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Mayo, Anna

Anna Mayo Papers
1970-2015
2 boxes (2 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 945
Image of John Gofman and Anna Mayo, 1970s<br />Photo by Lionel Delevingne
John Gofman and Anna Mayo, 1970s
Photo by Lionel Delevingne

Beginning in 1969, the New York-based journalist Anna Mayo wrote a column, “Geiger Counter,” for the Village Voice, that became a sounding board for the antinuclear movement of the 1970s. With roots in community resistance to Columbia University’s plans to install a Triga-type reactor in the middle of New York City, Mayo covered the “nuclear horror stories that the New York Times neglected,” as she later wrote, including Three Mile Island and Chernobyl. A change in ownership at the Voice and ongoing pressure from the nuclear industry led to her being forced out in 1989, although it did not end her commitment to the cause. She contributed to publications such as the Texas Observer, Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, Kursbach, and Liberation (Paris) until the time of her death in March 2016.

The Mayo Papers are an assemblage of writing, research notes, and and some correspondence documenting Anna Mayo’s career as an antinculear journalist. The files include information on major figures in the antinuclear movement, including John Gofman and Ernest Sternglass, and include a special emphasis on the accident at Three Mile Island.

Gift of Meg Mayo, 2016
Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--New York (State)
  • Three Mile Island Nuclear Power Plant (Pa.)

McCarthy, Harold T.

Harold T. McCarthy Papers
1958-1989
4 boxes (2 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 028

Author, English professor, and University of Massachusetts alumnus (class of 1941) Harold T. McCarthy taught at the University of Massachusetts from 1959 and into his retirement in the late 1980s. In addition to his books on Henry James (1968) and the expatriate perspective on the idea of America (1972), he wrote fiction and poetry as well as critical articles on Nathaniel Hawthorne, Mark Twain, Herman Melville, and Richard Wright.

The McCarthy collection includes correspondence, typescript manuscripts, poems, travel journals, and class materials including syllabi and lecture notes.

Subjects
  • American literature--Study and teaching (Higher)--United States
  • Amherst (Mass.)--Intellectual life--20th century
  • College teachers--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • McCarthy, Harold T. Expatriate perspective
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Alumni and alumnae
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
  • McCarthy, Harold T
Types of material
  • Diaries
  • Lecture notes
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Men’s Resource Center for Change

Men's Resource Center Records
ca. 1982-2007
6 boxes (7.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 813

In 1982, Steven Botkin, who had done his doctoral work in the social justice program at UMass Amherst’s School of Education, co-founded the Men’s Resource Connection (MRC) in Amherst, Mass., to promote healthy ideas of masculinity and male leadership by challenging harmful stereotypes involving violence, sexism, and oppression and creating a local network of men as well as of men and women. In 1983 MRC started a newsletter, Valley Men, which became the magazine Voice Male, with a circulation of 10,000. Incorporated as a nonprofit in 1988, MRC developed programs to serve and educate men, with a focus on violence and domestic violence in particular, notably Men Overcoming Violence (MOVE), later called Moving Forward. In 1993 the MRC changed its name to the Men’s Resource Center of Western Massachusetts, and by 2005 it was known as the Men’s Resource Center for Change. Both a social service agency and a social justice organization, MRC made an impact in communities around and far beyond western Massachusetts. It offered workshops, classes, support groups, trainings, and consultations for adult men and youths, on issues relating to violence, anger, surviving abuse, emotional well-being, race, fatherhood, sexuality, and more. In 2016, after several years of financial struggle in the wake of the recession of the late 2000s, MRC announced its plans to merge with Men’s Resources International (MRI), founded by Botkin in 2004, to form MERGE for Equality, Inc. Voice Male, now a national magazine, has a robust online presence as an independent publication.

The MRC Records span most of the organization’s history and include correspondence and memos, background reading and training material, fliers and other ephemera, annual reports, newsletters and copies of Voice Male, clippings (including Voice Male articles organized by subject), and audio and video tapes.

