University of Massachusetts Amherst
Special Collections and University Archives
UMass Amherst Libraries
SCUA

You searched for: "“Schools--Records and Correspondence”" (page 60 of 72)

  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 57
  5. 58
  6. 59
  7. 60
  8. 61
  9. 62
  10. 63
  11. ...
  12. 72

Robinson, Craig D.

Craig D. Robinson Papers
ca.1980-2007
4 boxes (6 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 739
Image of Robinson for president flier
Robinson for president flier

A labor attorney and activist, Craig Robinson was born in Hartford, Conn., on August 6, 1952, and raised in Stafford. After rising tuition led him to drop out of the University of Connecticut in 1971, Robinson worked in a variety of manual jobs until he was hired by the US Postal Service in 1974. From the time of his assignment to the bulk mail facility in Springfield the next year, Robinson was an active member of the American Postal Workers Union, eventually serving as steward, vice president, and president of his Local, and his activism often created friction with management. Earning his BA at UMass Amherst (1980) and JD from the Western New England School of Law (1984), he began practicing labor law, moving to full time in 1991. Devoted to workplace justice, he served as General Counsel for the Pioneer Valley Central Labor Council and for Locals of the United Roofers Union and Amalgamated Transit Union, among others, and was a founding board member of the Western Massachusetts Coalituion for Occupational Safety and Health. Robinson died on June 17, 2007, and is survived by his wife Linda Tonoli, and son.

The Robinson papers contain a record of labor activism in the Pioneer Valley and beyond. The collection incldues retained copies of legal filings relating to arbitration and other labor-related cases, along with articles written by and about Robinson, and an assortment of other notes and correspondence.

Gift of Linda Tonoli, Apr. 2012
Subjects
  • American Postal Workers Union
  • Labor laws and legislation
  • Labor lawyers--Massachusetts
  • Pioneer Valley Central Labor Council
Contributors
  • Robinson, Craig D.

Rodin, Phyllis

Phyllis Rodin Papers
1950-2014
ca.50 boxes (75 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 894
Image of Phyllis Rodin
Phyllis Rodin

Born into a Jewish Lithuanian family in Williamsburg., N.Y., on May 10, 1914, Phyllis Rodin was drawn to the struggle for peace and social justice from early in life. Her widowed mother set an example as an antiwar activist and advocate for women’s rights, and after marrying at age 18, Phyllis and her husband ran a dairy farm that they reorganized on cooperative principles in the 1930s. A watershed in her life came after witnessing the suffering of war first hand while engaged as a psychiatric aid worker for the Red Cross during the Second World War. From that point, Rodin was an unrelenting activist for peace, traveling internationally and remaining vocal through the McCarthy era and Vietnam War and diving headlong into the second wave of the feminist movement. Returning to school late in life, she completed an undergraduate degree at Wisconsin before moving to Amherst in 1980 to study for a doctorate in Future Studies through the UMass Department of Education. Her activism barely skipped a beat as she worked closely with Quaker groups and stalwart activists such as her friend Frances Crowe to oppose nuclear weapons and violence in all forms. Rodin died in Amherst on Jan. 2015.

The Rodin Papers are the product of a long life of a woman devoted to the struggle for peace, feminism, and social justice. Richer in documenting Rodin’s latter decades and the philosophy of world peace she honed, the collection contains an abundance of correspondence, ephemera, and audiovisual materials related to international work in peacebuilding.

Acquired from Anne Griffin, Dec. 2015
Subjects
  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Feminists
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts

Rosenberg, Stanley C.

Stan Rosenberg Papers
ca.1991-2008
88 boxes (132 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 556

Graduating from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1977, Stan Rosenberg began his career in politics as an aide to state Senator John Olver from 1980-1983. By 1986 he was elected to the Massachusetts House of Representatives where he served until 1991 when he was elected to the state Senate, a seat vacated by U.S. Congressmen John Olver. The Democratic Senator has served in the Senate ever since, assuming a number of leadership positions from chair of the Senate Committee on Ways and Means to President Pro Tem of the Massachusetts Senate. Representing towns in Hampshire and Franklin counties, Senator Rosenberg was a moving force behind a campaign finance reform bill that reduced the role of private money in the state’s political system.

Although the collection continues to grow, it currently consists of correspondence, publications, and subject files relating to particular initiatives led by Rosenberg.

