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You searched for: "“Tax-sales--Massachusetts--Colrain”" (page 8 of 92)

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Watchmaker (Springfield, Mass.)

Watchmaker's Account Book, 1882-1883
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 623 bd

The mid-century success of the Waltham Watch Company set the stage for a period of innovation and corporate ferment in the manufacture and distribution of watches in the United States. As watchmakers and technologies spread and new companies sprouted and split at a rapid pace, Springfield emerged as a center for the production of high quality, mass produced watches. Perhaps best known among the large local corporations, the Hampden Watch Company was established in 1877 from the New York Watch Company and was bought out in turn by the Dueber Watch Company and relocated a decade later.

The unidentified owner of this slender account book maintained itemized records of income and expenses for a relatively small watchmaking concern in Springfield between May 1882 and September 1883. Most of the trade consisted of sales of accoutrements and repair work.

Acquired from Dan Casavant, 1999
Subjects
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Watchmakers--Massachusetts--Springfield
Types of material
  • Account books

Wheeler, Truman

Truman Wheeler Account Book, 1764-1772
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 618 bd

One of twelve children of Obadiah and Agnes (Tuttle) Wheeler, Truman Wheeler was born in Southbury, Conn., on Nov. 26, 1741. After completing his education, reportedly at Yale, Wheeler moved north to Great Barrington, Mass., in the spring of 1764. Acquiring property about a mile south of the center of town, he soon established himself as a general merchant trading in silk, fabrics, and a variety of domestic goods.

The Wheeler account book represents the initial years of a thriving, late colonial mercantile business in far western Massachusetts. Beginning in June 1764, not long after Wheeler set up shop in Great Barrington, the account book includes meticulous records of sales of domestic goods ranging from cloth (linen, silks, and osnabrig) to buttons, ribbons, and pins, snuff boxes, a “small bible,” “jews harps,” and tobacco. Among the prominent names that appear as clients are members of the Burghardt and Sedgwick families.

Subjects
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
Contributors
  • Wheeler, Truman, 1741-1815
Types of material
  • Account books

Wright, John

John Wright Account Books, 1818-1859
9 vols. (3 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 162

Descendants of one of the founding families of Northampton, Mass., John Wright and his brother Samuel were farmers and freight haulers during the first half of the nineteenth century. Before the 1840s, the brothers hauled freight by wagon from Northampton as far away as Hartford and Boston, however the advent of lower-cost carriers over canal and rail, led them to restrict their operations to a local clientele.

The Wright collection includes nine bound volumes and four folders of loose material associated with the businesses of John Wright, his brother Samuel, and son Edwin. They document the growth of a freight hauling firm that supported a substantial trade stretching to Boston, as well as the eventual decline of that business.

Subjects
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Northampton
  • Freight and freightage--Massachusetts
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
Types of material
  • Account books

Associated Industries of Massachusetts

Associated Industries of Massachusetts Collection, 1944-1986
2 boxes (1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 155

Founded in 1915, the Associated Industries of Massachusetts (AIM) is the largest non-profit, nonpartisan association of employers in the state and a “voice for business.” As a lobbying organization, the AIM focuses on issues affecting employers of all size in the state with goal of supporting job growth and economic activity and advocates for fair and equitable public policy. The organization also provides services for management and human relations professionals to increase workforce productivity and to improve workforce recruitment and retention.

Approximately half of this small collection consists of AIM newsletters from the 1940s and 1950s, with the other half consisting of newsletters relating to lobbying efforts in the early- to mid-1980s.

Subjects
  • Employers' Associations--Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--20th century

Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike Company

Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike Company Records, 1799
1 vol. (0.15 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 088

Authorized in March 1799, the Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike Company constructed a toll road through miles of rough terrain and sparse settlements, connecting Leominster, Athol, Greenfield, and Northfield. Having opened areas to land travel that had previously been accessible only over rivers, the Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike ceased operations in 1833 after years of declining revenues.

The collection consists primarily of one volume of records of the directors of the Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike, including minutes of meetings, accounts of tolls collected, and drafts of letters.

Subjects
  • Toll roads--Massachusetts
Contributors
  • Fifth Massachusetts Turnpike Company

Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies

Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies Collection, 1699-1853
76 titles (20 linear feet)
Call no.: RB 029

Founded by Arthur Kinney in 1998, the Massachusetts Center for Interdisciplinary Renaissance Studies promotes the research, teaching, and dissemination of all aspects of literature and culture in the Early Modern Period (roughly 1400-1700). In addition to sponsoring a diverse array of visiting scholars, scholarly conferences, lectures, and seminars, the Center hosts dramatic performances, concerts, and special events for the general public.

