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Monday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., during the academic year, except major holidays. During semester breaks, on certain holidays, and in the summer, SCUA is open 10:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. SCUA will be closed on days when the W.E.B. Du Bois Library is closed.

If you are planning a visit from a distance, please contact us in advance to verify that the department will be open. A small number of collections are stored off site and advance notice will expedite service.

Dates SCUA is closed:
Holiday 2017 2018
New Year’s Day Jan. 1 Jan. 1
Memorial Day May 29 May 28
Independence Day July 4 July 4
Labor Day Sept. 4 Sept. 3
Thanksgiving Day Nov. 23 Nov. 22
Christmas holiday Dec. 25, 28, 29; Jan. 1, 2018 Dec. 25; Jan. 1, 2019

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Mailing address

25th Floor
W.E.B. Du Bois Library
UMass Amherst

University Libraries
154 Hicks Way
UMass Amherst
Amherst, Mass. 01003-9275

Phone: 413-545-2780
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For directions to campus, see also the UMass Visitor’s Center Home Page. If you are driving, park in the Campus Center Parking Garage. When you emerge from the garage, the tall brick tower to the south is the W.E.B. Du Bois Library. Inside the Library, take the elevators to the 25th floor.

The most convenient accommodations are located in the Campus Center Hotel, however other options are listed on the Robsham Memorial Center website.

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Hubbard and Lyman

Hubbard and Lyman Daybook

1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 237 bd

Partners who manufactured harnesses, saddles, and trunks in Springfield, Massachusetts. Includes the prices paid for harnesses, whips, trunks, valises, and a variety of repair jobs such as splicing, coupling, and repairing of the hoses of the Springfield Fire Department. Also contains method and form of payment (principally cash, but also wood, leather, and leather thread in exchange) and twenty pages of clippings with the names of Lyman’s daughters, Mary and Frances, written on them.

  • Aaron P. Emerson Co. (Orland, Me.)
  • Barter--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Harness making and trade--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Harnesses--Prices--History
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Springfield (Mass.). Fire Dept
  • Trunks (Luggage)--Prices--History
  • Wages--Leatherworkers--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Whips--Prices--History
  • Hubbard and Lyman
  • Hubbard, Jason, b. 1815
  • Lyman, Moses, b. 1815
Types of material
  • Daybooks

Hunerwadel, Helen B.

Helen B. and Otto K. Hunerwadel Collection

1889-1990 Bulk: 1949-1959
10 boxes 5.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 401
Image of Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949
Otto (far left), Helen (center front), and Robert Clifford (far right), 1949

In 1948, Otto and Helen Hunerwadel were among the first cohort of Fulbright grantees to work in the newly independent nation of Burma. Having worked as a county agent in Tennessee since the height of the Depression, Otto (1891-1952) brought a wealth of experience as an agricultural teacher and advisor, while Helen (1898-1996) was an experienced instructor in canning technologies. Based near Taunggyi in the eastern Shan states, the Hunerwadels were witness to the earliest days of conflict between the central government and both Communist and ethnic Karen insurgencies, but despite the instability, they left a record of assistance that contributed both to the formation of US policy in international development and the growth of the Fulbright program. In July 1952, Otto contracted malaria and died in Rangoon of thrombophlebitis produced by his treatment. He became famous posthumously as the model for the heroic title character in William Lederer’s novel, The Ugly American. Although Helen returned to the states after Otto’s death, she continued to work with Fulbright programs, doing two-year tours of Iran (1953-1955) and Surinam.

The collection includes dense documentation of the Hunerwadel’s work in Burma and Iran, and the early years of American foreign aid in south and southeast Asia. Consisting primarily of six thick scrapbooks, the collection provides a rich visual record, combined with letters and printed materials of time abroad. One scrapbook is devoted primarily to the Hunerwadel family, and the collection also includes a plaque commemorating Otto in Burma, and a copy of Helen Hunerwadel’s engaging unpublished memoir, “Our Burma story.”

