Results for: “Environmental justice” (170 collections)SCUA

Concordance for the Archives, W

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W

WAGES
see Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) RG-45/40/W6
Wail, Summer School
see Summer School Wail RG-45/00/S10
Walden Learning Center
see Psychology Department RG-25/P8/3
Waltham Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Field Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Suburban Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Ward Commission
see Massachusetts Commission on Corruption (Ward Commission) RG-36/23
Wareham Agricultural Engineering Laboratory
see Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Wareham Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory
see Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Washington Irving Literary Society (1867-1892)
RG-45/40/W3
see also Literary Society (1953-1959) RG-40/3/L4
Waste Prevention, National Environmental Technology for
see National Environmental Technology for Waste Prevention Institute (NETI) RG-25/N3
Water Color Paintings (Memorabilia, general)
RG-183/5
Water Crisis, UMass Amherst (Physical Plant) (1980-1989)
RG-36/50/W3
see also Water Supply (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/W4
Water Polo
see Sports, Men’s Water Polo (1992) RG-18/2
Sports, Women’s Water Polo (1995- ) RG-18/2
Water Resources Research Center (WRRC)
RG-25/W2
Water Resources Research Center–Annual Reports (1968, 1970- )
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Completion Reports (1969-1977)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Newsletter (1983-1993)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Publications
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Special Reports
RG-25/W2/00
Water Supply (Physical Plant)
RG-36/50/W4
see also Water Crisis (1980-1989) RG-36/50/W3
Waugh Arboretum (Physical Plant) (1944)
RG-36/104/W3
Waugh Memorial Garden Committee (Faculty Senate, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of RG-25/A4
W. E. B. Du Bois Library
see Library Buildings-Tower (University Library/W.E.B. Du Bois Library) (1961- ) RG-8/5/3
W.E.B. Du Bois Petition Coalition (1993-1995)
RG-45/80/W4
Weekly Biff, The (Student Publication) (1910)
RG-45/00/W4
Weekly Bulletin (1971-1985)
see Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
Weekly News, The (Student Publication) (1989)
RG-45/00/W5
Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin (1912-1985)
RG-5/00/3
see also University Bulletin (newsprint format) RG-5/00/6
Campus Chronicle (newspaper)(1985- ) RG-5/00/10
West Campus Design Proposal (1993) (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/W4
Western European Area Studies (Program and Committee)
RG-25/W3
Western Massachusetts Latin American Solidarity Committee
see Latin American Solidarity Committee, Western Massachusetts RG-45/80/L3
WFCR of Note (1991- )
RG-60/8
WFCR Program Guide (1966-1991)
RG-60/8
WFCR Radio Station
RG-60/8
WFCR Weekly Classified Music (1993- )
RG-60/8
Wheel (Student Social Action Group) (1986)
RG-45/80/W3
WIG
see Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5
Wilder Times (Landscape Architecture Department) (1972-1993)
RG-25/L2/00
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative
(College of Food and Natural Resources) RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative–Contributions (1970-1974)
RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (Massachusetts Cooperative)
see Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (1948-1988) RG-15/6
Winter, Alumni Day
see Mid-Winter Alumni Day (1923-1926) RG-40/2/M5
Winter School
see Summer School, Short Courses RG-6/17
WISPP
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/P7
WMUA (FM Radio Station) (1948- )
RG-45/30/W6
WOCH (Orchard Hill Radio Station) (1987- )
RG-45/30/W7
Women, Advisory Council of
see Advisory Council of Women (1921-1964) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
see also Advisory Council of Women (Film, ca. 1927) RG-186/100/1
Women and Minority Groups, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Women and Minority Groups, Associate (1968-1981) RG-6/13
see also Affirmative Action Office (1982- ) RG-4/7
Everywoman’s Center RG-7/2
Women, Dean of
see Dean of Women RG-30/3
see also Dean of Women, Helen Curtis (1902-1993) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5

Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP)
RG-40/5/W5
Women, National Organization for
see National Organization for Women (NOW) (1989- ) RG-45/80/N7
Women, New England Council of Land-Grant University
see New England Council of Land-Grant University Women RG-60/1/1
Women of Color Program (1993-1998) /Women of Color Leadership Network (WOCLN) (1998- )
(Everywoman’s Center ) RG-7/2/2/9
see also Third World Women’s Programmer (1979-1989) RG-7/2/2/5
Women, Status of, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1970- )
RG-40/2/A3
Women, University
see University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) (1985-1989)
RG-45/40/W6
Women’s Caucus and Vietnam Veterans Against the War (1971-1972)
RG-45/80/W5
Women’s Clubs
see Engineering Faculty Women’s Club (Engineering Wives) RG-40/7/3
New Comer’s Club RG-40/7/2
University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Conference, Five-College
see Five-College Women’s Conference, Valley Women’s Studies Journal RG-60/9
Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
see Women’s Equity Project RG-7/2/2/1
Women’s Equity Project (1972-1984)
RG-7/2/2/1
Note: Formerly Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
Women’s Health, Center for Research and Education in
see Center for Research and Education in Women’s Health (CREWH) RG-17/1/2
Women’s Leadership Project (1984-1989)
RG-45/80/W6
Women’s Network, Graduate
see Graduate Women’s Network (1994- ) RG-45/40/G7
Women’s News in the Collegian (Official University Committee) (1978)
RG-40/2/W6
Women’s Physical Education (WOPE)
see Physical Education, Women’s RG-25/P3.2
Women’s Program Development
RG-7/8
Women’s Programmer, Third World
see Third World Women’s Programmer RG-7/2/2/5
Women’s Rights, Progressive Organization of
see Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989- ) RG-45/80/P7
Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA)
RG-45/4
see also Women’s Student Government Association Handbooks for Women (1925-1941) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women’s Studies Newsletter (1976- ) RG-25/W5/00

Women’s Studies Program
RG-25/W5
Wood Science and Technology
RG-25/W7
WOPE Department
see Physical Education, Women’s Department (WOPE) RG-25/P3.2
Worcester Medical School
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
Wrestling
see Sports, Men’s Wrestling (1965, 1970-1971) RG-18/2
Writing Program
RG-25/E3/1
see also University Writing Program RG-7/11
Writing Program, ad hoc Committee for (Faculty Senate, 1982- )
RG-40/2/A3
WRRC
see Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) (1970- ) RG-25/W2
WSGA
see Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) RG-45/4
WSUR (Southwest Radio Station) (1998)
RG-45/30/W8
WSYL (Sylvan Radio Station) (1986)
RG-45/30/W9

Cushing, Timothy

Timothy Cushing Account Book, 1764-1845 (Bulk: 1781-1806).

2 vols. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 485 bd

A carpenter by trade and a farmer, Timothy Cushing lived in Cohasset, Massachusetts, throughout most of his adult life. Born on Feb 2, 1738, the eighth child of Samuel Cushing, a selectman and Justice of the Peace from the second district in Hingham (now Cohasset), Cushing married Desire Jenkins (b. 1745) on June 4, 1765, and raised a considerable family of eleven children. During the Revolutionary War, he served for a brief period in companies raised in Cohasset, but otherwise remained at home, at work, until his death on December 26, 1806.

Cushing’s accounts offer a fine record of the activities of a workaday carpenter during the first decades of the early American republic, reflecting both his remarkable industry and the flexibility with which he approached earning a living. The work undertaken by Cushing centers on two areas of activity — carpentry and farm work — but within those areas, the range of activities is quite broad. As a carpenter, Cushing set glass in windows, hung shutters, made coffins, hog troughs, and window seats; he worked on horse carts and sleds, barn doors, pulled down houses and framed them, made “a Little chair” and a table, painted sashes, hewed timber, made shingles, and worked on a dam. As a farm worker, he was regularly called upon to butcher calves and bullocks, to garden, mow hay, plow, make cider, and perform many other tasks, including making goose quill pens. The crops he records reflect the near-coastal setting: primarily flax, carrots, turnips, corn, and potatoes, with references throughout to cattle and sheep. During some periods, Cushing records selling fresh fish, including haddock and eels.

Subjects

  • Agricultural laborers--Massachusetts--Cohasset--18th century
  • Carpenters--Massachusetts--Cohasset--18th century
  • Cohasset (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Cohasset (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century

Contributors

  • Cushing, Isaac, 1813-1891
  • Cushing, Timothy, 1738-1806

Types of material

  • Account books

Democratic Socialist Conference

Democratic Socialist Conference Collection, 1984-1991.

2 boxes (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 325

Includes transcripts of papers delivered at conferences (1985-1990) on democratic socialism, and correspondence (1984-1991) between Stephen Siteman, former Executive Secretary of the Socialist Party of America, and Frank Zeidler, former Mayor of Milwaukee, Socialist Party candidate for President of the United States, and national chairperson of the Socialist Party USA.

Subjects

  • Socialism--Africa
  • Socialist Party of the United States of America
  • United States--Politics and government--1981-1989
  • United States--Politics and government--1989-1993

Contributors

  • Siteman, Stephen
  • Zeidler, Frank P

Du Bois Library Fellowships

du bois

The Department of Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library offers short-term residential fellowships to assist younger scholars in conducting research in its collections. Among the approximately 15,000 linear feet of manuscripts held by SCUA are many valuable collections for the study of social change in the United States, including the papers of the most important exponent of the politics and culture of the twentieth century, W.E.B. Du Bois. In addition, the University Library houses over three million volumes and a rich suite of electronic resources to support advanced research in the humanities. Comprehensive, searchable guides and finding aids to SCUA’s collections are available on this website.

