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Hertzbach, Stanley S.

Stanley S. Hertzbach Papers

1 box, 6 vols. 1 linear feet
Call no.: FS 140

A particle physicist educated at Johns Hopkins (PhD, 1965), Stanley S. Hertzbach joined the Physics faculty at UMass Amherst in 1965. Over the course of his career, he took part in high-energy experimental work at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the CERN hadron collider, the Cornell electron synchrotron, and beginning in 1979, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). With his colleague Richard Koffler, Hertzbach joined the SLD collaboration at SLAC in 1986 studying Z particles, and the BaBar (B Meson) group in 1994. A major contributor to the SLD “beamline group,” Hertzbach took part in the BaBar calorimeter beam test and in testing of its calorimeter modules. He was an active member of the SLD advisory group and chaired the SLAC Users Organization (SLUO) in the 1990s. Hertzbach’s contributions to UMass included service on several committees relating to student achievement, including a stint as Undergraduate Advising Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Hertzbach retired from UMass in 2009.

The Hertzbach collection consists of two distinct parts: six laboratory notebooks kept while conducting research at SLAC (1987-2002), and approximately 0.5 linear feet of records from university committees on which Hertzbach sat (e.g. the Space and Calendar, 1977-1983).

  • B mesons
  • Nuclear physics
  • SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics
Types of material
  • Laboratory notes

Hicks, Adeline

Adeline Hicks Papers

3 boxes 1.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 070

Professor of Physical Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst when it was known as Massachusetts Agricultural College who established the physical education program for women and helped to create the women’s gymnasium and athletic field. In her retirement she composed music that was performed by the University of Arizona orchestra.

Includes musical scores, lesson-plan photographs illustrating instruction in modern dance, correspondence, printed programs for performance of the musical compositions, text of an address, a history of physical education for women at Massachusetts State College by Mrs. Hicks, personnel records, and brief biographical items.

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
  • Hicks, Adeline

Hicks, Curry S.

Curry S. Hicks Papers

1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: FS 069
Image of Curry S. Hicks
Curry S. Hicks

Curry S. Hicks pioneered the University’s athletics program as it transitioned from the Massachusetts Agricultural College to the University of Massachusetts. Hicks led the charge to build modern athletic fields and gymnasia and during his tenure, many of the University’s teams climbed to new heights of excellence. Born in 1885 in Enfield, New York, Hicks began undergraduate studies at Michigan State University but was forced to drop out because he was unable to pay tuition, beginning a teaching career that brought him from math teacher to high school principal. Returning to Michigan Normal School, Hicks earned his B.A. in physical education in 1909, followed by the Hitchcock Fellowship at Amherst College and eventually his assistant professorship in Physical Education and Hygiene at the University in 1911. On his retirement in 1949, Hicks left behind a thoroughly modernized athletics program and moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he passed away in 1963.

The Curry S. Hicks Papers consist of a bound volume of letters, sent to Hicks as a commemoration of his retirement in 1949 and a folder of correspondence related to his organization and fundraising efforts for a new physical education building at the University.

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
  • Hicks, Curry S

Hoag, Benjamin

Benjamin Hoag Records

1901-1915 Bulk: 1907-1914
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 710

Born at Ancram, N.Y., the merchant Benjamin Hoag (1865-1932) lived most of his life in Stephentown, N.Y., near the Massachusetts border. In 1900, he was listed as a dealer in bicycles, but by 1910, he was operating a broader retail trade in dry goods and grains. At the same time, he conducted a thriving trade in ornithological and oological supplies, announcing in journals such as The Oologist that he sold “books, periodicals, tools, supplies, eggs” as well as “fine line fish tackle and rods.” He also appears to have run a magazine subscription agency, offering everything from the Saturday Evening Post and Good Housekeeping to professional journals such as the Condor Magazine.

The Hoag collection consists of 1,345 letters, mostly incoming, and over 800 pieces receipts, ephemeral items, and other documents, relating to both Hoag’s oological and magazine businesses. Concentrated between 1901 and 1914, the collection offers a rich documentation of the oological trade in the years shortly before it was outlawed in 1918.

  • Birds--Eggs
  • Egg trade--New York (State)
  • Hoag, Benjamin

Hollister, Leonard D.

Leonard D. Hollister Collection

48 boxes, 94 items 56 linear feet
Call no.: MS 688
Image of Santa Clara figurative bowl (70.291)
Santa Clara figurative bowl (70.291)

Born in Denver, Colorado, in October 1884, Leonard D. Hollister was a collector of Southwestern Native American pottery and the son of Uriah S. Hollister, a prominent executive with the Continental Oil Company and author of The Navajo and His Blanket (1903), an early work on Navajo textiles.

The Hollister collection is a diverse assemblage of 94 works by Native American potters, representing a cross-section of southwestern cultures and pueblos. According to Fred A. Rosenstock, who purchased the collection after Hollister’s death, the pieces were acquired one or two at a time over several decades, often purchased directly from the artist. Hollister acquired examples from pueblos including Acoma, Cochiti, Hopi, Jemez, Laguna, Maricopa, Picuris, San Ildefonso, San Felipe, San Juan, Santa Clara, Santo Domingo, Taos, Tesusque, Zia, and Zuni. The signed pieces, over a quarter of the collection, includes works by some of the century’s most influential potters.