  • Burma--Description and travel
  • Burma--Foreign relations--United States
  • Burma--History--1948-1962
  • Iran--Description and travel
  • United States--Foreign relations--Burma
  • Hunerwadel, Otto K.
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum

early 13th century
1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 955
Image of First page of Interpretationes
First page of Interpretationes

Preparing to translate the Bible from Hebrew into Latin, St. Jerome relocated to Palestine, where in 388, he began, as he wrote, to “set forth a book of Hebrew Names, classing them under their initial letters, and placing the etymology of each at the side.” His Interpretationes nominum Hebraeorum (Interpretations of Hebrew Names) enjoyed wide popularity throughout the Middle Ages and was a regular part of early medieval Gospel books as an exegetical aid.

This incomplete copy of the Interpretation of Hebrew Names begins with “A[h]az apprehendens” and continues through “Tirus angustia v[e]l tribulatio s[i]v[e] plasmatio aut fortitudo.” Internal evidence suggests that it was once part of a larger manuscript, presumably a Bible.

Language(s): Latin
  • Bible--Dictionaries
  • Bible--Manuscripts, Latin
  • Jerome, Saint, -419or 420. Liber interpretatonis Hebraicorum nominum
  • Names in the Bible
Types of material
  • Illuminated manuscripts

Ireland Lyceum Constitution, By-Laws, and Regular Proceedings

Ireland Lyceum Constitution, By-Laws, and Regular Proceedings

1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 481 bd

Obscure in origin, the Ireland Lyceum appears to have been a fairly typical antebellum debating society, organized as an intellectually stimulating social activity for the benefit of its members. Meeting regularly, probably in the city of Holyoke, members formally debated a pre-assigned topic such as “Has America arrived at the zenith of her glory” (decided in the negative) or “are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness inalienable rights,” after which the members might hear an address.

A mangled, fragmentary echo of its former self, the Constitution, by-laws, and regular proceedings of the Ireland Lyceum contains the slender records of a typical antebellum men’s debating society. The volume was later used as a scrapbook with newspaper clippings covering the pages, however the clippings have been removed from the first several pages by a conservator, revealing some of the original content.

  • Debates and debating--Societies, etc.--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • Holyoke (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Lyceums--Massachusetts--Holyoke
Types of material
  • Scrapbooks

Jenks, Margaret R.

Margaret R. Jenks Collection

2 boxes 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 689

Margaret R. Jenks has been a family genealogist since 1964 and a cemetery transcriber since 1978. A prolific writer, she has published books listing all the cemetery inscriptions of the twenty-seven towns in Rutland County, Vermont, and of Granville, Washington County, New York, and she has conducted research on the stonecarvers of Rutland County. She served six years as a trustee of the Association for Gravestone Studies.

The Jenks collection is comprised of eighteen volumes containing exhaustive documentation of gravestone inscriptions from the following cemeteries in Vermont: Benson, Brandon, Castleton, Chittenden, Clarendon, Danby, Fair Haven, Granville (Washington County), Hubbardston, Ira, Mendon, Middleton, Mount Holly, Mt. Tabor, Pawlet, Pittsfield, Pittsford, Poultney, Proctor, Putney, Rutland, Sherburne, Shrewsbury, Sudbury, Tinmouth, Wallingford, Wells, West Haven, West Rutland.

  • Gravestones--Vermont
  • Jenks, Margaret R.

Jones, Ellen M.

Ellen Jones Diary

1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 370 bd

Ellen M. Jones was born in Lewis, N.Y., near the western shore of Lake Champlain, on Sept. 29, 1840. The daughter of a farmer originally from Vermont, Jones attended school in nearby Keeseville and witnessed a brother, Albert, go off to fight in the Civil War.

