Results for: “Latin America--History” (612 collections)SCUA

Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-

Alexander E. Cance Papers, 1911-1951.

6 boxes (2.75 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 045
Alexander E. Cance
Alexander E. Cance

Professor and Head of the Agricultural Economics Department at the Massachusetts Agricultural College who also worked briefly for Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Herbert Hoover, as well as the United States Department of Agriculture.

Includes biographical materials, correspondence concerning Cance’s role in the agricultural cooperative movement, addresses, articles (both in typescript and published), lectures, book reviews, typescript of a Carnegie study of factors in agricultural economics, a summary of a U.S. Senate report of which he was co-author, “Agricultural Cooperation and Rural Credit in Europe,” and research material. No documentation of his role as a delegate to the Hoover Conference on Economic Crisis, 1920, or his position as Supervisor of Market Research with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1922.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural Economics
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural Economics
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty

Contributors

  • Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.

23 boxes (34.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768
Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center

Types of material

  • Videotapes

Chametzky, Jules

Jules Chametzky Papers, 1947-2006.

15 boxes (22.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 003

Jules Chametzky is a professor of English, emeritus, at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, and the founder (1958) and co-editor of The Massachusetts Review. Born May 24, 1928, in Brooklyn, NY, Chametzky attended Brooklyn College (B.A., 1950) and the University of Minnesota (M.A. 1952; PhD, 1958). During his noteworthy career, he taught at the University of Minnesota, Boston University, Yale University, the Free University of Berlin, and UMass Amherst (1959-present). A specialist in Jewish American literary history, Chametzky was twice a Fullbright Professor, and he has contributed his time to the Modern Language Association of America, the American Association of University Professors, the American Studies Association, and the Coordinating Council of Literary Magazines (Secretary of the Executive Committee, 1967-1972). His many publications include The Fiction of Abraham Cahan, Our Decentralized Literature: Cultural Mediations in Selected Jewish and Southern Writers, and The Rise of David Levinsky.

The Chametzky Papers document Chametzky’s career as an educator, advocate, and academic pioneer. Included in the collection are professional correspondence, notes compiled for research and teaching, committee and meeting notes, travel documents and memorabilia, and a series of materials relating to the founding of The Massachusetts Review and the Institute for Advanced Study in the Humanities at the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English

Contributors

  • Chametzky, Jules

Children’s Aid and Family Services of Hampshire County Inc.

Children's Aid and Family Service Records, 1910-ca. 2001.

10 boxes (8 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 008

Agency providing traditional child and family service and extensive mental health services that worked closely with the SPCC, was a member in the Child Welfare League of America, and was the Northampton representative for the National Association of Travelers Aid Societies. Includes 10 versions of the constitution, typed personal recollections from the 25th anniversary, annual reports, minutes, and the correspondence of President Miriam Chrisman (1952-1957). Of special note, Mrs. Calvin Coolidge was the Chair of the Home Finding Committee of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children which helped to found the CAFS.

Subjects

  • Child mental health services--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Child welfare--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Children--Institutional care--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Coolidge, Grace Goodhue, 1879-1957
  • Floods--Massachusetts
  • Foster home care--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Franklin County (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Hampshire County (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Homeless children--Massachusetts--Franklin County--History
  • Homeless children--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Hurricanes--Massachusetts
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Intellectual life--History
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Social service--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Voluntarism--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Children's Aid Association (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Children's Aid and Family Service of Hampshire County (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Children's Home Association (Franklin County, Mass. and Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Chrisman, Miriam Usher
  • Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Home Finding Committee

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Clarke School for the Deaf

Clarke School for the Deaf Records, ca.1867-2010.

