Results for: “University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Food Science” (975 collections)SCUA

Concordance for the Archives, W

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W

WAGES
see Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) RG-45/40/W6
Wail, Summer School
see Summer School Wail RG-45/00/S10
Walden Learning Center
see Psychology Department RG-25/P8/3
Waltham Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Field Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Suburban Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Ward Commission
see Massachusetts Commission on Corruption (Ward Commission) RG-36/23
Wareham Agricultural Engineering Laboratory
see Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Wareham Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory
see Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Washington Irving Literary Society (1867-1892)
RG-45/40/W3
see also Literary Society (1953-1959) RG-40/3/L4
Waste Prevention, National Environmental Technology for
see National Environmental Technology for Waste Prevention Institute (NETI) RG-25/N3
Water Color Paintings (Memorabilia, general)
RG-183/5
Water Crisis, UMass Amherst (Physical Plant) (1980-1989)
RG-36/50/W3
see also Water Supply (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/W4
Water Polo
see Sports, Men’s Water Polo (1992) RG-18/2
Sports, Women’s Water Polo (1995- ) RG-18/2
Water Resources Research Center (WRRC)
RG-25/W2
Water Resources Research Center–Annual Reports (1968, 1970- )
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Completion Reports (1969-1977)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Newsletter (1983-1993)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Publications
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Special Reports
RG-25/W2/00
Water Supply (Physical Plant)
RG-36/50/W4
see also Water Crisis (1980-1989) RG-36/50/W3
Waugh Arboretum (Physical Plant) (1944)
RG-36/104/W3
Waugh Memorial Garden Committee (Faculty Senate, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of RG-25/A4
W. E. B. Du Bois Library
see Library Buildings-Tower (University Library/W.E.B. Du Bois Library) (1961- ) RG-8/5/3
W.E.B. Du Bois Petition Coalition (1993-1995)
RG-45/80/W4
Weekly Biff, The (Student Publication) (1910)
RG-45/00/W4
Weekly Bulletin (1971-1985)
see Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
Weekly News, The (Student Publication) (1989)
RG-45/00/W5
Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin (1912-1985)
RG-5/00/3
see also University Bulletin (newsprint format) RG-5/00/6
Campus Chronicle (newspaper)(1985- ) RG-5/00/10
West Campus Design Proposal (1993) (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/W4
Western European Area Studies (Program and Committee)
RG-25/W3
Western Massachusetts Latin American Solidarity Committee
see Latin American Solidarity Committee, Western Massachusetts RG-45/80/L3
WFCR of Note (1991- )
RG-60/8
WFCR Program Guide (1966-1991)
RG-60/8
WFCR Radio Station
RG-60/8
WFCR Weekly Classified Music (1993- )
RG-60/8
Wheel (Student Social Action Group) (1986)
RG-45/80/W3
WIG
see Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5
Wilder Times (Landscape Architecture Department) (1972-1993)
RG-25/L2/00
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative
(College of Food and Natural Resources) RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative–Contributions (1970-1974)
RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (Massachusetts Cooperative)
see Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (1948-1988) RG-15/6
Winter, Alumni Day
see Mid-Winter Alumni Day (1923-1926) RG-40/2/M5
Winter School
see Summer School, Short Courses RG-6/17
WISPP
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/P7
WMUA (FM Radio Station) (1948- )
RG-45/30/W6
WOCH (Orchard Hill Radio Station) (1987- )
RG-45/30/W7
Women, Advisory Council of
see Advisory Council of Women (1921-1964) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
see also Advisory Council of Women (Film, ca. 1927) RG-186/100/1
Women and Minority Groups, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Women and Minority Groups, Associate (1968-1981) RG-6/13
see also Affirmative Action Office (1982- ) RG-4/7
Everywoman’s Center RG-7/2
Women, Dean of
see Dean of Women RG-30/3
see also Dean of Women, Helen Curtis (1902-1993) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5

Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP)
RG-40/5/W5
Women, National Organization for
see National Organization for Women (NOW) (1989- ) RG-45/80/N7
Women, New England Council of Land-Grant University
see New England Council of Land-Grant University Women RG-60/1/1
Women of Color Program (1993-1998) /Women of Color Leadership Network (WOCLN) (1998- )
(Everywoman’s Center ) RG-7/2/2/9
see also Third World Women’s Programmer (1979-1989) RG-7/2/2/5
Women, Status of, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1970- )
RG-40/2/A3
Women, University
see University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) (1985-1989)
RG-45/40/W6
Women’s Caucus and Vietnam Veterans Against the War (1971-1972)
RG-45/80/W5
Women’s Clubs
see Engineering Faculty Women’s Club (Engineering Wives) RG-40/7/3
New Comer’s Club RG-40/7/2
University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Conference, Five-College
see Five-College Women’s Conference, Valley Women’s Studies Journal RG-60/9
Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
see Women’s Equity Project RG-7/2/2/1
Women’s Equity Project (1972-1984)
RG-7/2/2/1
Note: Formerly Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
Women’s Health, Center for Research and Education in
see Center for Research and Education in Women’s Health (CREWH) RG-17/1/2
Women’s Leadership Project (1984-1989)
RG-45/80/W6
Women’s Network, Graduate
see Graduate Women’s Network (1994- ) RG-45/40/G7
Women’s News in the Collegian (Official University Committee) (1978)
RG-40/2/W6
Women’s Physical Education (WOPE)
see Physical Education, Women’s RG-25/P3.2
Women’s Program Development
RG-7/8
Women’s Programmer, Third World
see Third World Women’s Programmer RG-7/2/2/5
Women’s Rights, Progressive Organization of
see Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989- ) RG-45/80/P7
Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA)
RG-45/4
see also Women’s Student Government Association Handbooks for Women (1925-1941) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women’s Studies Newsletter (1976- ) RG-25/W5/00

Women’s Studies Program
RG-25/W5
Wood Science and Technology
RG-25/W7
WOPE Department
see Physical Education, Women’s Department (WOPE) RG-25/P3.2
Worcester Medical School
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
Wrestling
see Sports, Men’s Wrestling (1965, 1970-1971) RG-18/2
Writing Program
RG-25/E3/1
see also University Writing Program RG-7/11
Writing Program, ad hoc Committee for (Faculty Senate, 1982- )
RG-40/2/A3
WRRC
see Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) (1970- ) RG-25/W2
WSGA
see Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) RG-45/4
WSUR (Southwest Radio Station) (1998)
RG-45/30/W8
WSYL (Sylvan Radio Station) (1986)
RG-45/30/W9

Field, William Franklin, 1922-

William F. Field Papers, 1948-1986.

27 (13.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 030/2 F5
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971

The University’s first Dean of Students, William F. Field held the post from 1961 until his retirement in 1988. The 27 years Field was Dean of Students was a critical time of growth and unrest, as the University’s student population more than tripled in size and the nation-wide movements for civil rights and against the Vietnam War were reflected through student activism and protest on the University’s campus. Responsible for ending student curfews and overseeing all dorms becoming co-ed, Field also worked with minority students and faculty to support the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

The William F. Field Papers document Field’s career as an administrator at the University of Massachusetts and specifically his role as Dean of Students from 1961-1988. The correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, and other official printed and manuscript documents are a rich resource for one of the most important and volatile eras in the University’s history. Of particular interest are extensive files on student protests and activism in the late 1960s and early 1970s and the growing diversity of the campus student population, flourishing of the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B. Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

Subjects

  • African American college students--Massachusetts
  • Field, William Franklin, 1922-
  • Race relations--United States
  • Universities and colleges--United States--Administration
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean of Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Afro-American Studies
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--United States

Types of material

  • Correspondence
  • Memorandums

Machmer, William L.

William L. Machmer Papers, 1899-1953.

18 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 006/1 M33
William L. Machmer
William L. Machmer

Enjoying one of the longest tenures of any administrator in the history of the University of Massachusetts, William Lawson Machmer served under five presidents across 42 years, helping to guide the university through an economic depression, two world wars, and three name changes. During his years as Dean, Machmer witnessed the growth of the university from fewer than 500 students to almost 3,800, and helped guide its transformation from a small agricultural college into Massachusetts State College (1931) and finally into the University of Massachusetts (1947).

Machmer’s papers chronicle the fitful development of the University of Massachusetts from the days of Kenyon Butterfield’s innovations of the 1920s through the time of the GI Bill. The collection is particularly strong in documenting the academic experience of students and the changes affecting the various departments and programs at the University, with particular depth for the period during and after the Second World War.

Connect to another siteView selected records on women's affairs at UMass, 1924-1951

Subjects

  • Agricultural education
  • Fort Devens (Mass.)
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College
  • Massachusetts State College
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Mathematics
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Baker, Hugh Potter, 1878-
  • Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935
  • Lewis, Edward M
  • Machmer, William L
  • Van Meter, Ralph Albert, 1893-

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Student records

Radical Student Union (RSU)

Radical Student Union Records, 1905-2006 (Bulk: 1978-2005).

22 boxes (14.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 045/80 R1

Founded by Charles Bagli in 1976, the Revolutionary Student Brigade at UMass Amherst (later the Radical Student Union) has been a focal point for organization by politically radical students. RSU members have responded to issues of social justice, addressing both local, regional, and national concerns ranging from militarism to the environment, racism and sexism to globalization.

