Results for: “Amherst Bulletin” (658 collections)SCUA

Williams, Roger

Roger Williams Account Book, 1808-1822.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 619 bd

During the early decades of the nineteenth century, Roger Williams ran a ferry in West Springfield, Mass., carrying passengers and freight across the Connecticut River.

The Williams ledger is a combination daybook and account book, recording several dozen transactions of a Connecticut River ferryman, centered on the years around the War of 1812. Most of the entries are brief records of trips carrying individuals or freight across the river, however a few provide indications of other economic activity, including framing and joining, making a coffin, fixing sleds, and cidering.

Subjects

  • Ferries--Massachusetts--Connecticut River
  • West Springfield (Mass.)

Contributors

  • Williams, Roger

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Wing, Paul, 1792-1822

Paul Wing Account Book, 1805-1824.

1 vol. (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 215 bd

Seaman from Rochester, Massachusetts. Accounts provide information on work done, cargo and passengers carried, wages, ship expenses, and port charges. Also includes accounts of Philip Wing, Paul’s older brother, for agricultural, butchering, and ship carpentry work, as well as a loose sheet concerning probate court proceedings probably relating to the settling of Paul Wing’s estate after his death.

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Accounting--History--19th century
  • Harbors--Port charges--History--19th century
  • Merchant mariners--Salaries, etc.--History--19th century
  • Rochester (Mass. : Town)--Commerce--History--19th century
  • Rochester (Mass. : Town)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Shipping--Accounting--History--19th century
  • Ships--Cargo--History--19th century
  • Ships--Equipment and supplies--History--19th century
  • Ships--Maintenance and repair--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Wing, Paul, 1792-1822
  • Wing, Philip, 1788-

Types of material

  • Account books

Wolf, Lloyd

Lloyd Wolf Photograph Collection, 1989.

13 digital color prints
Call no.: PH 008
Deadhead, 1989.  Photo by Lloyd Wolf
Deadhead, 1989. Photo by Lloyd Wolf

A photographer from Washington, D.C., Lloyd Wolf is a well known photojournalist and documentarian who often works on topics in social change. During the course of a career that began in the late 1970s, Wolf has worked on projects ranging from documenting the impact of the Vietnam Memorial in Washington, D.C., to Jewish mothers and fathers, Moroccan Jewry, drug rehabilitation in prison, and Black-Jewish dialog.

The 13 images in the collection are part of Wolf’s series, “Acid Reign,” a project conducted in 1989 with a sociologist from UNC-Greensboro, Rebecca Adams, exploring the lives of dedicated Deadheads. The prints were made for exhibition at the symposium, Unbroken Chain: the Grateful Dead in Music, Culture, and Memory, held at UMass Amherst in November 2007. All rights remain with Lloyd Wolf.

Subjects

  • Deadheads (Music fans)--Photographs

Contributors

  • Wolf, Lloyd

Types of material

  • Photographs

Wood, Josiah

Josiah Wood Papers, 1854-1874.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 363

A veteran of the Civil War and one time resident of the Hopedale community, Josiah Wood tried his hand at several lines of work during his life, including tin-peddler, farmer, and carpenter.

The Josiah Wood Papers consist primarily of letters between Wood, living in Hopedale and New Bedford, Massachusetts, and his relatives in Philadelphia and elsewhere in the northeastern and western parts of the country. While some of the correspondence contains references to larger-scale historical events, such as the Civil War or westward expansion, the majority concerns events and routines of everyday family life. The letters illustrate the considerable effort made to keep in touch with and informed about distant family members and friends.

Subjects

  • Spiritualism--United States--History--19th century
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • West (U.S.)--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Wood, Josiah
  • Wood, Lurana P

Woodbury Boarding House

Woodbury House Boarding Register, 1804-1920.

1 vol. (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 172 bd

Boarding house on Folly Cove in Gloucester, Massachusetts, and boarding house at Echo Hill Cottage, perhaps also in Gloucester. Includes names of visitors, callers, boarders, and lodgers (some family friends and neighbors, others unknown guests) who hailed primarily from Massachusetts but also from states around the country. Also contains early accounts from 1804, guests at a Christmas party, lists of members of the Lanesville Universalist Church and Society who died or moved away, moral and religious verses entered by “Grand Ma”, and numerous preserved dried flowers and foliage, among other notations.

Subjects

  • Boardinghouses--Massachusetts--Gloucester
  • Gloucester (Mass.)--History

Types of material

  • Guest registers

Woodbury, Walter B. (Walter Bentley), 1834-1885

Walter B. Woodbury Photograph Collection, 1865-1866.

2 boxes (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 003
Tanah Abang House, ca.1866
Tanah Abang House, ca.1866

In the late 1850s and early 1860s, the pioneering British photographer Walter Woodbury captured images of Java, and especially its capital city Batavia (modern day Jakarta). Working in partnership with James Page, the two established a photographic firm that continued to produce and sell images long after Woodbury’s return to England in 1863.

