Results for: “University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Political Science” (1035 collections)SCUA

Western Massachusetts Library Club

Western Massachusetts Library Club Records, 1898-2006.

7 boxes (3.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 492
Deerfield Public Library
Deerfield Public Library

Situated in a region known for its progressive spirit, the Western Massachusetts Library Club was established in 1898 to respond to the unique needs of librarians overseeing small or rural libraries, and to foster camaraderie among local colleagues. Almost immediately, however, the club expanded its focus, taking positions on issues ranging from modern library practices to national legislation and leading the way in the expansion of services for public libraries, all while maintaining its identity as an advocate for local libraries and librarians.

The collection is richest in records that document the early history of the club including detailed meeting minutes, news clippings, programs, and circulars. Beginning in the late 1960s, the club’s activities are captured primarily through membership lists and meeting notices and programs. Taken together, the records trace the growth of the WMLC for more than a century from its establishment to the present.


  • Cutter, Charles A. (Charles Ammi), 1937-1903
  • Libraries--Massachusetts--History


  • Western Massachusetts Library Club

Barnard, Ellsworth, 1907-

Ellsworth Barnard Papers, 1924-2004.

(12.25 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 002
Ellsworth Barnard
Ellsworth Barnard

Ellsworth “Dutchy” Barnard attended Massachusetts Agricultural College, and received his Bachelor of Science degree in 1928. Barnard began teaching college English in 1930 at Massachusetts State College. In the fall of 1957 he took a position at Northern Michigan University (NMU). As chairman of the English department, Barnard presided over a selection committee which brought the first African-American faculty member to NMU. During the 1967-1968 academic year, he led the faculty and student body in protesting the dismissal of Bob McClellan, a history professor. Although the effort to reappoint McClellan was successful, Barnard had already tendered his resignation at NMU and returned to the University of Massachusetts at Amherst for the 1968-1969 academic year. He ended his career at UMass as the Ombudsperson, the first to fill that office. Barnard retired in 1973 and lived in Amherst until his death in December 2003.

Barnard’s papers document his distinguished career as an English professor and author, as well as his social activism, particularly on behalf of the environment. They consist of course materials, personal and professional correspondence, drafts of essays, lectures and chapters, published works, a collection of political mailings, a number of artifacts both from the University of Massachusetts and other educational institutions and organizations, and a number of poems by Barnard and others.


  • English--Study and teaching
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English


  • Barnard, Ellsworth, 1907-2003

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.


  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence


  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Collection policy

Frank Waugh's doves
Garden (white fan tailed doves in bird bath) by Frank Waugh, ca.1920

“… there must come vast social change in the United States; a change not violent, but by the will of the people certain and inexorable; carried out ‘with malice toward none but charity for all'; with meticulous justice to the rich and complete sympathy for the poor, the sick and the ignorant; with freedom and democracy for America, and on earth Peace, Good Will toward men.”

W.E.B. Du Bois, Chicago, June 29, 1951

In pursuit of our mission, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects materials of enduring historical and cultural value relating to four major thematic areas: the history and experience of social change in America; the histories and cultures of New England with an emphasis on Massachusetts; innovation and entrepreneurship; and the broad community associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Our collections are highly integrated and span all formats, including personal papers and organizational records, books and periodicals, maps, photographs, audio and video recordings, and digital materials of all kinds.

While not comprehensive, the following includes a brief synopsis of some of the primary focal points for SCUA’s collections:

Our approach to collecting

Echoing the philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois, SCUA collects original materials that document the histories and experiences of social change in America and the organizational, intellectual, and individual ties that unite disparate struggles for social justice, human dignity, and equality. Our decision to adopt social change as a collecting focus emerged from considering one of Du Bois’s great insights: that the most fundamental issues in social justice are so deeply interconnected that no movement — and no solution to social ills — can succeed in isolation. Rather than focus on individual movements, we therefore focus on the connections between and among movements and the flow of people, organizations, and ideas, all in the hope of better representing the true histories of social engagement in America and laying the foundation for a deeper understanding of the experience of social change.

A related feature of SCUA’s approach to collecting is our commitment to documenting “whole lives and whole communities.” Rather than focus just on a person’s “significant” actions or ideas, our goal is to represent the person’s entire life in all its complexity: the person’s background, the events themselves, and the aftermath, as well as the range of colleagues and organizations engaged. Our goal is not to highlight simply the great achievements and great people, but to reveal the broad underpinnings of influences, interests, and organizations that shaped them and the communities in which they operated.