View past Du Bois Fellows

Application information

Eligibility: Full time graduate students, faculty, or independent scholars (with a PhD), with a preference for persons early in their career. Fellows may come from any field and any perspective, and they may work on any topic, but their research should explore the major themes that characterize Du Bois’s scholarship and activism, including the history and meaning of racial, social, and economic justice; the problems of democracy and political inclusion; the role of capitalism in world affairs; and the global influence of African cultures. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.
Award & expectations: Fellows will receive $2,500 to defray expenses. Fellows are required to spend four consecutive weeks in residence at SCUA, during which time they will work with our collections. At the end of their residency, fellows will be asked to deliver a public talk on their research. Fellows may schedule their residency at any time between July in the year of award through the following April.
Selection criteria: Fellows will be selected on a competitive basis from applicants interested in conducting original research in the Du Bois Papers and other SCUA collections. The criteria for selection will include: 1) potential of the proposal to contribute to scholarship, 2) fit with Du Boisian themes, 3) the need for use of SCUA collections, and 4) the letter of support. The application will consist of a brief (up to 3 pages) description of the research project, a curriculum vita, and a letter of support.
Deadline for submission: Applications must be received by March 7, 2014 (please note that we have extended the deadline from Feb. 14 to Mar. 7).
How to submit: Applications should be submitted electronically to askanarc [at] library.umass.edu with “Du Bois application” and your name in the subject line. Letters of recommendation should be sent separately to the same address.

InformationDownload the application form (rtf file).

Duesing, Bill

Bill Duesing Politics of Food Collection, 1997-1998.

14 items (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 760

A pioneer in organic agriculture in New England, Bill Duesing has been as an environmental educator, writer, artist, and lecturer over for four decades. After graduating from Yale University (1964), Duesing worked as a Cooperative Extension agent before turning to organic principles in the early 1970s. Emphasizing sustainability and greater local food sufficiency, he has been instrumental in developing organic standards for gardening and land care and he has served as both founding president and later executive director of the Northeast Organic Farming Association Connecticut and president of the NOFA Interstate Council. During the 1990s, Duesing produced two radio shows, “Living on the Earth” (WSHU) and “The Politics of Food” (WPKN), and he is author of Living on the Earth: Eclectic Essays for a Sustainable and Joyful Future (1993).

The Duesing collection consists of fourteen recordings of The Politics of Food radio program, which was broadcast monthly over WPKN (89.5 FM) in Bridgeport in 1997-1998. Each half hour segment included news, a fifteen minute interview, recipes, and tips, with interviewees including Mel Bristol, Jac Smit, Vincent Kay, John Wargo, Hugh Joseph, Joseph Kiefer, Julie Rawson, Michael Sligh, Kathy Lawrence, Lee Warren, and Elizabeth Henderson.

Subjects

  • Cookery, Health aspects
  • Natural foods--Certification
  • Organic farming
  • Organic farming--Law and legislation
  • Politics of food
  • Sustainable agriculture

Contributors

  • Henderson, Elizabeth, 1943-
  • Rawson, Julie

Types of material

  • Audiotapes

Field, William Franklin, 1922-

William F. Field Papers, 1948-1986.

27 (13.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 30/2 F5
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971

The University’s first Dean of Students, William F. Field held the post from 1961 until his retirement in 1988. The 27 years Field was Dean of Students was a critical time of growth and unrest, as the University’s student population more than tripled in size and the nation-wide movements for civil rights and against the Vietnam War were reflected through student activism and protest on the University’s campus. Responsible for ending student curfews and overseeing all dorms becoming co-ed, Field also worked with minority students and faculty to support the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

The William F. Field Papers document Field’s career as an administrator at the University of Massachusetts and specifically his role as Dean of Students from 1961-1988. The correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, and other official printed and manuscript documents are a rich resource for one of the most important and volatile eras in the University’s history. Of particular interest are extensive files on student protests and activism in the late 1960s and early 1970s and the growing diversity of the campus student population, flourishing of the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B. Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

Subjects

  • African American college students--Massachusetts
  • Field, William Franklin, 1922-
  • Race relations--United States
  • Universities and colleges--United States--Administration
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean of Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Afro-American Studies
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--United States

Types of material

  • Correspondence
  • Memorandums

Gershuny, Grace

Grace Gershuny Papers, 1975-1997.

