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Hasen, Irwin, 1918-

Irwin Hasen: A Legacy Portfolio
2005
10 items (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 744
Image of

A noted comic illustrator, Irwin Hasen enjoyed a career spanning over five decades, including work as staff artist for a number of classic comic book titles. He is perhaps best remembered as the artist behind Dondi, a strip about a war orphan co-authored with Don Edson, that ran nationally from 1955 to 1986.

Hasen’s Legacy Portfolio includes ten hand-pulled serigraphs signed and numbered by the artist, reflecting artwork from throughout his career. The SCUA portfolio is number 16 of 35 sets in the limited edition, with each print hand separated and printed in collaboration with the master printer Gary Lichtenstein.

Subjects
  • Cartoons and comics
Contributors
  • Hasen, Irwin, 1918-
  • Lichtenstein, Gary
Types of material
  • Cartoons (Humorous images)
  • Comic strips
  • Prints (Visual works)
  • Screen prints

Hayward, Fred M.

Fred M. Hayward Papers
1966-2015
3 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 186

A specialist in higher education and comparative politics in the developing world, Fred Hayward earned a doctorate in Politics at Princeton in 1968 for his research on political organizations in West Africa. Following a 24 year career at the University of Wisconsin (1967-1991), where he became Dean of International Studies and Programs, Hayward has worked as a Senior Associate to the American Council on Education, a consultant to the World Bank, and since 2009, as a Senior Higher Education Consultant with UMass Amherst. Having worked in fifteen countries with ministries, universities, and NGOs, his scholarship runs the gamut from African politics to higher education in Afghanistan.

The papers document some of Fred Hayward’s activities, centered in Africa and Afghanistan. The bulk of the collection stems from his workin Sierra Leone during the 1960s through 1980s, in Ethiopia (2003), and it includes noteworthy material on a World Bank-funded project to support strategic planning for six Afghan Universities as well as a feasability study on private section involvement in Afghan higher education.

Gift of Fred M. Hayward, Oct. 2017
Subjects
  • Afghanistan--Education, Higher
  • Ethiopia--Education, Higher
  • Sierra Leone--Education, Higher
Contributors
  • Center for International Education (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education

Henry, Carl

Carl and Edith Entratter Henry Papers
ca.1935-2001
ca.20 boxes (30 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 749
Image of Carl Henry
Carl Henry

Born into an affluent Reform Jewish family in Cincinnati in 1913, Carl Henry Levy studied philosophy under Alfred North Whitehead at Harvard during the height of the Great Depression. A brilliant student during his time at Harvard, a member of Phi Beta Kappa and magna cum laude in the class of 1934, Henry emerged as a radical voice against social inequality and the rise of fascism, and for a brief time, he was a member of the Communist Party. Two days before the attack in Pearl Harbor in December 1941, Henry met Edith Entratter, the daughter of Polish immigrants from the Lower East Side of New York, and barely three weeks later, married her. Shortly thereafter, however, he dropped his last name and enlisted in the military, earning a coveted spot in officer’s candidate school. Although he excelled in school, Henry was singled out for his radical politics and not allowed to graduate, assigned instead to the 89th Infantry Division, where he saw action during the Battle of the Bulge and liberation of the Ohrdruf concentration camp, and was awarded a Bronze Star. After the war, the Henrys started Lucky Strike Shoes in Maysville, Ky., an enormously successful manufacturer of women’s footwear, and both he and Edith worked as executives until their retirement in 1960. Thereafter, the Henrys enjoyed European travel and Carl took part in international monetary policy conferences and wrote under the name “Cass Sander.” He served as a Board member of AIPAC, the American Institute for Economic Research, the Foundation for the Study of Cycles, among other organizations. His last 17 years of life were enlivened by a deepening engagement with and study of traditional Judaism and he continued to express a passion for and to inform others about world affairs and politics through a weekly column he started to write at age 85 for the Algemeiner Journal. Edith Henry died in Sept. 1984, with Carl following in August 2001.