  • Indian pottery--North America
  • Pueblo Indians--Industries
Types of material
  • Pottery (Object genre)

Horrigan, Leonta G.

Leonta G. Horrigan Papers

37 boxes 55.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 114

A member of the Massachusetts State College Class of 1936, Leonta Gertrude Horrigan was affiliated with UMass Amherst throughout her long career in academia. After receiving he MA from Smith College in 1942 for a thesis on DeQuincy and Milton, Horrigan taught creative writing, composition, among writing classes, to UMass undergraduates, and was frequently singled out as a favorite instructor on campus. In 1964, she was appointed Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and retired to emeritus status in 1986.

The Horrigan Papers contain nearly a half century record of instruction in writing education at UMass, with a wide array of other materials relating to Horrigan’s varied interest, events on campus, and to the evolution of the university in the post-war years.

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
  • Horrigan, Leonta G

Hunerwadel, Helen B.

Helen B. and Otto K. Hunerwadel Collection

1889-1990 Bulk: 1949-1959
10 boxes 5.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 401
Image of Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949
Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949

In 1948, Otto and Helen Hunerwadel were among the first cohort of Fulbright grantees to work in the newly independent nation of Burma. Having worked as a county agent in Tennessee since the height of the Depression, Otto (1891-1952) brought a wealth of experience as an agricultural teacher and advisor, while Helen (1898-1996) was an experienced instructor in canning technologies. Based near Taunggyi in the eastern Shan states, the Hunerwadels were witness to the earliest days of conflict between the central government and both Communist and ethnic Karen insurgencies, but despite the instability, they left a record of assistance that contributed both to the formation of US policy in international development and the growth of the Fulbright program. In July 1952, Otto contracted malaria and died in Rangoon of thrombophlebitis produced by his treatment. He became famous posthumously as the model for the heroic title character in William Lederer’s novel, The Ugly American. Although Helen returned to the states after Otto’s death, she continued to work with Fulbright programs, doing two-year tours of Iran (1953-1955) and Surinam.

The collection includes dense documentation of the Hunerwadel’s work in Burma and Iran, and the early years of American foreign aid in south and southeast Asia. Consisting primarily of six thick scrapbooks, the collection provides a rich visual record, combined with letters and printed materials of time abroad. One scrapbook is devoted primarily to the Hunerwadel family, and the collection also includes a plaque commemorating Otto in Burma, and a copy of Helen Hunerwadel’s engaging unpublished memoir, “Our Burma story.”

  • Burma--Description and travel
  • Burma--Foreign relations--United States
  • Burma--History--1948-1962
  • Iran--Description and travel
  • United States--Foreign relations--Burma
  • Hunerwadel, Otto K.
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum

early 13th century
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 955
Image of First page of Interpretationes
First page of Interpretationes

Preparing to translate the Bible from Hebrew into Latin, St. Jerome relocated to Palestine, where in 388, he began, as he wrote, to “set forth a book of Hebrew Names, classing them under their initial letters, and placing the etymology of each at the side.” His Interpretationes nominum Hebraeorum (Interpretations of Hebrew Names) enjoyed wide popularity throughout the Middle Ages and was a regular part of early medieval Gospel books as an exegetical aid.

This incomplete copy of the Interpretation of Hebrew Names begins with “A[h]az apprehendens” and continues through “Tirus angustia v[e]l tribulatio s[i]v[e] plasmatio aut fortitudo.” Internal evidence suggests that it was once part of a larger manuscript, presumably a Bible.

Language(s): Latin
  • Bible--Dictionaries
  • Bible--Manuscripts, Latin
  • Jerome, Saint, -419or 420. Liber interpretatonis Hebraicorum nominum
  • Names in the Bible
Types of material
  • Illuminated manuscripts

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers. Locals 36, 161, 707, and 710

International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Records

11 boxes 5.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 107

The records of Northampton Local 36 of the IBEW provide insight into the adjustments of union members to the introduction of new technology, the changing labor environment, and the local debates over the merits of the use of nuclear power in the region. Collection includes by-laws, reports, correspondence, contracts, membership lists, and materials relating to nuclear energy.

  • Electricians--Labor unions
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

International Women’s Year Conference

International Women's Year Conference Collection

6 boxes 2.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 510
Image of

After 1975 was designated as the first International Women’s Year by the United Nations, later extended to a decade, President Carter created a National Commission on the Observance of International Women’s Year. A national women’s conference was proposed and funded by the U.S.Congress, the first and only time the federal government funded a nationwide women’s conference. A series of state meetings were held throughout 1977 to elect delegates to the national conference and to identify goals for improving the status of women over the next decade.

This collection consists of state reports prepared and submitted to the National Commission for the Observance of International Women’s Year. Reports include details about the election of national delegates, topics of workshops held at the meetings, and resolutions adopted by individual states.

  • Feminism--United States
  • International Women's Year Conference
  • Women's rights--United States