The RSU records document the history of a particularly long-lived organization of left-leaning student activists at the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Beginning in the mid-1970s, as students were searching for ways to build upon the legacy of the previous decade, the RSU has been a constant presence on campus, weathering the Reagan years, tough budgetary times, and dramatic changes in the political culture at the national and state levels. The RSU reached its peak during the 1980s with protests against American involvement in Central America, CIA recruitment on campus, American support for the Apartheid regime in South Africa, and government-funded weapons research, but in later years, the organization has continued to adapt, organizing against globalization, sweatshops, the Iraq War, and a host of other issues.

Subjects

  • Anti-apartheid movements--Massachusetts
  • Central America--Foreign relations--United States
  • College students--Political activity
  • Communism
  • El Salvador--History--1979-1992
  • Guatemala--History--1945-1982
  • Iraq War, 2003-
  • Nicaragua--History--1979-1990
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts
  • Persian Gulf War, 1991
  • Political activists--Massachusetts--History
  • Racism
  • Socialism
  • Student movements
  • United States--Foreign relations--Central America
  • United States. Central Intelligence Agency
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst

Contributors

  • Progressive Student Network
  • Radical Student Union
  • Revolutionary Student Brigade

Types of material

  • Banners

Southeast Asia

Southeast Asia Collection, 1925-1986.


Call no.: MS 407

The Southeast Asia Collection highlights the regional wars from the 1970s to the 1980s, including a series on Southeast Asian refugees in America, along with materials on regional economic development, especially in the Mekong River Basin. The collection contains hundreds of reports on agricultural and industrial projects in the region, examining everything from the impact of electrification on village life in Thailand to a description of a Soviet-built hospital in Cambodia in 1961, to an assessment of herbicide in Vietnam in 1971.

Collected primarily by Joel Halpern and James Hafner, the collection includes background, field, and situation reports by U.S. Operations Missions and U.S. Agency for International Development; reports, publications, statistics, and background information from other U.S. government agencies, governments of Laos and Thailand, and the United Nations; correspondence, reports, and reference materials of nongovernmental organizations; reports and essays by individuals about Southeast Asia; news releases and newspapers; published and unpublished bibliographies; and interviews with U.S. military personnel. Most material comes from governmental and organizational sources, but there are papers by, and debriefs of, numerous individuals.

Subjects

  • Cambodia--History--1953-1975
  • Laos--History
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Contributors

  • Hafner, James
  • Halpern, Joel Martin

Topol, Sidney

Sidney Topol Papers, 1944-1997.

52 boxes (78 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 374
Sidney Topol
Sidney Topol

An innovator and entrepreneur, Sidney Topol was a contributor to several key developments in the telecommunications industries in the latter half of the twentieth century. A graduate of the University of Massachusetts (1947) and an engineer and executive at Raytheon and later Scientific-Atlanta, Topol’s expertise in microwave systems led to the development of the first effective portable television relay links, allowing broadcasts from even remote areas, and his foray into satellite technologies in the 1960s provided the foundation for building the emerging cable television industry, permitting the transmission of transoceanic television broadcasts. Since retiring in the early 1990s, Topol has been engaged in philanthropic work, contributing to the educational and cultural life in Boston and Atlanta.

The product of a pioneer in the telecommunications and satellite industries and philanthropist, this collection contains a rich body of correspondence and speeches, engineering notebooks, reports, product brochures, and photographs documenting Sidney Topol’s forty year career as an engineer and executive. The collection offers a valuable record of Topol’s role in the growth of both corporations, augmented by a suite of materials stemming from Topol’s tenure as Chair of the Electronic Industries Association Advanced Television Committee (ATV) in the 1980s and his service as Co-Chair of a major conference on Competitiveness held by the Carter Center in 1988.

Subjects

  • Boston (Mass.)--Social conditions--20th century
  • Cable television
  • Electronic Industries Association
  • Raytheon Company
  • Scientific-Atlanta

Contributors

  • Topol, Sidney

Waugh, Frank A. (Frank Albert), 1869-1943

Frank A. Waugh Papers, 1896-1983.


Call no.: FS 088
Frank A Waugh with flute
Frank A Waugh with flute

Born in Wisconsin but raised and educated in Kansas, Frank Waugh got his first teaching job at Oklahoma State University. He went on to teach at the University of Vermont and finally settled down in Amherst, as a professor at Massachusetts Agricultural College. While at Mass Aggie, he became well know for establishing the second landscape gardening department in the country, later the department of landscape architecture. At a time when the field of landscape architecture was still taking root, Waugh’s influence was significant in shaping the profession. His contributions include numerous articles and books, the designs he planned and implemented, and the many students he taught and mentored. A natural offshoot of his work as a landscape architect, Waugh pursued other artistic avenues as well, most notably photography and etching. He served at MAC, later Massachusetts State College, for nearly forty years before retiring in 1939.