The centerpiece of the Henry collection is an extraordinary series of letters written during the Second World War while Carl was serving in Europe with the 89th Infantry. Long, observant, and exceptionally well written, the letters offer a unique perspective on the life of a soldier rejected for a commission due to his political beliefs, with a surprisingly detailed record of his experiences overseas.

Subjects
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Henry, Edith Entratter
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs

Heronemus, William E.

William E. Heronemus Papers
1972-1974
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 068
Image of Bill Heronemus in laboratory
Bill Heronemus in laboratory

William E. Heronemus underwent a radical transformation during his tenure as Professor of Civil Engineering at the University. After serving in the U.S. Navy, engineering the construction of submarines from 1941 until his retirement in 1965, Heronemus disavowed his work with nuclear energy and joining the University faculty in 1967, dedicated his life to the study of alternative energy. Born in Madison, Wisconsin, Heronemus earned his B.S. from then United States Naval Academy and two M.S.s (Naval Architecture and Marine Engineering), from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Heronemus was invited to the University to help develop a research program in Ocean Engineering and focused his work on alternative energy to sources that could make use of oceanic power. William Heronemus retired from the University in 1978 and died of cancer on November 2, 2002.

The William E. Heronemus Papers document his research in alternative energy and his quest for harnessing wind and thermal power from the ocean through technical reports on alternative energy systems written from 1972 to 1974.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Civil Engineering
Contributors
  • Heronemus, William

Hertzbach, Stanley S.

Stanley S. Hertzbach Papers
1977-2002
1 box, 6 vols. (1 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 140

A particle physicist educated at Johns Hopkins (PhD, 1965), Stanley S. Hertzbach joined the Physics faculty at UMass Amherst in 1965. Over the course of his career, he took part in high-energy experimental work at Brookhaven National Laboratory, the CERN hadron collider, the Cornell electron synchrotron, and beginning in 1979, at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (Stanford Linear Accelerator Center). With his colleague Richard Koffler, Hertzbach joined the SLD collaboration at SLAC in 1986 studying Z particles, and the BaBar (B Meson) group in 1994. A major contributor to the SLD “beamline group,” Hertzbach took part in the BaBar calorimeter beam test and in testing of its calorimeter modules. He was an active member of the SLD advisory group and chaired the SLAC Users Organization (SLUO) in the 1990s. Hertzbach’s contributions to UMass included service on several committees relating to student achievement, including a stint as Undergraduate Advising Dean of the College of Natural Sciences and Mathematics. Hertzbach retired from UMass in 2009.

The Hertzbach collection consists of two distinct parts: six laboratory notebooks kept while conducting research at SLAC (1987-2002), and approximately 0.5 linear feet of records from university committees on which Hertzbach sat (e.g. the Space and Calendar, 1977-1983).

Subjects
  • B mesons
  • Nuclear physics
  • SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physics
Types of material
  • Laboratory notes

Hicks, Adeline

Adeline Hicks Papers
1917-1987
3 boxes (1.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 070

Professor of Physical Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst when it was known as Massachusetts Agricultural College who established the physical education program for women and helped to create the women’s gymnasium and athletic field. In her retirement she composed music that was performed by the University of Arizona orchestra.

Includes musical scores, lesson-plan photographs illustrating instruction in modern dance, correspondence, printed programs for performance of the musical compositions, text of an address, a history of physical education for women at Massachusetts State College by Mrs. Hicks, personnel records, and brief biographical items.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
Contributors
  • Hicks, Adeline

Hicks, Curry S.