Social change

Emphasizing the cross-fertilization between social movements and centers of activist energy, SCUA collects materials from individuals and organizations involved in the struggles for peace and non-violence, social and racial justice, economic justice, agricultural reform, environmentalism, sustainability, alternative energy, organized labor, gay rights, disability rights, spiritual activism, antinuclear activism, and intentional communities. Our collections branch out to include anti-fluoridation activism, campaigns for voting rights and clean elections, community and charitable organizations, and the history of revolutionary-era Europe (1789-1848).

  • African and African American history and culture: The history of race and ethnicity in America, with particular emphasis on the struggle for racial equality and social justice.
  • Agriculture, horticulture, botany: Including agricultural science and practice, horticulture, animal husbandry, natural history, organic farming, sustainable living, and heritage breeds.
  • Antinuclear movement: SCUA holds numerous collections documenting grassroots opposition to nuclear power and nuclear weaponry.
  • Arts management and arts administration:
    In partnership with the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts, and several other arts agencies, SCUA documents the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state and national arts agencies, we will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.
  • Cold War Culture: The culture of the Cold War, with an emphasis upon East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. Among other areas, SCUA has a strong interest in the Solidarity movement and in partnership with the DEFA Film Library, in East German cinema and graphic arts.
  • Disability: Organizational records and collections of personal papers documenting the history of disability and disability rights in the United States.
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender issues: Materials relating to the history and experience of the LGBTQ community and liberation struggles.
  • Labor, work, and industry: Organized labor, industrialization, manufacturing, business history, and the experience and culture of labor and working people.
  • Peace: Materials relating to the peace and antiwar movements and non-violence, with an emphasis on New England.
Innovation and entrepreneurship

SCUA collects materials that document innovative and entrepreneurial activities and particularly social entrepreneurship. Representative collections in SCUA include the papers of Mark H. McCormack (a pioneer in sport and entertainment marketing), Carl C. Harris (inventor and President of Rodney Hunt Co.), and numerous collections that document our region’s distinctive history of innovation in manufacturing and technology.

New England history and culture

The social, political, cultural, intellectual, literary, and economic life, with an emphasis upon western New England. The department houses thousands of books on New England cookery, with a particular emphasis on charitable and community cookbooks and cookbooks and ephemera published by corporations and the food industry.

  • Cookery and culinary history
    SCUA has thousands of cookbooks and other materials on New England regional cuisine, including community and charitable cookbooks, commercial cookbooks by New England authors, corporate cookbooks, and culinary ephemera.
  • Literature and the arts
    Emphasizing poets and writers, playwrights, and the performing arts in New England.
  • Politics and political culture
    SCUA has rich collections documenting the history and politics of the Commonwealth, including the papers of Congressmen Silvio O. Conte and John Olver, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, and State Representative John Clark; and the records of the Hampshire Council of Governments and several individual towns.
University Archives interests

Serving as the memory of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University Archives collects, preserves, and makes available official and non-official records documenting the people, policies, programs, facilities, and activities of the campus community, including its administration, departments and programs, faculty, and staff. The Archives avidly collects materials that reflect the lives and experiences of its students and alumni and that reflect our history as one of the Commonwealth’s two land grant institutions.

Other areas

SCUA has developed depth in a handful of other collecting areas, including:

  • American Study of Japan and Asia
    American relations with Japan from the Meiji period to the present, and connections with China and other Asian countries.
  • Protistology
    Records of the scholarly study of the protista (protozoans).

Concordance for the Archives, PQ

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]


Pagan Association, UMass (Religious Groups) (1989- )
see Portraits (Iconographic Materials) RG-182/2
see also Water Color Paintings (Memorabilia, general) RG-183/5
Pakistani Student Association (PSA) (1996- )
Pan Hellenic Council (1959-1983)
see also Social Union (1872-1940) RG-45/90/S6
Pandemonia (1971-1972)
Panoramic Photos
see Photo Archives Project (PAP) RG-172
Parachute Club, Sport (1975-1995)
Parchment, The Sylvan
see Sylvan Parchment, The (1976) RG-45/00/S11
Parents Day (Official University Committee) (1925)
Parents Newsletter (1962-1968)
Parking and Transportation Council (1972-1975)
see also Traffic and Parking Appeals Board (1972- ) RG-40/2/T7
Parking Appeals Board, Traffic and
see Traffic and Appeals Board (1972- ) RG-40/2/T7
Parking Coordinator, Transportation
see also Transit Service (Student Senate Committee) RG-45/7/T7
Parking Services (1994- ) RG-35/21
Parking Enforcement
see Parking Services RG-35/21
Parking Office
see Parking Coordinator RG-30/20
Parking Services (1994- ) RG-35/21
Parking Services (1994- )
Pass-Fail, ad hoc Sub-Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967)
Patent Review Committee (Faculty Senate, 1986-1987)
Pau, France–UMass Summer School at
see French and Italian Department–Pau, France (UMass Summer School) RG-25/F9
see Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (PAUMA) RG-40/5/P7
see also Professional Staff Organization (PSO) RG-40/5/P7.7
PAUMA Bulletin (1987-1989)
Payroll, Personnel
see Personnel, Payroll (Human Resources Office) RG-35/2
Peace and Justice in the Middle East, UMass Faculty and Staff for (unofficial organization) (1990-1991)
Peace Corps (UMass Training Program, Africa) (1962)
see International Programs RG-6/4/9
Peace in Central America, Faculty and Staff for (unofficial organization)
Peacemakers, UMass (1982-1984)
see also Peacemakers Records (1963-1990) MS309
Peer Sex Education Program RG-30/15/2/2

