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Garside, Kenneth G.

Kenneth G. Garside Papers

5 boxes 2.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 887
Image of

A noted South Shore cranberry grower, Kenneth Greenwood Garside was graduate of Harvard (Chemistry, 1927) and MIT (MS, Gas and Chemical Engineering, 1929). After working for several years in the electric industry, he relocated to Duxbury, Mass., in 1937 to taking over operations of 406 acres of cranberry bog. Over the next twenty-five years as a grower, Garside served as Director of the New England Cranberry Sales Co. and as a board member of the National Cranberry Association, and after dissolving his partnership in the Duxbury Cranberry Company in 1956, he served as acting General Manager of Ocean Spray during the aminotriazole crisis of 1959-1960. Following his retirement from the bogs, Garside taught science in schools in Florida and Maine. He died at Blue Hill, Maine, in 1987.

The Garside Papers contain nearly forty years of letters between the Massachusetts cranberry grower Kenneth G. Garside and his daughter Anne G. Cann. Rich and well-written, these letters reflect Garside’s work and touch on his many interests, from cranberry culture to politics, family, and education. The collection also contains fascinating material

Gift of Anne G. Cann, 2016
  • Cranberry industry--Massachusetts--Duxbury
  • Cann, Anne G.

Gay, Merrick, 1802-1866

Merrick Gay Account Books

1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 242

A successful merchant from Gaysville, Vermont, Merrick Gay (1802-1866) operated a general store in his village for many years, later establishing a woolen factory. Gay served his community variously as postmaster, town clerk, and state senator.

These two daybooks document Gay’s business transactions with local individuals and firms and with the Town of Stockbridge and Narrows School District. The entries record the name of each customer, the method and form of payment (cash and goods), and Gay’s purchases, including labor costs for hauling freight.

  • Barter--Vermont--Gaysville--History--19th century
  • Blanchard, Solomon, b. ca. 1816
  • Books--Prices--Vermont--History--19th century
  • Claremont Manufacturing Company--History
  • Freight and freightage--Rates--Vermont--History--19th century
  • Gaysville (Vt.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Gaysville (Vt.)--Rural conditions--19th century
  • Gaysville Forge Company--History
  • Gaysville Manufacturing Company--History
  • General stores--Vermont--Gaysville
  • Narrows School District--History
  • Stockbridge (Vt.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Waller, Israel
  • Gay, Merrick, 1802-1866
Types of material
  • Account books
  • Daybooks

George Cooley & Company

George Cooley & Co. Ledger

1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 111

Ledger, begun by George Cooley in 1843 to record the accounts of his soapmaking business in the Cabotville section of Chicopee, continued by Titus Chapin, an ardent abolitionist, and Mordecai Cough who managed the business following Cooley’s death (or departure) in 1848. The 1843 date coincides with the coming of many small businesses to Cabotville in connection with the growth of industries there at the time.

Cooley accepted goods, services and cash as payment. The most frequently accepted goods had relatively obvious value to a soap maker: grease and ashes, tallow, pork, scraps and skins, and candles. Some of the services bartered were repairing wagon, shoeing horse, fixing wippletree, making 30 boxes, and covering umbrella. The business sold gallons, bars, and cakes of soap. Mount Holyoke Seminary bought 28 “fancy soaps”. Also listed were shaving soap and hard or hand soap. In addition, sales sometimes included candles, butter, mop handles, molasses, apples and potatoes, squashes, satinet, cheese, cord wood, paint, and rosin. Some of the listings were annotated with regard to the customer’s character: Ashad Bartlett was seen as “bad and poor and fights with his wife”‘ Norris Starkwether was “an honest man”; and Miss L.B. Hunt “eloped with a man”.

  • Chicopee (Mass.)--History
  • Soap trade--Massachusetts
  • George Cooley and Company

Glass Container Association

Glass Container Association Records

1910-1953 Bulk: 1924-1935
13 boxes 7 linear feet
Call no.: MS 289

The Glass Container Association (now the Glass Packaging Institute) was founded in 1919 as a trade association for the North American glass container industry. Throughout its history, the Association was an important voice setting industry standards and educating packing professionals, and they monitored trends and conducted and disseminated research in the use of glass containers. During the 1920s and 1930s, they responded to queries from their membership by carrying out research projects on product-specific issues in using glass containers as well as research into more general concerns relating to the use of glass containers.

This subject file maintained by the Glass Container Association during the 1920s through the mid-1930s, consists of inquiries from manufacturers and food processors about concerns in packing relating to particular products and packing methods. Organized topically, the files contain copies of queries and other correspondence, research data (in some cases) and reports, replies, publications, and occasionally write-ups on products and industry standards.

Gift of Bruce Krasin, 1989
  • Food--Packaging
  • Food--Packaging--Standards
  • Glass container industry--United States
  • Glass containers--Standards
  • Glass Container Association
Types of material
  • Photographs

Goldspinner, Jay

Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection

1 box 1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 909

1977 Spring Equinox cover of WomenSpirit

All social change and cultural movements have their associated resources for the exchange of information, ideas, stories, and art. Particularly in the women’s movement, the effort to create newsletters, journals, and other forms of information dissemination was a proactive step taken to assert women’s stories and to locate the power of the press within women-run communities. These periodicals, both large and small in scale, reveal the ways women connected to each other and to larger spiritual and cultural concepts. Local artist, activist, and feminist Jay Goldspinner was engaged with many of these communities, particularly those characterizing the spiritual elements of the women’s liberation and feminist movements, and collected and saved their periodicals. Her collection includes journals focusing on feminist linguistics, goddess myths and spirituality, Wiccan and witch traditions, progressive politics, and women’s spirituality and community in local and international settings. Each is a unique window into discourses of women’s history, feminist movements, and social change work.