Curry S. Hicks Papers
1914-1949
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 069
Image of Curry S. Hicks
Curry S. Hicks

Curry S. Hicks pioneered the University’s athletics program as it transitioned from the Massachusetts Agricultural College to the University of Massachusetts. Hicks led the charge to build modern athletic fields and gymnasia and during his tenure, many of the University’s teams climbed to new heights of excellence. Born in 1885 in Enfield, New York, Hicks began undergraduate studies at Michigan State University but was forced to drop out because he was unable to pay tuition, beginning a teaching career that brought him from math teacher to high school principal. Returning to Michigan Normal School, Hicks earned his B.A. in physical education in 1909, followed by the Hitchcock Fellowship at Amherst College and eventually his assistant professorship in Physical Education and Hygiene at the University in 1911. On his retirement in 1949, Hicks left behind a thoroughly modernized athletics program and moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he passed away in 1963.

The Curry S. Hicks Papers consist of a bound volume of letters, sent to Hicks as a commemoration of his retirement in 1949 and a folder of correspondence related to his organization and fundraising efforts for a new physical education building at the University.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
Contributors
  • Hicks, Curry S

Horrigan, Leonta G.

Leonta G. Horrigan Papers
ca.1936-1986
37 boxes (55.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 114

A member of the Massachusetts State College Class of 1936, Leonta Gertrude Horrigan was affiliated with UMass Amherst throughout her long career in academia. After receiving he MA from Smith College in 1942 for a thesis on DeQuincy and Milton, Horrigan taught creative writing, composition, among writing classes, to UMass undergraduates, and was frequently singled out as a favorite instructor on campus. In 1964, she was appointed Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and retired to emeritus status in 1986.

The Horrigan Papers contain nearly a half century record of instruction in writing education at UMass, with a wide array of other materials relating to Horrigan’s varied interest, events on campus, and to the evolution of the university in the post-war years.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
  • Horrigan, Leonta G

Hunerwadel, Helen B.

Helen B. and Otto K. Hunerwadel Collection
1889-1990 (Bulk: 1949-1959)
10 boxes (5.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 401
Image of Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949
Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949

In 1948, Otto and Helen Hunerwadel were among the first cohort of Fulbright grantees to work in the newly independent nation of Burma. Having worked as a county agent in Tennessee since the height of the Depression, Otto (1891-1952) brought a wealth of experience as an agricultural teacher and advisor, while Helen (1898-1996) was an experienced instructor in canning technologies. Based near Taunggyi in the eastern Shan states, the Hunerwadels were witness to the earliest days of conflict between the central government and both Communist and ethnic Karen insurgencies, but despite the instability, they left a record of assistance that contributed both to the formation of US policy in international development and the growth of the Fulbright program. In July 1952, Otto contracted malaria and died in Rangoon of thrombophlebitis produced by his treatment. He became famous posthumously as the model for the heroic title character in William Lederer’s novel, The Ugly American. Although Helen returned to the states after Otto’s death, she continued to work with Fulbright programs, doing two-year tours of Iran (1953-1955) and Surinam.

The collection includes dense documentation of the Hunerwadel’s work in Burma and Iran, and the early years of American foreign aid in south and southeast Asia. Consisting primarily of six thick scrapbooks, the collection provides a rich visual record, combined with letters and printed materials of time abroad. One scrapbook is devoted primarily to the Hunerwadel family, and the collection also includes a plaque commemorating Otto in Burma, and a copy of Helen Hunerwadel’s engaging unpublished memoir, “Our Burma story.”

Subjects
  • Burma--Description and travel
  • Burma--Foreign relations--United States
  • Burma--History--1948-1962
  • Iran--Description and travel
  • United States--Foreign relations--Burma
Contributors
  • Hunerwadel, Otto K.
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Hyde, Dan

Dan Hyde Journal
1837
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 035

Little is known about Dan Hyde other than he appears to have been a resident of Ontario County, New York, during the period of the Second Great Awakening, probably in either the town of Farmington or Manchester.

This small paper-bound booklet includes some miscellaneous accounts along with three poems, “The Genesee song,” “Remember Lot’s wife,” and “Encouragement to pray.”

Subjects
  • Ontario County (N.Y.)--History
  • Religious poetry
Contributors
  • Hyde, Dan
Types of material
  • Poetry
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