as the artist behind Dondi, a strip about a war orphan co-authored with Don Edson, that ran nationally from 1955 to 1986.

Hasen’s Legacy Portfolio includes ten hand-pulled serigraphs signed and numbered by the artist, reflecting artwork from throughout his career. The SCUA portfolio is number 16 of 35 sets in the limited edition, with each print hand separated and printed in collaboration with the master printer Gary Lichtenstein.

Subjects

  • Cartoons and comics

Contributors

  • Hasen, Irwin, 1918-
  • Lichtenstein, Gary

Types of material

  • Cartoons (Humorous images)
  • Comic strips
  • Prints (Visual works)
  • Screen prints
Hayward, Fred M.

Fred M. Hayward Papers

1966-2015
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 186

A specialist in higher education and comparative politics in the developing world, Fred Hayward earned a doctorate in Politics at Princeton in 1968 for his research on political organizations in West Africa. Following a 24 year career at the University of Wisconsin (1967-1991), where he became Dean of International Studies and Programs, Hayward has worked as a Senior Associate to the American Council on Education, a consultant to the World Bank, and since 2009, as a Senior Higher Education Consultant with UMass Amherst. Having worked in fifteen countries with ministries, universities, and NGOs, his scholarship runs the gamut from African politics to higher education in Afghanistan.

The papers document some of Fred Hayward’s activities, centered in Africa and Afghanistan. The bulk of the collection stems from his workin Sierra Leone during the 1960s through 1980s, in Ethiopia (2003), and it includes noteworthy material on a World Bank-funded project to support strategic planning for six Afghan Universities as well as a feasability study on private section involvement in Afghan higher education.

Gift of Fred M. Hayward, Oct. 2017

Subjects

  • Afghanistan--Education, Higher
  • Ethiopia--Education, Higher
  • Sierra Leone--Education, Higher

Contributors

  • Center for International Education (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education
Healy, Mary Frances

Mary Frances Healy Photograph Album

1919
1 vol., 53 images 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: PH 069
Image of Etoile Club, 1919
Etoile Club, 1919

Mary Frances Healy, a young schoolteacher from Springfield, Mass., volunteered to serve with the National Catholic War Council in the waning days of the First World War. Stationed for sixth months at the Etoile Club in Paris in 1919, Healy helped provide meals, entertainment, and support for Catholic American serviceman awaiting demobilization. After returning home to Springfield, she resumed her teaching career at the Chestnut Street Junior High School.

This slender photograph album contains 53 photographs from Mary Healy’s time working with at the National Catholic War Council’s Etoile Club in Paris in 1919. Healy included a handful of images of the Club’s interior taken by a professional photographer, but also includes her own images depicting the staff and the area around the Club along with side trips to the scene of American military action at Belleau Wood and Chateau Thierry, the American military cemetery there and the devastation inflicted on the nearby town of Bouresches, and scenes in the streets of Paris, Rheims, and in the Haute Pyrenees.

Gift of John W. Bennett, Dec. 2015

Subjects

  • Belleau, Bois de (France)--Photographs
  • National Catholic War Council---Photographs
  • Nurses--Photographs
  • Paris (France)--Photographs
  • World War, 1914-1919--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photograph albums
  • Photographs
Heinrichs, Waldo H.

Waldo H. Heinrichs Papers

ca.1895-2015
5 boxes 7.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 633
Image of Waldo Huntley Heinrichs and Dorothy Peterson, 1919
Waldo Huntley Heinrichs and Dorothy Peterson, 1919

A diplomatic and military historian, Waldo H. Heinrichs was the product of a family with a unique global perspective. A descendant of missionaries to Hawaii and South India and son of a man who led the YMCA mission in Palestine, Heinrichs grew up traveling internationally. After military service during the Second World War, he received both a bachelor’s degree (1949) and doctorate (1960) in history from Harvard, sandwiching in post-baccalaureate study at Brasenose College, Oxford, and stint in the foreign service and advertising. A long-time member of the faculty at Temple University, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign relations in the twentieth century. His first book, Joseph Grew, American Ambassador (1966), was awarded the Allan Nevins Prize and in later works he explored both the diplomatic and military history of the Pacific.