The collection includes an extensive representation of Waugh’s published articles along with biographical materials. The centerpiece, however, is the large number of photographs, lantern slides, and etchings. While his publications reveal the mind of a pioneer in his field, together these images portray the heart and soul of Waugh as an artist.

Subjects

  • Landscape architecture--United States--History
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Horticulture

Contributors

  • Waugh, Frank A. (Frank Albert), 1869-1943

Types of material

  • Etchings
  • Lantern slides
  • Photographs

Anglin family

Anglin Family Papers, 1874-1955 (Bulk: 1914-1926).

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 699
Anglin family and friends, ca.1921
Anglin family and friends, ca.1921

Born in Cork, Ireland to a prosperous family, the Anglin siblings began immigrating to Canada and the United States in 1903. The first to relocate to Canada, brothers Will and Sydney pursued vastly different careers, one as a Presbyterian minister and the other as a salesman at a Toronto slaughterhouse. George and Crawford both served in the military during World War I, the former in the British Infantry as a medical officer and the latter in the 4th University Overseas Company first in France and later in Belgium where he died saving the life of a wounded soldier. Gladys Anglin trained as a nurse, but worked in a Canadian department store and at the Railway Office before suffering a mental breakdown and entering the Ontario Hospital as a patient. Ethel remained in Ireland the longest where she taught Domestic Economics at a technical school. The only Anglin to immigrate to the United States and the only female sibling to marry, Ida and husband David Jackson settled in Monson, Massachusetts where they raised four daughters.

The Anglin siblings were part of a close knit family who stayed in contact despite their geographic separation through their correspondence. Siblings wrote and exchanged lengthy letters that document not only family news, but also news of local and national significance. Topics addressed in their letters include World War I, the Irish revolution, medicine, religious ministry, and domestic issues from the ability of a single woman to support herself through work to child rearing.

Subjects

  • Anglin family--Correspondence
  • Ireland--Emigration and immigration--History
  • Ireland--History--War of Independence, 1919-1921
  • Irish--Canada--History
  • Irish--United States--History
  • World War, 1914-1918

Bates Family

Marcia Grover Church Bates Family Papers, 1712-1999.

11 boxes (5.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 424

Generations of the Bates and Church families based in North Amherst and Ashfield, Massachusetts. Papers include deeds, a will, correspondence, account books (recording day-to-day expenditures on food, clothing, postage, housekeeping supplies, and laborer’s wages), diaries, an oral history, photographs, genealogical notes, and memorabilia related to the family.

Subjects

  • Ashfield (Mass.)--History
  • Bates family
  • Church family
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Ashfield
  • Hotelkeepers--Massachusetts--North Amherst
  • Libraries--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--North Amherst
  • North Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Prescott (Mass.)--History
  • Public librarians--Massachusetts
  • Street-railroads--Massachusetts--Employees
  • Weather--Massachusetts--Ashfield
  • Women--Massachusetts--History
  • Worcester (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Bates, Marcia Church, 1908-2000
  • Church, Cornelia, 1906-1978
  • Church, Lucia Grover, 1877-1943

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Deeds
  • Diaries
  • Geneaologies
  • Photographs
  • Wills

Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873

Henry James Clark Papers, 1865-1872.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 048
Trichodina pediculus
Trichodina pediculus

The first professor of Natural History at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, Henry James Clark, had one of the briefest and most tragic tenures of any member of the faculty during the nineteenth century. Having studied under Asa Gray and Louis Agassiz at Harvard, Clark became an expert microscopist and student of the structure and development of flagellate protozoans and sponges. Barely a year after joining the faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College at its first professor of Natural History, Clark died of tuberculosis on July 1, 1873.

A small remnant of a brief, but important career in the natural sciences, the Henry James Clark Papers consist largely of obituary notices and a fraction of his published works. The three manuscript items include two letters from Clark’s widow to his obituarist and fellow naturalist, Alpheus Hyatt (one including some minor personal memories), and a contract to build a house on Pleasant Street in Amherst.

Subjects

  • Developmental biology
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Veterinary Science
  • Protozoans

Contributors

  • Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873
  • Clark, Mary Young Holbrook
  • Hyatt, Alpheus, 1838-1902

Types of material

  • Contracts
  • Letters (Correspondence)
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