The Jay Goldspinner Periodicals Collection consists of issues of feminist and progressive periodicals, journals, and newsletters from four decades. The titles represented include Always in Season, Goddessing, The Lonesome Node, The People’s Voice of Franklin County, Themis/Thesmophoria, Wicked Word, and an almost complete run, including the two indexes, of the seminal magazine of feminist spirituality, WomenSpirit.

  • Feminism--Periodicals
  • Franklin County (Mass.) --Periodicals
  • Goddess religion--Periodicals
  • Neopaganism--Periodicals
  • Spiritual feminism--Periodicals
  • Wicca--Periodicals
  • Witchcraft--Periodicals
  • Women and spiritualism--Periodicals
  • Women's rights and spiritualism--Periodicals
Types of material
  • Periodicals

Goodwin, Marcellus H.

Marcellus H. Goodwin Scrapbook

1 vol. 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 484 bd
Image of Fashion plate
Fashion plate

In the early 1870s, twenty year-old Marcellus H. Goodwin was listed as a music teacher in city directories for Newburyport, Mass., residing at 32 Federal Street in the home of his father, Abel L. Goodwin. In later years, Marcellus worked as an upholsterer, but died died prematurely in 1883.

The Goodwin scrapbook is a typical production of the period in which the pages in a bound volume (in this case containing work records from 1841) are pasted over with newsclippings, mostly from the early 1870s. Goodwin favored poetry, aphorisms, and brief tales — sometimes humorous, but other times including curious facts — which, as far as can be discerned, were clipped from the Boston Courier and Newburyport Herald. Goodwin also pasted in three colorful fashion plates, a small series of illustrations of buildings at the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition, and an original poem, “A short sermon.”

  • Newburyport (Mass.)--History--19th century
Types of material
  • Scrapbooks

Gould, Thomas

Thomas Gould, A list of the names of publick Friends, who have visited New England

1 vol. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 903 bd

Born in Middletown, R.I., on May 25, 1730, Thomas Gould was part of an extended Quaker family in Newport County and descendant of one of the first Quaker converts in Rhode Island. Enjoying success as a “mechanic” and farmer, according to Representative Men and Old Families of Rhode Island (1908), he married Alice Chase of Portsmouth in March 1757 and raised a large family of five boys and five girls. Gould died on May 3, 1795.

This slender volume includes a chronological record visits to New England by Public Friends: Quakers who were considered to have a special gift in prayer or public speaking and who often traveled widely to minister.

  • Quakers--New England
Types of material
  • Booklets

Granite Cutters International Association of America. Tool Sharpeners Local 1

GCIAA Tool Sharpeners Local 1 Records

0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 005

The Tool Sharpeners Local 1 of Granite Cutters International Association of America was established in Quincy, Mass., in 1896. The local represented the interests of one of the skilled trades within the Grant Cutters, which claimed for itself “jurisdiction over cutting, carving, dressing, sawing, and setting all granite and hard stone on which granite cutters tools are used,” and further claiming that “no other other trade, craft or calling has any right or jurisdiction over” the these activities.

The minutebooks contain records of membership meetings of the Toolsharpeners Local 1 of the Granite Cutters’ International Association. Spartan documents, these include notice of the election of officers, summaries of business, and occasional brief notes on grievances, communications with other locals, and new and departing members.

  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Stone-cutters--Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Granite Cutters' International Association of America
Types of material
  • Minute books

Graphic Communications International Union. Local 48B

GCIU Local 48B Records

3 boxes 1.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 059

Local of the Graphic Communications International Union that represented over 1000 bindery workers in the Holyoke, Massachusetts area. Records include detailed minutes, shop reports, committee reports, reports of delegates sent to the Holyoke Central Labor Union and national conventions, copies of agreements, notes on contract negotiations, copies of three newsletters, and subject files that document activities as well as the emergence of factionalism within the union.

  • Carrying on
  • Collective bargaining--Paper industry--Massachusetts --Holyoke--History--Sources
  • Holyoke (Mass.)--Economic conditions--Sources
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • National Blank Book Co.--History
  • Old unionist
  • Paper industry workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts--Holyoke
  • Graphic Arts International Union. Local 48B
  • International Brotherhood of Bookbinders. Local 48
Types of material
  • Newsletters

Gray Panthers of the Pioneer Valley

Gray Panthers of the Pioneer Valley Records

12 boxes 7 linear feet
Call no.: MS 468

Amherst, Massachusetts, chapter of the national Gray Panther organization that sponsored the weekly Amherst Vigil for Peace and Justice, tackled such issues as fair and affordable housing for people of all ages, nursing home reform, Social Security policy, universal health care, safe-sex, and age discrimination, and also worked to improve the everyday life of senior citizens and the community at large, often collaborating with other local organizations to address world peace, environmental concerns, improved child care, educational opportunities, and handicapped accessibility.

Records include charter, by-laws, histories and mission statements, meeting agendas and minutes, correspondence, financial reports, fund raising materials, membership lists, membership questionnaire, newsletters, press releases, leaflets, clippings, a scrapbook, T-shirts, and program files, that document the founding and activities of the Gray Panthers of the Pioneer Valley.

  • Older people--Massachusetts
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts
  • Social justice--Massachusetts
  • Gray Panthers of the Pioneer Valley
  • Holt, Margaret