130 boxes (195 linear feet linear feet).
Call no.: MS 742

With a $50,000 grant from the philanthropist John Clarke, Gardiner Green Hubbard founded the Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes in 1867, a school predicated on the importance of acquiring oral skills for children with hearing loss. Opened in Northampton, Mass., under the direction of Harriet B. Rogers, Clarke differed philosophically from schools such as the American School for the Deaf where sign language was used for instruction, stressing speech-reading and speech as the primary methods of communication. With notable supporters such as Alexander Graham Bell, Clarence W. Barron, and Calvin Coolidge and his wife Grace (a former teacher), the school became a pioneer in training teachers in auditory and oral methods and in recognizing the importance of early intervention and mainstreaming children into neighborhood schools. Working in partnership with Smith College, Clarke began offering a master’s degree in Education of the Deaf in 1962. Known as the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech since 2010, the school has opened additional campuses in Boston (1995), Jacksonville (1996), New York (1999), and Philadelphia (2001).

The records of the Clarke School offer rich documentation of the history of oral deaf education in the United States and insight into the experience of deafness in America. The collection includes extensive correspondence of school administrators and teachers, organizational materials, records of the school’s programs, and an essentially complete run of the school’s annual reports and other publications. An extensive set of genealogical and genetic records generated by the research staff at the school is restricted for 75 years from the date of creation.

Subjects

  • Deaf--Education
  • Deafness--Genetic aspects
  • Teachers of the deaf

Contributors

  • Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf
  • Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922
  • Coolidge, Grace Goodhue, 1879-1957

Types of material

  • Minutes (Administrative records)
  • Photographs

Cleary, Vincent J.

Vincent J. Cleary Papers, 1962-2007.

5 boxes (2.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 123

Vincent J. Cleary is a retired Professor of Classics at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, where he taught until 1997. With a particular interest in Latin poetry, Cleary is both a journalist and writer. Most of his writings reflect his love for the Pioneer Valley; Cleary was most commonly published in the Hampshire Gazette, although he also submitted articles to larger magazines and newspapers.

The Cleary Papers are comprised of articles that Cleary wrote for magazines and newspapers such as Hampshire Life, and narratives relating to the town of Amherst for his book Amherst, Massachusetts 01002: One of the Best Small Towns in America. A bound copy of the book is included with the collection, as well as narratives and Cleary’s research materials. The collection contains complete newspapers and magazines and copies of Cleary’s articles (his earlier work is centered around Virgil’s The Aeneid). Also included among the papers are unpublished writings and an array of VHS and cassette tapes with copies of his lectures and class presentations.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students

Contributors

  • Cleary, Vincent J

Colburn, Paul

Part of: Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Paul and Olive Colburn Collection, 1894-2001.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 860
Jonathan Dow marker, Eastern Cemetery, Portland, Me.
Jonathan Dow marker, Eastern Cemetery, Portland, Me.

Husband and wife Paul Francis and Olive (“Tommie” Fox) Colburn were active members of the Association for Gravestone Studies from the 1980s. Natives of Lowell, Mass., and long-time residents of Berwick, Me., the Colburns shared an interest in New England gravestones and marker symbolism, with Tommie enjoying a particular specialty in metal-based markers.

The Colburn collection represents a cross-section of the couple’s work documenting and lecturing about New England grave markers and marker symbolism as well as Victorian funerary practice. Of note are a small number of items reflecting Victorian mourning culture, including images of funeral wreaths and arrangements, three mourning handkerchiefs, and a funeral card.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Connecticut
  • Sepulchral monuments--Maine
  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts
  • Sepulchral monuments--New Hampshire
  • Sepulchral monuments--New York
  • Sepulchral monuments--Rhode Island
  • Sepulchral monuments--Vermont

Contributors

  • Colburn, Olive

Types of material

  • Handkerchiefs
  • Photographs

Collection policy

Frank Waugh's doves
Garden (white fan tailed doves in bird bath) by Frank Waugh, ca.1920

“… there must come vast social change in the United States; a change not violent, but by the will of the people certain and inexorable; carried out ‘with malice toward none but charity for all'; with meticulous justice to the rich and complete sympathy for the poor, the sick and the ignorant; with freedom and democracy for America, and on earth Peace, Good Will toward men.”

W.E.B. Du Bois, Chicago, June 29, 1951

In pursuit of our mission, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects materials of enduring historical and cultural value relating to four major thematic areas: the history and experience of social change in America; the histories and cultures of New England with an emphasis on Massachusetts; innovation and entrepreneurship; and the broad community associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Our collections are highly integrated and span all formats, including personal papers and organizational records, books and periodicals, maps, photographs, audio and video recordings, and digital materials of all kinds.