Pelham Quarry
see Quarry, Pelham (Physical Plant) (1866) RG-36/50/Q8
People for A Socially Responsible University (PSRU)(Student Social Action Group) (1989-1990)
People For Choice (Student Social Action Group) (1989)
People’s Gay Alliance
see Gay Alliance, People’s (Lesbian, Bisexual and Gay Alliance) RG-45/40/G3
People’s Market (1974- )
People’s Market — Collective Works (2002)
see Collective Works (People’s Market) (2002) RG-45/00/C4.9
People’s News-Stand (1975-1977)
see Political Economy Research Instiute (PERI) (1998- ) RG-25/E1.6
Personnel Affairs, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1971)
Personnel and Financial Services, Director of
see Business Office, Director of Personnel and Financial Services RG-35/3
Personnel, Assistant Vice President for Labor Relations
see Assistant Vice President for Labor Relations and Personnel RG-3/17/1
Personnel Office Newsletter (1962, 1966-1968, 1972-1975)
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Classified Employment Opportunities
see Classified Employment Opportunities ("Yellow Sheet") RG-35/2
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Employment Opportunities
see Employment Opportunities ("Beige Sheet") RG-35/2
Personnel/Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Personnel Office Newsletter
see Personnel Office Newsletter RG-35/2
Personnel Policies ad hoc Committee on, Multicampus Academic (1974-75)
see Inter-Campus Committees (2-campus and 3-campus) RG-3/100
Personnel, Vice President for Labor Relations and, Assistant
see Vice President for Labor Relations and Personnel, Assistant RG-3/17/1
Perspectives (Housing Services) (1980-1985)
Pest Control Guide for Commercial Growers in Massachusetts and Connecticut
see Extension Service, Cooperative– Pest Control Guide for Commercial Growers in
Massachusetts and Connecticut (1971-1975) RG-15/8
Pesticide Chemical Information Center
Phi Alpha Theta (Honor Society)
Phi Beta Kappa (Honor Society) (1932- )
Phi Beta Kappa News Bulletin (1937-1965)
see also Key Reporter, The (1936-1963, 1974-1978) RG-40/3/P3
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program
see Phi Beta Kappa RG-40/3/P3
Phi Beta Sigma (1985-1989)
Phi Delta Kappa (1984, 1993)
Phi Eta Sigma (Honor Society)
Phi Kappa Phi (Honor Society) (1904- )
Phi Mu Delta (1980-1993)
Phi Sigma Alpha (Honor Society)
Phi Sigma Delta (1978, 1985)
Phi Sigma Kappa (1873-1973)
Phi Sigma Pi (1996)
Philosophy Department
Phonodiscs (Sound Recordings)
Photo Archives Project (PAP)
Photo Center (Photographic and Motion Picture Services)
Photo Center Slide Collection
Photo Collection, Fred Moore
see Fred Moore Photo Collection RG-173
Photo Negatives Collection
see University Photo Negatives Collection RG-171
Photographer’s Association (1962-1973)
Photographic and Motion Picture Services
see Photo Center (Photographic and Motion Picture Services) RG-5/7
Photographic Services (University Relations and Development)
see Photo Center RG-5/7
RG-100 thru RG-176
Photographs (proof sheets)
see Proof Sheets (photographs) RG-176
Photography Club, University
see Photographer’s Association RG-45/40/P5
Photos, Oversize
see Oversize Photos RG-175
see also Lithographs RG-182/1
Photos, Panoramic
see Panoramic Photos RG-170
Physical Education, Men’s Department
Physical Education, Professional Preparation in
Physical Education, School of
see School of Physical Education RG-18
Physical Education, Women’s Department (WOPE)
Physical Plant (Department)
Physical Plant Department, Director
Physical Plant Publications
see also Mainstay (Physical Plant) (1969-1978) RG-36/00
Physical Plant Subject Files
Physical Sciences Library (1961- )
Physics and Astronomy–Cognitive Development Project
Physics and Astronomy Department
See also collections relating to members of the Physics Department
Physics and Astronomy–Five College Astronomical Society
Physics and Astronomy–Five College Radio and Astronomy Observatory
Physics and Astronomy–Scientific Reasoning Research Institute
Pi Beta Phi (1964-1966)
Pi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) (1988)
Pi Tau Sigma (Honor Society)
Picketing, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967-1971,1987)
Picketing and Recruitment, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1987)
Pierce College (School of Management)
see Phi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) RG-45/90/P5.9
Pistol Team
see Sports-Men’s Pistol Team (1966) RG-18/2
Placement Files (Microfilm)
Placement Service, Career Planning and
see Career Planning and Placement Service RG-30/9/5
see also Placement File (Microfilm) RG-190/1
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Planning and Budget, Office of
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Planning and Facilities Development, Office of
Planning and Resource Development Series
see Holdsworth Natural Resources Center–Planning and Resource Development Series (#’s 1-28) RG-15/3
Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1970-1980)
see also Campus Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1956-1960, 1974-1975) RG-40/2/A3
Campus Physical Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1974- ) RG-40/2/A3
Master Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1961-1974) RG-40/2/A3
Long Range Planning Committee, ad hoc (Faculty Senate, 1966-1971) RG-40/2/A3
Planning Office (1965- )
Planning, Project
see Director of Business Procedure and Project Planning RG-3/4/5
Planning, Vice President for
see Vice President for Planning RG-3/7
Plans (Cartographic Materials)
Plant and Soil Sciences Department
Plant Biology
Plant Pathology Department
Plant Pathology–Florists’ and Gardeners’ Club
Plaque (Student Publication) (1939)
Plaques (Memorial)
see Memorial Stones and Plaques (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/M4
see also Plaques (Memorabilia, General) RG-183/3
Plaques (Memorabilia, general)