As a young woman living on her family’s farm in upstate New York, Ellen Jones kept a brief, rapidly written diary detailing local and family news as the nation edged into Civil War. In addition to concerns over her fragile health and the passing of local men and women, she includes a nicely detailed description of a Catholic wedding, 1858, a visit to John Brown’s grave in North Elba on July 4, 1860, and several brief allusions to her brothers and friends serving in the Union Army.

  • New York (N.Y.)--Social life and customs--19th century
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • Jones, Ellen M.
Types of material
  • Diaries

Junkins, Donald

Donald Junkins Papers

ca. 1920-2015
13 boxes ca. 16.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 074

A poet, expert on the works of Earnest Hemingway, Robert Francis, and D.H. Lawrence, and a 1953 graduate of the University, Donald Junkins directed the Master of Fine Arts in English program from 1966. Junkins juggled his career as a poet with his work at the University, focusing his teaching energy on literature, not creative writing, to save his creative resources. Before turning his energies to poetry, Junkins studied theology at Boston University School of Theology. While a student, Junkins met poet Robert Francis, took courses with Robert Lowell and, discovering his love of poetry through these contacts, Junkins life path was forever changed. After leaving Boston University, Junkins taught creative writing at Chico State University before coming to the University.

The Donald Junkins Papers document his youth in Saugus, experience as a student at the University, and his professional and creative life. The collection includes correspondence with his family throughout his life, photographs documenting his family in Eastern Mass., his records as head of the MFA in English program, and his personal and professional correspondence.

  • Hemingway, Ernest, 1899-1961
  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
  • Junkins, Donald, 1931-

Justice for Woody

Justice for Woody Records

3 boxes 1.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 444
Image of Rally against police brutality
Rally against police brutality

The organization Justice for Woody (JFW) was formed in December of 2001 in the weeks immediately following the death of Robert “Woody” Woodward, a political and environmental activist, social worker, teacher, and mountaineer. JFW seeks not only to honor Woody’s legacy, but also to advocate for a fair an independent investigation. The collection consists primarily of newspaper articles from various New England papers as well as Attorney General Sorrell’s Report and an independent analysis of it.

  • Brattleboro (Vt.). Police
  • Law enforcemnet--Vermont
  • Police brutality--Vermont
  • Police discretion
  • Woodward, Robert, d. 2001
  • Wrongful death--Vermont

Kahn, Paul S.

Paul S. Kahn Papers

10 boxes 17 linear feet
Call no.: MS 786
Image of Paul Kahn
Paul Kahn

An artist, writer, and activist for the disabled, Paul S. Kahn was born on Nov. 6, 1945, into a second-generation family of Jewish immigrants in Auburndale, Mass. Early in life, Kahn rebelled against the perceived “powerlessness” of the neuromuscular disorder with which he was born, pursuing an artistic, academic, and activist life. While studying drawing, painting, and sculpture at Boston University and earning a MA in counseling at Northeastern (1982), Kahn became an activist in the independent living movement and a pioneer in advocating for personal care assistance. Living independently from 1979, he worked as staff therapist at the Beth Israel-Deaconess Medical Center, as leader of a support group for the Muscular Dystrophy Association, and as a member of the Massachusetts Governor’s Advisory Commission on Disability Policy. In 1980, Kahn met Ruth Stern, who would become his frequent collaborator and wife of 21 years. As Kahn’s physical condition weakened after 1987 and he became dependent upon a ventilator, his creative focus shifted increasingly from art to writing and editing. The last two decades of his life were remarkably productive, resulting in over twenty plays and dozens of published essays and poems, and he was the long-time editor of the newsletter Disability Issues. Kahn died on Jan. 1, 2010.

Paul Kahn’s papers are a reflection of the intensely creative life of a committed activist. The collection centers on Kahn’s literary work, including manuscripts of his plays, essays, and poetry, but it includes numerous examples of his artwork and a number of home movies and tape recordings from his childhood.

Gift of Ruth Kahn, July 2013
  • People with disabilities and the arts
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
Types of material
  • Paintings (Visual works)