While not comprehensive, the following includes a brief synopsis of some of the primary focal points for SCUA’s collections:

Our approach to collecting

Echoing the philosophy of W.E.B. Du Bois, SCUA collects original materials that document the histories and experiences of social change in America and the organizational, intellectual, and individual ties that unite disparate struggles for social justice, human dignity, and equality. Our decision to adopt social change as a collecting focus emerged from considering one of Du Bois’s great insights: that the most fundamental issues in social justice are so deeply interconnected that no movement — and no solution to social ills — can succeed in isolation. Rather than focus on individual movements, we therefore focus on the connections between and among movements and the flow of people, organizations, and ideas, all in the hope of better representing the true histories of social engagement in America and laying the foundation for a deeper understanding of the experience of social change.

A related feature of SCUA’s approach to collecting is our commitment to documenting “whole lives and whole communities.” Rather than focus just on a person’s “significant” actions or ideas, our goal is to represent the person’s entire life in all its complexity: the person’s background, the events themselves, and the aftermath, as well as the range of colleagues and organizations engaged. Our goal is not to highlight simply the great achievements and great people, but to reveal the broad underpinnings of influences, interests, and organizations that shaped them and the communities in which they operated.

Social change

Emphasizing the cross-fertilization between social movements and centers of activist energy, SCUA collects materials from individuals and organizations involved in the struggles for peace and non-violence, social and racial justice, economic justice, agricultural reform, environmentalism, sustainability, alternative energy, organized labor, gay rights, disability rights, spiritual activism, antinuclear activism, and intentional communities. Our collections branch out to include anti-fluoridation activism, campaigns for voting rights and clean elections, community and charitable organizations, and the history of revolutionary-era Europe (1789-1848).

  • African and African American history and culture: The history of race and ethnicity in America, with particular emphasis on the struggle for racial equality and social justice.
  • Agriculture, horticulture, botany: Including agricultural science and practice, horticulture, animal husbandry, natural history, organic farming, sustainable living, and heritage breeds.
  • Antinuclear movement: SCUA holds numerous collections documenting grassroots opposition to nuclear power and nuclear weaponry.
  • Arts management and arts administration:
    In partnership with the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts, and several other arts agencies, SCUA documents the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state and national arts agencies, we will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.
  • Cold War Culture: The culture of the Cold War, with an emphasis upon East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. Among other areas, SCUA has a strong interest in the Solidarity movement and in partnership with the DEFA Film Library, in East German cinema and graphic arts.
  • Disability: Organizational records and collections of personal papers documenting the history of disability and disability rights in the United States.
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender issues: Materials relating to the history and experience of the LGBTQ community and liberation struggles.
  • Labor, work, and industry: Organized labor, industrialization, manufacturing, business history, and the experience and culture of labor and working people.
  • Peace: Materials relating to the peace and antiwar movements and non-violence, with an emphasis on New England.
Innovation and entrepreneurship

SCUA collects materials that document innovative and entrepreneurial activities and particularly social entrepreneurship. Representative collections in SCUA include the papers of Mark H. McCormack (a pioneer in sport and entertainment marketing), Carl C. Harris (inventor and President of Rodney Hunt Co.), and numerous collections that document our region’s distinctive history of innovation in manufacturing and technology.

New England history and culture

The social, political, cultural, intellectual, literary, and economic life, with an emphasis upon western New England. The department houses thousands of books on New England cookery, with a particular emphasis on charitable and community cookbooks and cookbooks and ephemera published by corporations and the food industry.