see also Memorial Stones and Plaques RG-36/50/M4
Plato User’s Group Newsletter, UMass
see Massachusetts CAI Consortium Newsletter (1985- ) RG-29/00
Plays, Films and (Posters)
see Films and Plays (Poster Collection) RG-180/4
Poetry Circular (Student Publication) (1963)
Pointers for Pork Profits
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Pointers for Pork Profits (1949, 1954, 1968-1974) RG-15/8
Police Officers, International Brotherhood of
see International Brotherhood of Police Officers (NAGE) RG-40/5/P6
Polish Farmer’s Day (1911-1924)
Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) (1998- )
Political Science Department
Political Science Department–Public Administration, Graduate Program
Polity (Political Science Department) (1968- )
Polo Team
see Sports-Men’s Polo Team (ca. 1896) RG-18/2
Polymer Research
see Center for University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers (CUMIRP) RG-25/P7.5
Polymer Research Institute
see also Polymer Science and Engineering Program RG-25/P7
Polymer Science and Engineering Program
see Plant and Soil Sciences RG-25/P4
Pond, Campus
see Campus Pond and Isle of View (Physical Plant) RG-36/104/P6
Poor Women’s Task Force (Everywoman’s Center)
Population Studies, Certificate Program in
Portraits (Iconographic Materials)
Portuguese Club (1976-1977)
Portuguese Department
see Hispanic Literature and Linguistics RG-25/H4
Post-War Period, Massachusetts State College in the
see Massachusetts State College in the Post-War Period (Official University Committee) (1944) RG-40/2/M4.5
Poster Collection
Poster Collection, Miscellaneous/Art
Poultry Club (1927-1954)
see Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989) RG-45/80/P7
Pow-Wow (Student Publication) (1948)
Precisionettes (Special Student Interest Group) (1946-1965)
Pre-Law Association (1966-1986)
Pre-Medical Society (1982)
President, Selection Committee to Advice on (Faculty Senate, 1969)
President, Selection of a (Official University Committee) (1927, 1932-1933, 1968-1969)
President’s Cabinet
see Cabinet, President’s RG-3/12
Presidents, Individual (1864- ) RG-3/1
see also Presidents (Photographs) RG-110/1
President’s Office
President’s Office, Organization Charts (1967- )
President’s Office, Publications (1948- )
Presidents Photographs
Press, Committee on Faculty Senate (Faculty Senate, 1962- )
Press Information (Commencement)
Press, UMass
see University Press RG-10/4
Principal Investigators, Faculty Group of (1978)
Print Shop (Campus Center)
Printed Materials (Oversize Materials)
Printout (Massachusetts Data, Center for) (1983-1984)
Privacy Task Force
see Committees in Student Affairs–Privacy Task Force RG-30/1/3
Prize Essays
see Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
see Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
Process Design and Control, Center in, Industry/University
see Chemical Engineering Department–Industry/University Center In Process Design and Control RG-25/C2/3
see Design and Production RG-39/6
Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (PAUMA)
Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst–Bulletin (PAUMA)
see PAUMA Bulletin RG-40/5/P7
Professional Employees, Union of
see Union of Professional Employees (UPE) RG-40/5/P8
Professional Personnel, Chancellor’s Committee on (1966-1972)
Professional Preparation in Physical Education
see Physical Education, Professional Preparation in RG-25/P3.3
Professional Schools, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Professional Schools, Associate (1971-1976) RG-6/14
see also Schools themselves RG-12 thru 18
Professional Staff Appeals Committee
Professional Staff Organization (PSO) (1984- )
Professors, American Association of University
see American Association of University Professors (AAUP) RG-40/5/A2
Program and Budget Council of Faculty Senate (Faculty Senate, 1973- )
Program for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns (1986- )
see also People’s Gay Alliance RG-45/40/G3
Lesbian Union RG-45/40/L4
Program Groups (Student)
see Fine Arts/program groups (Student) RG-45/45/50
Programs, Academic
see Academic Departments, Programs, Institutes, Centers RG-25
Programs (School of Education) (1967-1977)
Progress Report (Experiment Station, 1888- )
see Experiment Station (1888- )–Progress Report (1962- ) RG-15/2.2
Progressive Candidates Pool
Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989-1996)
Progressive Student (Student Publications) (1984)
Project ABLE (Affirmative Business Leadership Education) (School of Management)
Project Bridge (1968)
Project I Can (College of Arts and Sciences) (1992)
Project Pulse
see Student Affairs Research and Education Office (SAREO) RG-30/27
Project STRIDE (Springfield Teacher Recruitment to Increase Diversity In Education (1996- )
Project 10, Inquiry Program
see also Inquiry Program (School of Education) RG-13/4/2/1
Proof Sheets/Contact Sheets (Photographs)
Property and Receiving
Protests and Demonstrations, Student
see Student Protests and Demonstrations RG-45/101
see Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost RG-6/1
Provost, Assistant to the
Provost for Faculty Relations, Associate (1983-1989)
Provost for Professional Schools, Associate (1971-1976)
see also schools themselves RG- 12-18
Provost for Special Programs, Associate (1968-1982)
see also departments RG-25/A-Z
Provost for Undergraduate Education, Associate (1972-1973, 1981- )
Provost for University Outreach, Interim Vice
Provost for Women and Minority Groups, Associate (1968-1981)
see also Affirmative Action Office RG-4/7
Everywoman’s Center RG-7/2
Provost’s Administrative Council
see Deans Council; Provost’s Administrative Council; Academic Deans Meeting (1955-1972) RG-6/2
Provost’s Task Force on Academic Computing
see Computing, Provosts Task Force on Academic (1984-1985) RG-40/2/C6.7
see Pakistani Student Association (PSA) (1996- )
Psi Chi (Honor Society) RG-45/60/P7

