Results for: “Hampshire United Fund (Hampshire County, Mass.)--Archives” (716 collections)SCUA

Whittemore, Amos, 1759-1828

Amos Whittemore Daybook, 1817-1819.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 153 bd

Wagonwright and celebrated inventor of a machine that made cotton and wool cards from West Cambridge (now Arlington), Massachusetts. Includes records of services provided, such as repairing, cleaning, painting and varnishing chaises; providing wheels, springs, waterhooks, whippletrees, bellybands, and carpet; and mending reins and harnesses. Also contains lists of customers (including many prominent families from the town) and records of cash transactions.

Subjects

  • Arlington (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Arlington (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Carriage and wagon making--Massachusetts--Arlington--History--19th century
  • Carriage manufacturers and dealers--Massachusetts --Arlington--History--19th century
  • Harness making and trade--Massachusetts--Arlington--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Whittemore, Amos, 1759-1828

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Williams, Gray

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Gray Williams Photograph Collection, ca.1988-2000.

3 boxes (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 027

The editor, writer, and photographer Gray Williams was born in New York City in 1932, and spent most of his life in Chappaqua (Westchester County), N.Y. A 1954 graduate of Yale, Williams worked in the publishing industry for many years, including for the Metropolitan Museum of Art and the Museum of Modern Art, and since 1988, he has been a freelance writer, editor, and photographer. Long dedicated to history and historical preservation, he has served as New Castle Town Historian, chair of the New Castle Landmarks Advisory Committee, trustee of the Westchester County Historical Society, and as a member of the Property Council at the National Trust property Lyndhurst. He is the author of Picturing Our Past: National Register Sites in Westchester County (Westchester County Historical Society, 2003). A specialist in the early stone carvers of New York and Connecticut, as well as the use of grave monuments to illuminate and enrich the study of American history, art, and culture, Williams is a former trustee of the Association for Gravestone Studies and has contributed articles to its annual journal, Markers, and its Quarterly. In 2007, he was awarded the Association’s Harriette Merrifield Forbes Award for contributions to scholarship and preservation in the field.

The photographs and research materials he has contributed to the Association for Gravestone Studies are largely devoted to the subjects of three articles in the AAGS journal, Markers: “‘Md. by Thomas Gold’: The Gravestones of a New Haven Carver,” in collaboration with Meredith M. Williams, Markers V (1988); “Solomon Brewer: A Connecticut Valley Yankee in Westchester County,” Markers XI (1994); “By Their Characters You Shall Know Them: Using Styles of Lettering to Identify Gravestone Carvers,” Markers XVII (2000). The collection also includes photographs taken during AGS conferences, principally in New England, as well as a small group taken in Natchez Cemetery in Mississippi.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--New York
  • Stone carving--New York

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Williams, Gray

Types of material

  • Photographs

Williams, William Carlos, 1883-1963

William Carlos Williams Letters, 1946-1986.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 367

An obstetrician from Rutherford, N.J., William Carlos Williams (1883-1963) was a key figure in modernist poetry in the United States. Innovative and experimental in his poetry, Williams was a member of the avant garde poetically and politically, writing in a simple though never simplistic style that was unencumbered by the formalism and literary allusion of peers such as T.S. Eliot and Ezra Pound.

This collection consists of a small group of eleven letters and postcards written by Williams during the years 1946-1962, the majority of which were sent to Marie Leone, a nurse at the Passaic General Hospital in Passaic, New Jersey. In these letters Williams thanks Marie and her coworkers for the cards, good wishes, and gifts they sent to cheer him up. The letters are friendly and humorous even though they are for the most part written from Williams’s hospital bed during one of the frequent illnesses he suffered from in the later years of his life.

Contributors

  • Williams, Florence H. (Florence Herman), d. 1976
  • Williams, William Carlos, 1883-1963

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs
  • Postcards

Woodbury Boarding House

Woodbury House Boarding Register, 1804-1920.

1 vol. (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 172 bd

Boarding house on Folly Cove in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and boarding house at Echo Hill Cottage, perhaps also in Gloucester. Includes names of visitors, callers, boarders, and lodgers (some family friends and neighbors, others unknown guests) who hailed primarily from Massachusetts but also from states around the country. Also contains early accounts from 1804, guests at a Christmas party, lists of members of the Lanesville Universalist Church and Society who died or moved away, moral and religious verses entered by “Grand Ma”, and numerous preserved dried flowers and foliage, among other notations.

Subjects

  • Boardinghouses--Massachusetts--Gloucester
  • Gloucester (Mass.)--History

Types of material

  • Guest registers

Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring

Workmen's Circle Bulletins Collection, 1926-1928.

1 envelope (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 164 bd

Created by immigrants as a mutual aid society, the Workmen’s Circle has been around for more than 100 years, and has grown into a national organization with branches throughout the United States. Early issues addressed by the group include building tuberculosis sanitoriums, providing a healthcare and insurance benefit network for members, and creating Labor Lyceums that offered adult education to immigrants and workers.

The collection consists of 10 issues of the group’s publication, the Workmen’s Circle Bulletin, produced in New York City from 1926-1928 and published in Yiddish.

Subjects

  • Jews--Social conditions--United States
  • Mutual aid societies
  • Working class--New York

Zube, Ervin H.

Ervin H. Zube Papers, 1959-1997.

19 boxes (28.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 017
Ervin H. Zube
Ervin H. Zube

Ervin H. Zube was the head of the University’s Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning department (LARP) from 1965-1977. His groundbreaking research on landscape architecture and assessment helped define the international importance and influence of the field and his consultancy work, most notably with the National Park Service, brought his intellectual achievements into practical application. Born on April 24, 1931 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, Zube earned his B.S. at the University of Wisconsin in 1954. After a two year service in the United States Air Force, Zube enrolled in Harvard’s Graduate School of Design where he received his M.L.A in 1959. Zube held teaching positions at the University of Wisconsin and the University of California, Berkeley before beginning his ten year professorship at the University of Massachusetts in 1965. As the head of LARP, Zube established the Environmental Design program, which introduced a revolutionary cross-discipline approach to the study of landscape architecture. Zube became the director of the Institute for Man and the Environment in 1972 and restructured the institute to support academic research in new, important topics including community development and cooperation with the National Park Service, seeding important national and international institutions with progressively educated researchers. As a consultant, Zube helped the National Park Service develop their “master plan” for Yosemite and worked with numerous national and international institutions to manage and assess their environmental resources. Zube ended his career as a professor at the University of Arizona where he retired in 1983. He remained active in the field until his death in 2001.

The Ervin H. Zube papers include Zube’s lecture notes and academic correspondence, research materials and publications representing his work in landscape assessment and architecture, notes and reports from his consultancy work with many institutions and committees, correspondence from his role as a conference planner, as well as correspondence relating to his many book reviews. Zube’s papers also cover his research and teaching while at the University of Arizona and contain photographs from his research on the Connecticut River Valley.

Subjects

  • Institute for Man and the Environment
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Landscape Architecture and Regional Planning

Contributors

  • Zube, Ervin H.
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