  • Cookery and culinary history
    SCUA has thousands of cookbooks and other materials on New England regional cuisine, including community and charitable cookbooks, commercial cookbooks by New England authors, corporate cookbooks, and culinary ephemera.
  • Literature and the arts
    Emphasizing poets and writers, playwrights, and the performing arts in New England.
  • Politics and political culture
    SCUA has rich collections documenting the history and politics of the Commonwealth, including the papers of Congressmen Silvio O. Conte and John Olver, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, and State Representative John Clark; and the records of the Hampshire Council of Governments and several individual towns.
University Archives interests

Serving as the memory of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University Archives collects, preserves, and makes available official and non-official records documenting the people, policies, programs, facilities, and activities of the campus community, including its administration, departments and programs, faculty, and staff. The Archives avidly collects materials that reflect the lives and experiences of its students and alumni and that reflect our history as one of the Commonwealth’s two land grant institutions.

Other areas

SCUA has developed depth in a handful of other collecting areas, including:

  • American Study of Japan and Asia
    American relations with Japan from the Meiji period to the present, and connections with China and other Asian countries.
  • Protistology
    Records of the scholarly study of the protista (protozoans).

Concordance for the Archives, O

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

O

OAPA
see Office of Academic Planning and Assessment (OAPA) RG-4/3/6
Obituaries, Biographies (Alumni)
RG-50/00/2
see also Health Services–Obituaries (Student) RG-30/15
Occasional Papers Series (International Area Studies)
see Asian Studies Program and Committee RG-25/A8/00
Latin American Studies Program and Committee RG-25/L4/00
Near Eastern Studies Program and Committee RG-25/N4/00
Soviet & East European Studies Program and Committee RG-25/S75/00
Western European Studies Program and Committee RG-25/W3/00
Occupational Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/17/2
Ocean Engineering Program
RG-25/O2
OCHO
see Off Campus Housing Office (OCHO) RG-45/18
OCIS
see Office of Computing & Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- ) RG-6/5/1
Off Campus Housing Office (OCHO)
RG-45/18
Office for Cooperative Education
see Cooperative Education, Office for RG-11/31/1
Office of Academic Planning and Assessment (OAPA)
RG-4/3/6
Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS)
RG-4/3/2
see also V.C. for A. and F. RG-35/1 (records held in RG-4/2-3)
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3.
Office of Computing and Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- )
RG-6/5/1
Office of Economic Development (OED)
RG-4/15
see also Office of Industrial Relations and Regional Development (1987- ) RG-4/10
Office of Grant and Contract Administration
RG-4/4
Office of Human Relations
see Human Relations, Office of RG-4/6
Office of Industrial Relations and Regional Development (1987- )
RG-4/10
see also Office of Economic Development (OED) RG-4/15
Office of Information Technologies (OIT)
see Office of Computing and Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- ) RG-6/5/1
Office of Internships
see Internships, Office of (University Internship Program) RG-11/6
Office of Institutional Research (OIR)
RG-4/3/5
see also Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4.
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP)
RG-4/3/4
see also Executive V.C. and Provost RG-6/1 (records held in RG-4/3/4)
Associate V.C. for Academic Affairs RG-30/1 (records held in RG-4/3/4)
Office of Institutional Studies (OIS) (1960-1969)
RG-4/3/1
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB)
RG-4/3/3
see also Budget Office RG-35/20
Budget Documents RG-4/2
Office of Institution Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Office of Public Information (OPI)
RG-5/3
see also Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
Office of Residential Resource Management (1976- )
RG-30/21/1
see also Residential Academic Programs RG-35/14
Housing Administration RG-32/12
Office of Solid Waste Management (OSWM)
RG-36/10
see also Residential Recycling Program RG- 45/40/R6