see Professional Staff Organization (PSO) (1984- ) RG-40/5/P7.7
see People for a Socially Responsible University (PSRU) (Student Social Action Group) RG-45/80/P5
Psychological Services Center
Psychology Department
Psychology Department–Behavioral Biology, Dept. of
Psychology Department–Cognitive Science Society
Psychology Newsletter (1987- 1990)
Psychometric and Evaluation Research, Laboratory of (School of Education)
Public Administration, Bureau of
see Bureau of Public Administration RG-25/P6.4
Public Administration, Graduate Program in
see Political Science Department–Public Administration, Graduate Program in RG-25/P6
Public Affairs
see also Public Affairs (President’s Office) RG-3/10
Public Affairs (President’s Office)
see also Public Affairs RG-5
Public Affairs, Director of
Public Affairs Publications
Public Art Sites, Galleries and
see Galleries & Public Art Sites (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/G2
Public Health Center, Northeast Regional Environmental
see Northeast Regional Environmental Public Health Center RG-17/1/1
Public Health, Division of
see School of Public Health and Health Sciences RG-17/1
Public Health, Division of–Biopharmaceutical Research Unit
Public Health, Division of–Biostatistics Technical Reports
Public Health, Division of–Newsletter (1984-1987)
Public Health, School of (1989-1993)
see School of Public Health and Health Sciences (1993- ) RG-17
Public Higher Education, Campus Convention on the Future of, Coordinating Committee on the
see Campus Convention on the Future of Public Education, Coordinating Committee on (1995- ) RG-40/3/C2
Public Information (President’s Office)
Public Information, Office of (Public Affairs)
see also Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development, RG-39/1.
Public Manager’s Notebook (1981-1988)
see Institute for Governmental Services (IGS) RG-3/8
Public Policy and Administration, Center for
see Center for Public Policy and Administration (CPPA) (1997- ) RG-25/P6.3
Public Policy Committee (Student Senate) (1986- )
Public-Private Records, Student Affairs Task Force on (1974- )
see Committee in Student Affairs–Privacy Task Force RG-30/1/3
Public Relations, Publications and
see Publications and Public Relations (1954-1956) RG-40/2/P9.2
Public Safety (Department)
see also Campus Safety News RG-30/17
Public Safety Department (Photographs)
Public Safety Monthly Summaries (1973-1990)
Public School Partnership (Five-College Inc. Program)
Public School Students, Tutoring Enrichment Assistance Model for
see Tutoring Enrichment Assistance Model for Public School Students (TEAMS) RG-7/12
Public Service Council (1968)
see Inter-Campus Committees–Public Service Council RG-3/100
Public Service Fund
see Healy Endowment/Public Service Fund (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/2/4
Public Services (Library)
Public Services Office (Library) (1953- )
Public Student Coalition (Student Association) (1976)
Publications (Official University Committee) (1916-1927)
Publications and Broadcast Board, Student (1966, 1969)
Publications and Public Relations (Official University Committee) (1954-1956)
Publications Committee (Faculty Senate, 1970)
Publications Department
Publications Office (Public Affairs)
Publications, Official
see Printed, mimeos, etc. (University as a Whole) RG-1/00
Publications Policy (Official University Committee) (1949-1950)
Publications, Student
see Student Publications RG-45/00
see UMass News (Release) RG-5/3
Publicity (Official University Committee) (1926-1927)
Publicity about UMass (Public Affairs)
Histories and historians ‘ files (1898- ) RG-1 201
Pulse, Project
see Student Affairs Research and Education Office (SAREO) RG-30/27