2 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 793
Soul of Soil
Soul of Soil

An organizer, consultant, and educator in the alternative agriculture movement, Grace Gershuny has been active in the field since the 1970s when she worked for the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA), developing its first organic certification program. As a leader in the movement, Gershuny helped to establish both the Organic Trade Association and the Organic Farmer: The Digest of Sustainable Agriculture. Today she continues to write and teach on the subject, serving as a faculty member at a number of colleges, most recently Green Mountain College.

The collection consists chiefly of printed material from a run of the Organic Farmer to Appropriate Technology Transfer for Rural Areas (ATTRA) publications and organizational newsletters, such as the Rural Education Center. Amongst these publications are a few small but significant groups of materials including notes from Gershuny’s role as the NOFA VT coordinator in 1979 and her drafts and notes for the second editions of The Soul of Soil.

Subjects

  • Farming--United States
  • Northeast Organic Farming Association
  • Organic farmers
  • Organic farming

Contributors

  • Gershuny, Grace

Green Mountain Post Films

Green Mountain Post Films Records, 1968-ca.1985.

10 boxes (13 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 516

Co-founded by Charles Light and Daniel Keller, Green Mountain Post Films has produced and distributed films for more than twenty-five years. Their first documentary film released in 1975, Lovejoy’s Nuclear War, was one of the first films to question the nuclear energy policy of the United States. Since then GMP Films has continued to produce movies that explore social issues, and their films have been used as educational and organizational tools for activists working on peace, veteran, nuclear, environmental and other related issues.

The collection contains very little that documents the activities of GMP Films, chiefly research files, correspondence, and proposals relating to film projects either produced or under consideration. The bulk of the collection consists of alternative press publications from the 1960s-1970s.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Nuclear energy--Law and legislation--New England
  • Social action--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Green Mountain Post Films

Gyorgy, Anna

Anna Gyorgy Papers, 1974-1988..

6 boxes (6.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 631
No Nukes
No Nukes

As a member of the Montague Farm community, Anna Gyorgy became a leader in the movement against nuclear energy. In 1974, she helped organize the Alternative Energy Alliance in Montague, Mass., and two years later, she was part of the coalition that founded the Clamshell Alliance. An author, ecofeminist, and peace activist, she has lived In Ireland, West Africa, and Germany since 1985 and remains deeply involved in international movements for justice and peace.

Tightly focused on Anna Gyorgy’s activism from the mid-1970s through late 1980s, the collection contains important documentation on the early antinuclear movement in western Massachusetts with some material on the international movement in the 1980s. In addition to a small run of correspondence, the collection includes writings, news clippings, publications, and ephemera relating to antinuclear activism during the 1970s and 1980s and to other related causes, including the Rainbow Coalition and Jesse Jackson’s run for the presidency in 1984. The balance of the Gyorgy Papers are housed at Smith College.

Subjects

  • Alternative Energy Coalition
  • Antinuclear movement
  • Clamshell Alliance

Contributors

  • Gyorgy, Anna

Types of material

  • Photographs

Hampshire Council of Governments

Hampshire Council of Governments Records, 1677-1974.

90 volumes, 17 boxes (80 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 704
Title page, Volume 1 (1671)
Title page, Volume 1 (1671)

The Hampshire Council of Governments is a voluntary association of cities and towns and the successor to the former government of Hampshire County, Massachusetts, that was abolished in 1999. A body politic and corporate, its charter ratified by Massachusetts General Law 34B, S20(b), the Council oversees roadways, the electricity supply, building inspection, tobacco control, cooperative purchasing, and other services for member communities.

The Hampshire Council collection contains a dense record of county-level governance in western Massachusetts from the colonial period through the mid-twentieth century with extensive documentation of the actions of the County Commissioners, and before them the Court of Common Pleas and Court of General Sessions. Rich in documenting the development of the transportation infrastructure of western Massachusetts, the collection offers detailed information associated with the planning and construction of highways, canals, ferries, and railroads, but the early records offer a broad perspective on the evolution of the legal and cultural environment, touching on issues from disorderly conduct (e.g., fornication, Sabbath breaking) to the settlement of estates, local governance, public works, and politics.

Subjects

  • Bridges--Massachusetts--Hampshire Count
  • Dams--Massachusetts--Hampshire Count
  • Hampshire County (Mass.)--History
  • Hampshire County (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Indians of North America--Massachusetts
  • Northampton (Mass.)--History
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Railroads--Massachusetts
  • Roads--Massachusetts--Hampshire County
  • Taverns (Inns)--Massachusetts--Hampshire County

Contributors

  • Hampshire County (Mass.). County Commissioners
  • Massachusetts. Court of General Sessions of the Peace (Hampshire County)
  • Massachusetts. Inferior Court of Common Pleas (Hampshire County)

Types of material

  • Civil court records
  • Maps
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