A tireless researcher, Heinrichs left a rich record of correspondence, writing, and notes relating to his work as an historian, and especially to his work on the diplomatic and military background of the Pacific during the Second World War. His collection, however, is still broader, including content relating to his own military service during and after the war and fascinating materials relating to his family. Of particular note are records of his father, Waldo Huntley Heinrichs, including copies of a diary kept as a fighter pilot in the 95th Aero Squadron during the First World War and a memoir of his experiences being shot down and taken as a prisoner of war, along with later materials documenting his YMCA service, and his on faculty at Middlebury College and as an intelligence officer with the 8th Fighter Command during the Second World War.

Gift of Waldo Heinrichs, Mar. 2016

Subjects

  • Historians
  • Temple University--Faculty
  • United States. Army. Air Service. Aero Squadron, 95th
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • World War, 1939-1945--Diplomatic history
  • World War, 1939-1945--Pacific area

Contributors

  • Heinrichs, Jacob
  • Heinrichs, Waldo Huntley

Types of material

  • Photographs
Henry, Carl

Carl and Edith Entratter Henry Papers

ca.1935-2001
ca.20 boxes 30 linear feet
Call no.: MS 749
Image of Carl Henry
Carl Henry

Born into an affluent Reform Jewish family in Cincinnati in 1913, Carl Henry Levy studied philosophy under Alfred North Whitehead at Harvard during the height of the Great Depression. A brilliant student during his time at Harvard, a member of Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude in the class of 1934, Henry emerged as a radical voice against social inequality and the rise of fascism, and for a brief time, he was a member of the Communist Party. Two days before the attack in Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Henry met Edith Entratter, the daughter of Polish immigrants from the Lower East Side of New York, and barely three weeks later, married her. Shortly thereafter, however, he dropped his last name and enlisted in the military, earning a coveted spot in officer’s candidate school. Although he excelled in school, Henry was singled out for his radical politics and not allowed to graduate, assigned instead to the 89th Infantry Division, where he saw action during the Battle of the Bulge and liberation of the Ohrdruf concentration camp, and was awarded a Bronze Star. After the war, the Henrys started Lucky Strike Shoes in Maysville, Ky., an enormously successful manufacturer of women’s footwear, and both he and Edith worked as executives until their retirement in 1960. Thereafter, the Henrys enjoyed European travel and Carl took part in international monetary policy conferences and wrote under the name “Cass Sander.” He served as a Board member of AIPAC, the American Institute for Economic Research, the Foundation for the Study of Cycles, among other organizations. His last 17 years of life were enlivened by a deepening engagement with and study of traditional Judaism and he continued to express a passion for and to inform others about world affairs and politics through a weekly column he started to write at age 85 for the Algemeiner Journal. Edith Henry died in Sept. 1984, with Carl following in August 2001.

The centerpiece of the Henry collection is an extraordinary series of letters written during the Second World War while Carl was serving in Europe with the 89th Infantry. Long, observant, and exceptionally well written, the letters offer a unique perspective on the life of a soldier rejected for a commission due to his political beliefs, with a surprisingly detailed record of his experiences overseas.

Subjects

  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Henry, Edith Entratter

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs
Hertzbach, Stanley S.

Stanley S. Hertzbach Papers

1977-2002
1 box, 6 vols. 1 linear feet
Call no.: FS 140

A particle physicist educated at Johns Hopkins (PhD, 1965), Stanley S. Hertzbach joined the Physics faculty at UMass Amherst in 1965. Over the course of his career, he took part in high-energy experimental work at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the CERN hadron collider, the Cornell electron synchrotron, and beginning in 1979, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). With his colleague Richard Koffler, Hertzbach joined the SLD collaboration at SLAC in 1986 studying Z particles, and the BaBar (B Meson) group in 1994. A major contributor to the SLD “beamline group,” Hertzbach took part in the BaBar calorimeter beam test and in testing of its calorimeter modules. He was an active member of the SLD advisory group and chaired the SLAC Users Organization (SLUO) in the 1990s. Hertzbach’s contributions to UMass included service on several committees relating to student achievement, including a stint as Undergraduate Advising Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Hertzbach retired from UMass in 2009.

The Hertzbach collection consists of two distinct parts: six laboratory notebooks kept while conducting research at SLAC (1987-2002), and approximately 0.5 linear feet of records from university committees on which Hertzbach sat (e.g. the Space and Calendar, 1977-1983).

Subjects

  • B mesons
  • Nuclear physics
  • SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics

Types of material

  • Laboratory notes