Subjects
  • Masculinity
  • Men’s movement
  • Violence in men
Contributors
  • Okun, Rob A.
Types of material
  • Annual reports
  • Clippings (information artifacts)
  • Fliers (printed matter)
  • Newsletters

Mercantile House (Portland, Me.)

Mercantile House Ledger
1792-1804
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 285

Firm based in Portland, Maine, that supplied “merchandize” to local merchants in Maine, as well as in several locations in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and northeastern Massachusetts. Firm undertook international “adventures” as well. Ledger includes general accounts for merchandise, bills receivable and payable, cash, profit and loss, storage, and truckage, as well as accounts generated with certain ships.

Subjects
  • Maine--Commerce--18th century
  • Maine--Commerce--Massachusetts--18th century
  • Maine--Commerce--New Hampshire--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Commerce--Maine--18th century
  • Merchants--Maine--Portland--18th century
  • New Hampshire--Commerce--Maine--18th century
  • Portland (Me.)--Commerce--18th century
  • Shipping--Accounting--18th century
  • Storage and moving trade--Maine--18th century
Types of material
  • Account books

Mick, Robert J. H.

Robert J. H Mick Papers
1950-1991
1 box (1.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 677

Originally a proponent of fluoridating the water supply, the dentist Robert J.H. Mick became an ardent opponent following animal studies he conducted in the late 1940s. Although he alleged that he was threatened with court martial for his views while serving in the Army in Germany between 1953 and 1956, Mick has remained a high profile professional critic of fluoridation, famously offering a $100,000 prize to any one who could prove that fluoridation of water was healthy. The prize remained unclaimed. Mick ran as a Republican for congress in New Jersey in 1970, largely as an antifluoridation crusader.

The Mick Papers contain a small quantity of correspondence, talks, and affidavits relating to a deacdes-long career in the antifluoridation movement, as well as publications and other materials relating to fluoridation of water supplies.

Subjects
  • Antifluoridation movement--New Jersey
  • Fluorides--Toxicology
Contributors
  • Mick, Robert J. H.
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Miller Family

Miller Family Photographs
ca.1880-1980
1 boxes, 1 oversize envelope (1.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 119

Four generations of the Miller family from Roxbury and Hull, Massachusetts. Includes photographs mounted on twenty-eight sheets of posterboard and 158 slides stored in two slide trays that are comprised of formal and informal family portraits; family businesses; church and business gatherings; a wedding announcement; and postcards from the early 1900s depicting public recreation sites. More recent photographs reveal how the public recreation sites have changed over the years. Robert Parker Miller, a graduate of the University of Massachusetts Amherst and a member of the Miller family, displayed these images in an exhibit entitled “Trying to Live the American Dream” (1986, Wheeler Gallery).

Subjects
  • Family--United States--History
  • Hull (Mass.)--Photographs
  • Massachusetts--Social life and customs--19th century--Photographs
  • Massachusetts--Social life and customs--20th century--Photographs
  • Roxbury (Mass.)--Pictorial works
Contributors
  • Miller family
Types of material
  • Photographs

Morley, Cathrin

Cathrin Morley Poetry Album
1832-1837
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 136 bd

Possibly a worker who boarded in Van Duesenville, a growing industrial area of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Notebook consists of poems, most of which concern religious faith and local events that were written in Cathrin Morley’s hand but may not have been created by her. Also includes a list of significant family dates.

Subjects
  • Christian poetry, American--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Death--Poetry
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--History
  • Morley family
  • Sex role--Massachusetts--Great Barrington--Poetry
  • Spiritual life--Poetry
  • Van Duesenville (Great Barrington, Mass.)
  • Women--Poetry
Contributors
  • Morley, Cathrin
Types of material
  • Notebooks
  • Poems

Morris, William, 1834-1896

William Morris, The friendship of Amis and Amile
ca.1894
1 item (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 362 bd

A leader in the English Arts and Crafts movement, William Morris translated the ancient French romance, Amis and Amile, in 1894, one of a number of romances he published in his literary efforts to restore the middle ages.

