Results for: “Women--Massachusetts” (827 collections)SCUA

Boarding House (Swift River Valley, Mass.?)

Boarding House Register, 1850.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 098

Twenty-four page register kept by unnamed person, possibly from a Quabbin town, listing boarders by name, payment received, and employee accounts. Payments noted in detail from February to October, 1850. Boarders included several doctors and L.S. Hills, possibly Leonard S. Hills of the Amherst, Massachusetts hat factory. Employee accounts list many women with Irish surnames, including Ellen O’Leary, Ellen Callahan, and Margaret Murphy.

Subjects

  • Boardinghouses--Massachusetts--19th century
  • Irish American women--History--19th century

Types of material

  • Account books

Boston AIDS Consortium

Boston AIDS Consortium Records, 1987-2005.

(10 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 458

In the fall 1987, a working group was formed in Boston to help coordinate planning for HIV-related services, prevention, and education. The Boston AIDS Consortium began operations the following January with the goal of ensuring effective services for people affected by HIV/AIDS and enabling them to live healthy and productive lives. In its eighteen year existence, the Consortium worked with over seventy public and private agencies and two hundred individuals.

The Records of the Boston AIDS Consortium provide valuable insight into community-based mobilization in response to the AIDS epidemic.

Subjects

  • AIDS (Disease)
  • AIDS activists--Massachusetts
  • Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome--Prevention and control

Contributors

  • Boston AIDS Consortium

Bucklin, Thomas, 1771-1843

Thomas Bucklin Daybook, 1841-1843.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 260 bd

Daybook of physician Thomas Bucklin who, for twenty-three years, practiced medicine in and around Hopkinton, Massachusetts. Accounts are listed chronologically and by surname; patients included women and local Irish laborers. Entries are brief and in medical shorthand. The book contains prescriptions, some for specific patients and some borrowed from other doctors; a list of deaths in Hopkinton for 1841-43, with the age of the deceased and cause of death; and personal notations in the margins of the book, noting holidays, weather conditions and trips.

Subjects

  • Bowker family
  • Bullard family
  • Claflin family
  • Hopkinton (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • McFarland family
  • Medicine--Practice--Massachusetts--Hopkinton
  • Mortality--Massachusetts--Hopkinton
  • Phipps family
  • Physicians--Massachusetts--Hopkinton
  • Rockwood family
  • Vaccination of children--Massachusetts--Hopkinton

Contributors

  • Bucklin, Thomas, 1771-1843

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Kenyon Leech Butterfield Papers, 1889-1945.

(12 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 3/1 B88
Kenyon L. Butterfield
Kenyon L. Butterfield

An agricultural and educational reformer born in 1868, Kenyon Butterfield was the ninth president of Massachusetts Agricultural College and one of the university’s most important figures. An 1891 graduate of Michigan Agricultural College and recipient of MA in Economics and Rural Sociology from the University of Michigan (1902), Butterfield entered university administration early in his career, becoming President of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1903 and, only three years later, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Possessed of a Progressive spirit, Butterfield revolutionized the college during his 18 years in Amherst, expanding and diversifying the curriculum, quadrupling the institutional budget, fostering a dramatic increase in the presence of women on campus and expanding the curriculum, and above all, helping to promote the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and developing the Cooperative Extension Service into a vital asset to the Commonwealth. Nationally, he maintained a leadership role in the field of rural sociology and among Land Grant University presidents. After leaving Amherst in 1924, Butterfield served as President at Michigan Agricultural College for four years and was active in missionary endeavors in Asia before retiring. He died at his home in Amherst on Nov. 25, 1936.

The Butterfield Papers contain biographical materials, administrative and official papers of both of his presidencies, typescripts of his talks, and copies of his published writings. Includes correspondence and memoranda (with students, officials, legislators, officers of organizations, and private individuals), reports, outlines, minutes, surveys, and internal memoranda.

Subjects

  • Agricultural education--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural education--Michigan--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--United States--History--Sources
  • Agriculture--United States--History--Sources
  • Education--United States--History--Sources
  • Food supply--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Higher education and state--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Michigan Agricultural College--History
  • Michigan Agricultural College. President
  • Rural churches--United States--History--Sources
  • Rural development--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Women--Education (Higher)--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Calkins, David

David and Marshall Calkins Account Books, 1848-1855.