As a partner of the Renaissance Center, SCUA is steward for antiquarian books that fall outside the Center’s primary chronological and thematic scope. Books printed during the Renaissance and selected scholarly works on the era are housed at the Center itself.

Transfer from the Renaissance Center, 2016-2017
Subjects
  • Printing--History

Massachusetts Commission on Collective Bargaining

Massachusetts Commission on Collective Bargaining Records, 1969-1973
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 023

In 1969, Governor Francis W. Sargeant established a bi-partisan council to review municipal and state collective bargaining practices more than decade after all public employees were extended the right to join unions. Over the next three years, the council heard from both sides, interviewing representatives from management and labor, and holding regional hearings throughout the state. The work of the group culminated in the enactment of the Massachusetts Public Employee Collective Bargaining Law (M.G.L. c.150E) in 1973, which granted full bargaining rights to most state and municipal employees.

The collection includes detailed minutes of meetings, transcripts of testimony, drafts of legislature, reports, and recommendations of the council.

Subjects
  • Collective bargaining
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
Contributors
  • Massachusetts Commission on Collective Bargaining

Massachusetts Federation of Business and Professional Women

Massachusetts Federation of Business and Professional Women Records, 1925-1992
25 boxes (36.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 394

First called for in 1918 as a result of the need for a coordinated women’s effort during World War I, the National Federation of Business and Professional Women’s Clubs was not officially formed until just after the armistice was signed in 1919. The new organization did not die with the end of the war, however, as first expected. Instead the group determined that the need for a national business women’s organization was of equal or greater importance during a time of peace. Today Massachusetts state affiliates continue to improve the lives of working women through action on issues such as economic empowerment, women’s health, family and medical leave, and pay equity.

The records of the Massachusetts Federation of Business and Professional Women consist chiefly of correspondence and minutes of meetings, which together chronicle the various issues the state club has worked on for more than sixty years. In addition to materials that document the efforts of the state affiliate there are also records for local chapters in Massachusetts (Hampshire County and Upper Cape Cod centered in Falmouth) which include annual reports and newsletters. Publications issued by the parent organization, BPW/USA, connect the national agenda with topics of importance to the state and local chapters.

Subjects
  • Businesswomen--Massachusetts
  • Women--Massachusetts
  • Women--Societies and clubs--History
Contributors
  • Business and Professional Women/USA
  • Massachusetts Federation of Business and Professional Women

Massachusetts Review

Massachusetts Review Records, 1959-2013
49 boxes (73 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 555

The Massachusetts Review is an independent quarterly of literature, the arts, and public affairs. Co-founded by Jules Chametzky and Sidney Kaplan in 1959 to promote eclectic, nontraditional, and underrepresented literary and intellectual talent, the Review has been an important venue for African American, Native American, and feminist writers and poets, mixing new and established authors.

The records of the Massachusetts Review document the history and operations of the magazine from its founding to the present, including general correspondence and nearly complete editorial files for published works. The collection also includes a small number of audio recordings of MR2, a radio show hosted by Review editor David Lenson with interviews of writers, artists, and cultural critics.

Subjects
  • Criticism--20th century--Periodicals
  • Literature--20th century--Periodicals
  • Poetry--20th century--Periodicals
Contributors
  • Abramson, Doris E
  • Chametzky, Jules
  • Massachusetts Review

Massachusetts Review

David Lenson, editor of the Massachusetts Review, hosts MR2, an hour-long radio show on radio station WMUA (FM 91.1) featuring interviews with local writers, artists, and cultural critics.

Digital copies of the interviews can be purchased through the Massachusetts Review.

 

  • Sut Jhally, Professor of Communication at UMass Amherst and Director of the Media Education Foundation.
      Broadcast: Jan. 9, 2003 (File size: 13.6 Mb)
  • Bill Streeter, owner of Silver Maple Bindery in Northampton
      Broadcast: Jan. 2, 2003 (13.4 Mb)
  • Hans Teensma, principle of the design firm InPress, Northampton, Mass.
      Broadcast: Jan. 9, 2003 (13.0 Mb)
  • Dara Wier, poet and Professor in the MFA program at UMass Amherst
      Broadcast: Jan. 2, 2003 (12.6 Mb)
  • Matthew Zapruder, Poet and publisher
      Broadcast: March 6, 2003 (14.1 Mb)
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