This holograph copy of Morris’s short story was prepared for the Kelmscott Press in 1894 and printed in a run of 500. The first American edition appeared later that year, published by Thomas Bird Mosher.

Subjects
  • Kelmscott Press
Contributors
  • Morris, William, 1834-1896
Types of material
  • Holographs (Autographs)

Moss, Bernard

Bernie Moss Photograph Collection
ca. 1960-1978
7 boxes (10.5 linear feet)
Call no.: PH 062
Image of Bernie Moss with two unidentified women in Moss's home, 1962
Bernie Moss with two unidentified women in Moss's home, 1962

A fixture of the Boston Jazz scene, Bernie Moss began taking photographs in the early 1960s, capturing musicians on stage and after hours in the clubs he frequented. Musicians that Moss would meet at Connelly’s, the Savoy Cafe, Lennie’s on the Turnpike, and later the Jazz Workshop, would often come to Moss’s apartment at 11 Queensberry Street where he would give them a place to stay and a meal. His generosity and love of the music and musicians was renown among the top artists of the era; inspiring Dexter Gordon to compose the song “Boston” Bernie Moss in his honor. Moss was born on Christmas day in 1908 and grew up in a Jewish household. He played trombone as a member of the Massachusetts National Guard 241st Coast Artillery Regiment from 1929 to approximately 1939 but spent the remainder of his life looking after the Boston apartment buildings he inherited from his father, known as the Moss Realty Co. According to Nat Hentoff in his memoir Boston Boy, “he took care that none of his tenants ever knew him as a landlord. His brother collected the rent, and the janitor received all the complaints about services. Bernie just showed up to talk about jazz.” Moss died on February 13th, 1988.

The Bernie Moss Photograph Collection primarily consists of Moss’s color photographs taken at Boston Jazz clubs in the 1960s and early 1970s. The photographs include musicians Alan Dawson, Roy Haynes, John Coltrane, Ben Webster, Dizzy Gillespie, Yusef Lateef, Herbie Hancock, Art Blakey, and many more. Moss’s amateur style brings life to some of the most important years of modern Jazz, showing Jazz greats at the height of their powers, often in informal settings. Many photographs were mounted and catalogued as part of a traveling exhibit curated by the Boston Jazz Society.

Subjects
  • Jazz musicians--Massachusetts--Boston--Photographs
  • Jazz--Massachusetts--Boston--Photographs
Types of material
  • Color prints (photographs)

Mountain House (South Deerfield, Mass.)

Views from and of the Mountain House, summit of Sugar-Loaf Mountain, South Deerfield, Mass.
ca.1865
3 photographs (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: PH 042
Image of Mountain House, ca.1865
Mountain House, ca.1865

A popular tourist destination during the post-Civil War years, the Mountain House hotel was built on the summit of Sugar Loaf Mountain, in South Deerfield, Mass., by Granville Wardwell in 1864 on property owned by his father-in-law Dwight Jewett. Positioned near the southern end of the mountain, the hotel provided tourists with a stunning panoramic vista of the Connecticut River Valley.

This small collection consists of three scenic cartes de visite from a larger series featuring views from the Mountain House. The images include No. 6, a view of five persons perched on the southeast promontory of Sugar Loaf with a view to the northeast across the Connecticut River to Mt. Toby; No. 10, Mountain House with a group of nine men and women posed on the lawn with telescope and tripod; No. 18, view of barns at the southern base of Sugar Loaf Mountain.

Subjects
  • Mountain House (South Deerfield, Mass.)--Photographs
  • South Deerfield (Mass.) -- Pictorial works
  • Sugar Loaf Mountain (Mass.)--Photographs
Contributors
  • Wardwell, Granville
Types of material
  • Photographs
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