3 vols. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 178

These three accounting volumes of Monson, Massachusetts physicians David and Marshall Calkins encompass the period May 1848–December 1855. Medically, these volumes reflect a growing understanding of the human body and the analysis and treatment of its ailments. Additionally, these account books reflect a period of growing prosperity for Monson through the birth of stream powered milling industries.

Subjects

  • Monson (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Physicians--Massachusetts--Monson

Contributors

  • Calkins, David
  • Calkins, Marshall

Types of material

  • Account books

Carroll, Lucius W.

Lucius W. Carroll Ledger, 1841-1862.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 245 bd

Businessman in several partnerships in south-central Worcestor county who owned a general store in Webster, Massachusetts. Includes lists of partners (such as John P. Stockwell of Stockwell and Carroll), yearly salaries and profits, accounts of what he sold and how he was paid, lists of individual customers and manufacturing companies, and labor accounts of workers. Also contains an alphabetical index to the ledger and several pages of notes receivable and notes payable.

Subjects

  • Barter--Massachusetts--History--19th century
  • Dudley (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Dudley Woolen Manufacturing Company (Dudley, Mass.)
  • General stores--Massachusetts
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Shopping--Massachusetts--History--19th century
  • Slater, George
  • Stockwell & Carroll
  • Union Mills (Webster, Mass.)
  • Uxbridge (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Webster (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Webster Woolen Mills (Webster, Mass.)

Contributors

  • Carroll & Crosby
  • Carroll, Lucius W

Types of material

  • Account books

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.

23 boxes (34.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768
Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center

Types of material

  • Videotapes

Champion Family

Champion and Stebbins Family Account Books, 1753-1865.

8 vols. (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 228

Account books from the Champion and Stebbins families of Saybrook, Connecticut and West Springfield, Massachusetts, who were involved in various businesses and professional activities. Includes lists of accounts by surname, services rendered, methods of payment, entries for treatments and remedies, lists of patients, and lists of banking activities. Volumes were kept by Reuben Champion (1720-1777), Jere Stebbins (1757-1817), and Reuben Champion, M.D. (1784-1865).

Subjects

  • African Americans--Massachusetts--West Springfield--History
  • Agriculture--Economic aspects--Massachusetts--History
  • Atwood, Elijah
  • Barter--Massachusetts--West Springfield
  • Champion family
  • Connecticut River Valley--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--History
  • General stores--Massachusetts
  • Homeopathic physicians--Massachusetts
  • Homeopathy--Materia medica and therapeutics
  • Medicine--Practice--Massachusetts--History
  • Physicians--Massachusetts
  • Pottery industry--Massachusetts--History
  • Saybrook (Conn.)--History
  • Shipping--New England--History
  • Stebbins family
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--History
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Women--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Champion, Reuben, 1727-1777
  • Champion, Reuben, 1784-1865
  • Stebbins, Jere, 1757-1817

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Colman, William, 1768-1820

William Colman Account Book, 1802-1822.

1 vol. (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 212 bd

Merchant and shoemaker from the Byfield Parish of Newbury, Massachusetts and Boscawen, New Hampshire. Includes accounts of the prices paid for shoemaking and agricultural labor, accounts of the men and women who worked for his father’s shoe store and factory, notes of who lived in the younger Colman’s home, a page mentioning his move to New Hampshire, and accounts of agricultural produce sales and exchange of farm labor.

Subjects

  • Agricultural wages--New Hampshire--History--19th century
  • Boscawen (N.H.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Boscawen (N.H.)--Rural conditions--19th century
  • Households--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Newbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Shoemakers--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Shoes--Prices--Massachusetts--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Colman, William, 1768-1820

Types of material

  • Account books

Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991

Silvio O. Conte Papers, 1950-1991.

389 boxes (583.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 371

Massachusetts State Senator for the Berkshire District, 1950-1958, and representative for Massachusetts’s First District in the United States Congress for 17 terms, 1959-1991, where he made significant contributions in the areas of health and human services, the environment, education, energy, transportation, and small business.

Spanning four decades and eight presidents, the papers offer an extraordinary perspective on the major social, economic, and cultural changes experienced by the American people. Includes correspondence, speeches, press releases, bill files, his voting record, committee files, scrapbooks, travel files, audio-visual materials and over 5,000 photographs and slides.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Massachusetts. Senate
  • United States--Politics and government--20th century
  • United States. Congress. House

Contributors

  • Conte, Silvio O. (Silvio Oltavio), 1921-1991

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Sound recordings
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