Office of Space Management (OSM)
RG-4/14
Office of Teaching Evaluation and Improvement
see Institutional Resources and Improvement, Center for (1973) RG-6/18
Office of the Learning Disabilities Coordinator
see Counseling and Academic Development Center (CADC) (1987) RG-11/8
Office to Coordinate Energy Research and Education
RG-10/5
Official University Committees (Faculty and Staff)
RG-40/2
Official University Faculty/Staff Committees, Other
RG-40/2/A6-Z9
Officials of the University (Photographs)
RG-110
OIP
see Office of Institutional Research (OIP) RG-4/3/5
OIRP
see
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
OIT (Office of Information Technologies)
see Office of Computing and Information Systems RG-6/5/1
Older Students
see Counseling Assistance for Older Students (CAOS) RG-45/40/C4
Olericulture Department
see Plant and Soil Sciences RG-25/P4
Olmsted Drive (Physical Plant) (1939)
RG-36/50/O6
Omega Psi Phi (1985- )
RG-45/90/O6
Ombuds Office (1969- )
RG-4/8
see also Ombudsman (Faculty Senate, 1968- ) RG-40/2/A3
Ombudsman Selection Committee (1975-1976) RG-40/2/O4
Multicultural Conflict Resolution Team (1993- ) RG-4/8/1
Ombudsman Committee (Faculty Senate, 1968-1979)
RG-40/2/A3
see also Ombuds Office (1969- ) RG-4/8
Ombudsman Selection (Official University Committee) (1975-1976)
RG-40/2/O4
see also Ombudsman (Faculty Senate, 1968-1974) RG-40/2/A3
Omicron Delta Epsilon
RG-45/60/O4
Omicron Nu (Honor Society)
RG-45/60/O4.5
On Campus Alumni Group (1986-1989)
RG-40/3/O5
On the Other Hand
see Academic Affairs Committee (Student Senate) RG-45/7/A2
125th Anniversary
see Anniversary, 125th (1988) RG-1/8
see also University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988) RG-1/208
125th Anniversary Slide Show, UMass (1988)
see UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988) RG-187/1
OPB
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Operations Council
RG-30/1/2
Operetta Guild (Films and Videotapes)
RG-186/3
Operetta Guild/Music Theatre Guild
RG-25/M9.4
see also Theatre (Photographs) RG-140/1
Music (Photographs) RG-140/2
Operetta Guild (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/3
Oral History (1974-1982)
RG-1/207
see also Oral Histories (selected) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project)
History Department RG-25/H5
Oratory, Student
see Speaking Contests, Student Oratory RG-25/C7.3
Orchard Hill (Residential Buildings)
RG-36/102/O7
Orchestra (Music and Dance Department)
RG-25/M9.3
Organization Charts (Issued by President’s Office)
RG-3/00/1
Organization Charts of the University
see Bibliography, Organization Charts RG-1/00/1
see also Operating Budget Summary, 1974-1975, etc. RG-3/4/2
OBIS- Facts & Figures 1967, Factbook-1977 RG-4/2
Standard Practice Instruction, 1954, p.2 RG-3/4/1
Proposed Spring 1970, Mass. Gazette, 5/8/1970, P.B. RG-4/1
Business Manager, 9/1/1967- RG-35/3
Annual Reports, bound vols. 1972-73-75-76 RG-1/00/2
Organizational charts issued by President’s Office RG-3/00/1
Organization of the Research Mission, ad hoc Committee (1998- )
RG-40/2/O7
Organizational and Community Development, Center for (COCD)
see Center for Organizational and Community Development (COCD) RG-13/4/3/3
see also Citizen Involvement Training Project (CITP) RG-7/9
Organizations Not Appointed by an Official Unit of the University, Faculty and Staff Committees
see Faculty and Staff Committees and Organizations not appointed by an official unit of the University RG-40/3
Organizations, Student (Photographs)
see Student Organizations (Photographs) RG-140
OSM
see Office of Space Management RG-4/14
OSWM
see Office of Solid Waste Management (OSWM) RG-36/10
Other Voice, The (1980-1984)
RG-30/26/O8
Out Front (Student Publication) (1975-1977)
RG-45/00/O9
Outing Club (1940- )
RG-45/40/O9.5
Outlook
RG-15/12
Outreach (1986-1988)
RG-3/8
Outreach Mobile Unit
RG-30/13
Outreach Programs, Center for (1972-1981)
RG-6/4/8
Outreach, University, Vice Provost for
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach RG-16/1
Outreach, Vice Chancellor for University
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- ) RG-16/1
Overseas Programs & Exchanges, Committee on
see Committee on Overseas Programs & Exchanges (COPE) RG-40/2/C5
Oversize Materials
RG-177 thru RG-184
Oversize Photos
RG-175
Oxford, UMass Summer School at
see English Department–Oxford, UMass Summer School at RG-25/E3/3
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