QTV Fraternity (1869-1997)
Quarry, Pelham (Physical Plant) (1866)
Quarterly, The (1958-1959)
see Collegian Quarterly (1938-1962) RG-45/00/C6.2
Quest Program, The (Chancellor’s Office) (1985- )
Questor (Student Publication) (1974)
Quilt Project, AIDS Memorial
see AIDS Memorial Quilt Project (1992- ) RG-11/20


Tulip poplar leaves

Tulip poplar leaves
Photograph by Arthur Mange

Drawing upon the unique materials under their care, the staff of the Department of Special Collections and University Archives organize two to three exhibits a year in their reading room and work regularly with their colleagues in the general library to prepare other exhibits for display on the Lower Level of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library.

Current Exhibit

Jazz is Alive: Jazz in UMass Amherst Libraries’ Special Collections

  • Sept. 28, 2015-Jan. 20, 2016
  • Location: SCUA and Learning Commons, Du Bois Library

In coordination with the Fall Reception, Jazz is Alive focuses on recently acquired jazz collections from UMass, Boston, and the Northeast in Special Collections and University Archives. Photographs include jazz greats plus posters, images, and memorabilia of the regional jazz scene and culture from the 1960s on.

Materials range from the Boston Jazz Society Collection and images of Boston jazz clubs in the Bernie Moss Collection to images from UMass’ Jazz in July performances by Robert Davis and Ronald Steele.

Several other collections on exhibit document composers and performers, including innovator Borah Bergman and retired UMass Amherst professor and Emeritus Director of the Fine Arts Center, Frederick Tillis.

Upcoming Exhibits

M.A.C. and the Women’s Land Army of America in World War I

  • Jan 2016-Sept 2016
  • Location: SCUA and Learning Commons, Du Bois Library

This exhibit investigates Massachusetts Agricultural College’s participation in the Women’s Land Army of America, a women’s organization to work in agriculture replacing men called up to the military from 1917-1922.

Photographs of Diana Mara Henry

  • Sept 2016-Jan 2017
  • Location: SCUA and Lower Level, Du Bois Library

The exhibit showcases the work of Diana Mara Henry, a rich evocation of four decades of political, social, and cultural change in America beginning in the late 1960s as seen through the life of one photojournalist. This diverse body of work is particularly rich in documenting the women’s movement, second wave feminism, and the political scene in the 1970s. Henry left a remarkable record of women in politics, with dozens of images of Bella Abzug, Elizabeth Holtzman, Shirley Chisholm, Liz Carpenter, Betty Friedan, Jane Fonda, and Gloria Steinem.