Gift of Stanley Rosenberg, 2007-2013
Subjects
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Massachusetts. Senate
Contributors
  • Rosenberg, Stanley C.

Rotundo, Barbara

Barbara Rotundo Photograph Collection
ca.1970-2004
9 boxes (10 linear feet)
Call no.: PH 050
Image of

A long-time member of the English Department at the University of Albany, Barbara Rotundo was a 1942 graduate in economics at Mount Holyoke College. After the death of her husband, Joseph in 1953, Rotundo became one of the first female faculty members at Union College, and after earning a master’s degree in English at Cornell University and a doctorate in American Literature from Syracuse University, she served as an associate professor of English at the University of Albany, where she founded one of the first university writing programs in the United States. Avocationally, she was a stalwart member of the Association for Gravestone Studies, helping to broaden its scope beyond its the Colonial period to include the Victorian era. Her research included the rural cemetery movement, Mount Auburn Cemetery, white bronze (zinc) markers, and ethnic folk gravestones. Her research in these fields was presented on dozens of occasions to annual meetings of AGS, the American Culture Association, and The Pioneer America Society. In 1989, after residing in Schenectady for forty-six years, she retired to Belmont, NH, where she died in December 2004.

Consisting primarily of thousands of color slides (most digitized) and related research notebooks, the Rotundo collection is a major visual record of Victorian grave markers in the United States. The notebooks and slides are arranged by state, with an emphasis on the eastern states, and white bronze (zinc) markers also are represented in photographs and a separate research notebook. The collection also includes several rare or privately published books.

Subjects
  • Cemeteries--New York (State)
  • Gravestones--New Jersey
  • Gravestones--New York (State)
  • Gravestones--Pennsylvania
Contributors
  • Rotundo, Barbara
Types of material
  • Photographs

Rudolph, Ellie

Ellie Rudolph Papers
ca.1975-2002
25 boxes (37.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 680

A resident of Oakmont, Pa., near Pittsburgh, Ellie Rudolph has worked with a number of grassroots organizations to oppose fluoridation of the water supply. One of the activists in the landmark 1978 case that prevented fluoridation in the borough of West View, Pa., Rudolph has worked with the Pennsylvania Environmental Network, was a founding member of the Fluoride Action Network, and a former director of the Pennsylvania Chapter of Health Alliance International.

The Rudolph Papers document almost three decades of grassroots antifluoridation activism, primarily in western Pennsylvania. The collection includes a wide array of material relating to the antifluoridation struggle, including several feet of topical files, some correspondence, reprints of scientific and popular articles on the subject and videotapes.

Gift of Richard M. Bevis, Jan. 2010
Subjects
  • Antifluoridation movement--Pennsylvania
  • Fluorides--Environmental aspects
  • Fluorides--Toxicology
Contributors
  • Fluoride Action Network
  • Pennsylvania Environmental Network
  • Rudolph, Ellie
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Videotapes

Sagendorph Woolen Co.

Sagendorph Woolen Company Daybook
1885-1887
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 430

The Sagendorph Woolen Company of East Brookfield, located about sixty miles southwest of Boston in Worcester County, Massachusetts, maintained sixteen looms and specialized in the carding of shoddy and the manufacture of cashmeres, repellents, and suitings. There is some evidence that Sagendorph also spun raw materials for other companies and sold some textile goods on commission.

This daybook records the daily transactions between the Sagendorph Woolen Company and other businesses, local residents, and the company’s labor force. These detailed entries present a dynamic picture of the company’s manufacturing operations ranging from the purchase of raw materials to the sales of finished products.

Subjects
  • Carding (textiles)
  • East Brookfield (Mass.)--History
  • Textile construction processes and techniques
  • Textile industry--Massachusetts--History
  • Textile manufacturers--Massachusetts
  • Textile materials
  • Yarn-making processes and techniques
Contributors
  • Sagendorph Woolen Company
Types of material
  • Daybooks

Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah

Tiyo Attallah Salah-El Papers
1890-2006
15 boxes (7.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 590
Image of Tiyo Atallah Salah-El playing saxophone in high school
Tiyo Atallah Salah-El playing saxophone in high school

While serving a life sentence in a Pennsylvania prison, Tiyo Attallah Salah-El transformed himself into an activist, scholar, and advocate for the abolition of prisons. An accomplished jazz musician, Salah-El has distinguished himself for educational and scholarly work, his musical career, his close relationship with activists and educators, and for the non-profit organization he founded, The Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons (CAP).