Consisting of 42 albumen prints, the Woodbury Collection includes numerous images of the landscape and colonial buildings in Batavia, Buitenzorg (Bogor), and Surabaya. A few photographs capture images of the European community in Java, and local Javanese residents.

Subjects

  • Bogor (Indonesia)--Photographs
  • Indonesia--Photographs
  • Jakarta (Indonesia)--Photographs
  • Java (Indonesia)--Photographs
  • Surabaya (Indonesia)--Photographs

Contributors

  • Woodbury & Page
  • Woodbury, Walter B. (Walter Bentley), 1834-1885

Types of material

  • Albumen prints
  • Photograps

Woodcock, Christopher L. F.

Christopher L. F. Woodcock Papers, 1968-1974.

2 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 158

The distinguished cellular biologist Chris Woodcock came to UMass Amherst in 1972 after receiving a doctorate at the University College London (1966) and appointments at the University of Chicago and Harvard. During a long and highly productive career, Woodcock became widely known for work on the structure and functions of the cell nucleus and its components, applying a variety of advanced techniques to investigate the architecture and dynamics and chromatin folding at the nucleosome level and the larger scale architecture of chromosomes. A prolific grant writer and recipient, he helped build the Central Microscopy Facility at UMass, serving as its Director, and was appointed Gilbert Woodside Chair in Zoology in 1994.

The Woodcock collection consists of a series of laboratory notebooks kept during his early research on the green alga Acetabularia, accompanied by hundreds of electron micrographic photographs of cellular structures.

Subjects

  • Cytology
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Zoology

Types of material

  • Laboratory notes

Woodward, John

John Woodward Account book, 1838-1868.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 063 bd

John Woodward was a farmer in Groton, Mass., during the middle decades of the nineteenth century. Although little is known of his life, it appears that Woodward was born in nearby Tyngsboro on March 7, 1813, and that he married twice: first to Rebecca Sawtelle of Groton in 1823 and second to Mary Jane Nutting — almost 30 years his junior — in Dec. 1866. With Mary Jane, at least, he was highly reproductive, fathering his first son, a seventh child, at the age of 66. Woodward died in Groton on Apr. 20, 1895, and was buried in his family’s ancestral home of Dunstable.

John Woodward’s accounts document the financial transactions of fairly typical farmer in Groton over the period of three decades. Raising an array of produce, from cranberries and chestnuts, to squash, barley, apples, and turnips, Woodward also raised poultry and a variety of livestock. The ledger documents the day to day exchanges of food and labor that comprised the core of the local economy. Noteworthy among his customers are locally prominent families such as Blood and Swett and at least two Nuttings.

Subjects

  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Groton
  • Groton (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century

Types of material

  • Account books

Workmen’s Circle/Arbeter Ring

Workmen's Circle Bulletins Collection, 1926-1928.

1 envelope (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 164 bd

Created by immigrants as a mutual aid society, the Workmen’s Circle has been around for more than 100 years, and has grown into a national organization with branches throughout the United States. Early issues addressed by the group include building tuberculosis sanitoriums, providing a healthcare and insurance benefit network for members, and creating Labor Lyceums that offered adult education to immigrants and workers.

The collection consists of 10 issues of the group’s publication, the Workmen’s Circle Bulletin, produced in New York City from 1926-1928 and published in Yiddish.

Subjects

  • Jews--Social conditions--United States
  • Mutual aid societies
  • Working class--New York

Worthington (Mass.) Tavern

Worthington (Mass.) Tavern Account Book, 1826-1854.

1 vol. (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 421 bd

By the turn of the nineteenth century, the Hampshire County town of Worthington, Massachusetts, was a significant crossroads on the Boston-Albany Turnpike, belying its small size. The population in Worthington peaked at barely over 1,000 in 1810, and declined slowly thereafter, although it remained an active stopover on the road for many years.

This standard double column account book provides a concentrated record of financial and other transactions in the antebellum period, probably associated with a tavern in Worthington, Mass. Although the ledger’s keeper is unidentified, it records an assortment of odd jobs filing saws, smoking meat, lending horses, carting, pasturing cattle, and tending sheep, along with the sale of significant quantities of beer and cider and a regular stream of hard brandy and rum. There are records as well of providing meals and, in one instance, caring for prisoners and their keepers overnight (p. 21). Most of the clients who can be positively identified were residents of Worthington (e.g., Persis Knapp, Chauncy B. Rising, Nathan Searl, Shubal Parish, Elisha H. Brewster, Addison D. Perry, Merritt Hall, and Otis Boies), however others are noted as wayfarers, passing through from towns such as Whately or Hadley. Clients settled their accounts with a motley mixture of cash, goods, and labor.

Subjects

  • Taverns (Inns)--Massachusetts--Worthington
  • Worthington (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century

Types of material

  • Account books
Special Collections and University Archives logo