Exhibits online
Diana Mara Henry PhotographsPhotographer: DMH

Photographs from the collection of Diana Mara Henry
An exhibit by Chuck Abel.
E.D. HudsonE.D. Hudson: an Abolitionist Life

An examination of social reform and antislavery in Antebellum New England. An exhibit by Charles Weisenberger.
Rhetoric or researchRhetoric or Research

interprets student protests against CIA recruitment at UMass Amherst during the 1980s through a selection of images taken by student photojournalists.
By Tom Hohenstein (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
Gordon HeathSource, History, Story: Teaching U.S. History in the Archives

A digital curriculum for teaching U.S. history using archival resources.
An exhibit by Emily Oswald (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
I see dead peopleBehold And See As You Pass By

An online exhibit on gravestones and mortuary art in Early New England drawn from the Association for Gravestones Studies Collections.
By Molly Campbell (ETHIR recipient, 2011)
Robot readerUncertain Futures

Science fiction readership in the Cold War and beyond.
An exhibit by Morgan Hubbard.
Letters homeFifteen letters

Conrad D. Totman’s letters home from Korea, 1954-1955.
An exhibit by Alex McKenzie.
Du Bois photographsDu Bois: The Activist Life

An online exhibit on the life and legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois based on his papers.
A scarab beetleHerbals and Insects

A selection of rare botanical and entomological books from the SCUA collections.
A beeApiculture and culture

Books on bees and beekeeping.
An exhibit by Richard A. Steinmetz.



Field, William Franklin, 1922-

William F. Field Papers, 1948-1986.

27 (13.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 030/2 F5
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971

The University’s first Dean of Students, William F. Field held the post from 1961 until his retirement in 1988. The 27 years Field was Dean of Students was a critical time of growth and unrest, as the University’s student population more than tripled in size and the nation-wide movements for civil rights and against the Vietnam War were reflected through student activism and protest on the University’s campus. Responsible for ending student curfews and overseeing all dorms becoming co-ed, Field also worked with minority students and faculty to support the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

The William F. Field Papers document Field’s career as an administrator at the University of Massachusetts and specifically his role as Dean of Students from 1961-1988. The correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, and other official printed and manuscript documents are a rich resource for one of the most important and volatile eras in the University’s history. Of particular interest are extensive files on student protests and activism in the late 1960s and early 1970s and the growing diversity of the campus student population, flourishing of the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B. Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.


  • African American college students--Massachusetts
  • Field, William Franklin, 1922-
  • Race relations--United States
  • Universities and colleges--United States--Administration
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean of Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Afro-American Studies
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--United States

Types of material

  • Correspondence
  • Memorandums

Fischer, Britta

Britta Fischer, U.S.-China Peoples Friendship Association Photograph Collection, 1978.

449 items (1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 054

Founded in 1974, the U.S.-China Peoples Friendship Association was among the first American organizations devoted to fostering people-to-people diplomacy between the United States and the People’s Republic of China. The vision of veteran civil rights activist Unita Blackwell, the USCPFA sponsored speakers, seminars, and cultural exchanges, and in the 1970s, was among the first groups to organize tours from the United States to the People’s Republic.

The 449 color slides (35 mm.) that comprise the U.S.-China Peoples Friendship Association collection document one of the group’s early tours, undertaken at the height of the agitation over the Gang of Four. Beyond simple touristic scenes, the collection depicts a state-sponsored version of everyday life in China during the early post-Mao era.


  • Beijing (China)--Photographs
  • Children--China--Photographs
  • China--Photographs
  • Factories--China--Photographs
  • Great Wall of China (China)--Photographs
  • Jinan (China)--Photographs
  • Shanghai (China)--Photographs
  • Tian'an Men (Beijing, China)--Photographs
  • Yangzhou (China)--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photographs

Holland, W. L. (William Lancelot), 1907-

W. L. Holland Papers, 1922-2008.

4 boxes (5.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 782
W.L. Holland, 1938
W.L. Holland, 1938

Born in New Zealand in 1907, Bill Holland first traveled to Japan at the age of 21 to take part in the conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, beginning over thirty years of association with the organization. During his time at IPR, Holland held a number of leadership positions, including Research Secretary (1933-1944), Secretary-General (1946-1960), and editor of its periodicals Far Eastern Survey and Pacific Affairs. He took leave from the IPR twice: to study for a MA in economics under John Maynard Keynes at Cambridge (1934) and, during the Second World War, to become acting director of the Office of War Information in Chungking, China. Founded on an internationalist philosophy as a forum to discuss relations between Pacific nations, the IPR was targeted under the McCarthy-era McCarran act during the 1950s, accused of Communist sympathies. After political pressure led the IPR to disband in 1960, Holland accepted a position on faculty with the newly created Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia (1961-1972), helping to lead that department to international prominence. He remained in BC until the death of his wife Doreen in 1990, after which he settled in Amherst to live with his only child, Patricia G. Holland. Holland died in Amherst in May 2008.

The Holland Papers are a dense assemblage of correspondence of Bill Holland, his wife Doreen, and their family, from his first trip abroad in the 1920s through the time of his death. Although largely personal in nature, the letters offer important insight into Holland’s travel in pre-war Asia, his work with the IPR, the war, and the of the 1950s. The collection also includes a wealth of photographs, including two albums documenting trips to Japan, China, and elsewhere 1929-1933.


  • China--Description and travel
  • Japan--Description and travel
  • World War, 1939-1945


  • Holland, Doreen P.
  • Institute of Pacific Relations

Types of material

  • Photographs


Kaisando Temple
Kaisando Temple

Within a decade of its founding, the Massachusetts Agricultural College began to forge what would become fast ties with its counterparts in Japan. Seeking to establish a thoroughly modern college in Hokkaido, the Imperial Government in Japan looked to America for a model of innovation in agricultural education, settling quickly on MAC. With the leadership of William Smith Clark, a succession of faculty, students, and alumni helped develop the Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaido University).

The Dept. of Special Collections at UMass Amherst (SCUA) houses several collections from those early exchanges, including the papers of William Smith Clark and his students and colleagues William Brooks and William Wheeler, along with the remarkable collections associated with the geologist Benjamin Smith Lyman, a resident of Northampton. These collections have formed a core on which SCUA continues to build. Today, the department specializes in documenting the American study of Japanese history and culture, particularly in the post-war period.

Selected collections

  • Beato, Felice. Papers, ca. 1863-1871.
    • As a photographer, Beato was an important chronicler of late-Edo and early-Meiji era Japan.
  • Brooks, William Penn. Papers, 1863-1939.
    • Invited by the Japanese government — and his mentor, William Smith Clark — to help establish the Sapporo Agricultural College, modeled on the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Spending over a decade in Hokkaido, Brooks helped to introduce western scientific agricultural practices and the outlines of a program in agricultural education, and he built a solid foundation for the School.
  • Clark, William Smith. 1814-2003 (bulk: 1844-1886).
    • Held the presidency of Massachusetts Agricultural College (now University of Massachusetts Amherst) from 1867-1879, and helped to found Sapporo Agricultural College (now Hokkaido University) in Japan in 1876.
  • Lewis, Gertrude. Papers, 1920-2001.
    • An educator for most her life, Lewis ‘s papers document changes within theory and pedagogy over time and in various geographic locales, including Japan, in the field of education.
  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith
    • Papers, 1831-1921. Prominent geologist and mining engineer, Lyman was invited by the Meiji government in Japan to help introduce modern geological surveying and mining techniques during the 1870s and 1880s.
    • Japanese Book Collection, 1710-1898. During his years as a consultant to the Meiji government in Japan, Benjamin Smith Lyman accumulated a large collection of books printed in Japan. His book collection includes works on language to literature, religion, the arts, and culture.
  • Maki, John. Papers.
    • Japanese-American professor of political science at UMass who worked on contemporary Japan, militarism, and post-war constitution. Maki served in U.S. Army Intelligence during the Second World War, and spent several months in Japan in 1946 as part of the Occupation administration.
  • Passin, Herbert. Collection, 1944-1955.
    • Inducted into the Army in 1941 and assigned to duty in Tokyo in December 1945, he became chief of the Public Opinion and Sociological Research Division under Gen. Douglas MacArthur. During his tour of duty, Passin coordinated a series of sociological studies of Japanese village life to help guide U.S. Occupation policy, particularly as it dealt with land and labor reform.
  • Stockbridge, Levi. Papers, 1841-1878.
    • Pioneering agriculturist and president of Massachusetts Agricultural College, whose son, Horace Edward Stockbridge, taught at Hokkaido University and sent descriptions of his travel in Japan home.
  • Totman, Conrad. Papers, 1800-2005.
    • A professor of Japanese history at Yale, Totman’s collection a treasure trove of information on Japan in general, and particularly on his specialties: early modern Japan and forestry and environmental management.
  • Wheeler, William. Papers, 1876-1930.
    • Joined Massachusetts Agricultural College President William Smith Clark and two other alumni of the college in helping to found the Sapporo Agricultural College in Japan (now Hokkaido University), succeeding Clark as president of the school from 1877 to 1879.
  • Yamashita, Yoskiaki. Photograph album, ca. 1904.
    • Professor from Tokyo who traveled the United States providing instruction in the new martial art of judo from 1903-1960.
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