The Papers of Tiyo Attallah Salah-El document his experience in the State Correctional Institution in Dallas, Pennsylvania from 1977 to the present, providing information on his education, teaching, and activism. The bulk of the collection consists of his extensive correspondence with educators, musicians, and activists. Other highlights include a manuscript copy of his autobiography and the founding documents of the The Coalition for the Abolition of Prisons.

Subjects
  • Criminal justice, Administration of
  • Jazz musicians
  • Prisoners--United States
  • Prisons--United States
  • Quakers
Contributors
  • Ahrens, Lois
  • Nagel, Mechthild
  • Neill, Montgomery
  • Salah-El, Tiyo Attallah
  • Zinn, Howard, 1922-
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Sandgren, Craig D.

Craig D. Sandgren Papers
1978-2010
8 boxes (12 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 898

A native of Minneapolis and graduate of the University of Minnesota, Craig Sandgren received his doctorate at the University of Washington (1978) for research conducted at the Friday Harbor Marine Biological Laboratories on the resting cysts of chrysophyte plankton. After a stint on faculty at the University of Texas Arlington, Sandgren landed at the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, where he remained for twenty five years, emerging as a leader in the field of phytoplankton ecology. Although widely known for his work on reproductive patterns in chryosphytes and on the fine structure of their various life stages, his work extended to both marine and fresh water environments and included studies of algae and plankton, aquatic ecology, and intertidal life, among other topics. A popular teacher and avid field biologist, he maintained a strong connection to Friday Harbor throughout his career but maintained active projects in lakes across the northern Midwest as well. Sandgren passed away on Dec. 24, 2011, after a battle with pancreatic cancer.

The Sandgren papers includes a small quantity of professional correspondence, grant proposals, offprints, and other miscellaneous materials relating to his career, along with hundreds of electron micrographs of chrysophytes, videotapes, and photographs.

Gift of Maria Terrer-Sandgren, Dec. 2015
Subjects
  • Chrysophytes
  • Lake ecology
  • Marine ecology
  • Plankton
Types of material
  • Electron micrographs
  • Photographs
  • Videotapes

Sargent, Orlando, 1728-1803

Orlando Sargent Account Book
1753-1808
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 139

Prosperous, slave-owning farmer from Amesbury, Massachusetts, who also served as town warden, selectman, and representative. Includes details of the purchases of agricultural products (corn, potatoes, lamb, rye, hay, molasses, wood, cheese), and related services with some of the town’s earliest settlers, widow’s expenses, expenses in support of his grandmother, and family dates.

Subjects
  • Agricultural prices--Massachusetts--Amesbury--History--18th century
  • Amesbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Amesbury (Mass.)--History--18th century--Biography
  • Amesbury (Mass.)--Officials and employees--History--18th century
  • Farm produce--Massachusetts--Amesbury--History--18th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Amesbury--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Sargent family
Contributors
  • Sargent, Orlando, 1728-1803
Types of material
  • Account books

Satir, Birgit H.

Birgit H. and Peter Satir Papers
1970-2000
37 boxes (55.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 706

Distinguished researchers in the Department of Anatomy and Structural Biology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Birgit and Peter Satir have made fundamental contributions to the study of exocytosis and the ultrastructure of cellular motility. While working on his doctorate at the Rockefeller Institute, Peter spent 1958 studying at the Carlsberg Biological Institute in Copenhagen, where he met Birgit. After completing their degrees in 1961 and marrying the next year, the couple went on to academic appointments at the University of Chicago and Berkeley. Although they are considered the first couple to be allowed to work in the same department at Berkeley, Birgit was never fully salaried, prompting the Satirs to move to more favorable circumstances at Einstein in 1977. Birgit’s research has centered on the nature of microdomains in cell membranes and how cells secrete chemical products, while Peter has studied the role of the structure and function of cilia and flagellae in cell motility.

The Satir collection contains professional correspondence, journals, and several thousand electron micrographs and motion picture films of ciliates and flagellates taken in the course of their research.

Subjects
  • Cell biology
  • Ciliates
  • Flagellata
  • Protozoans--Composition
Contributors
  • Satir, Birgit H.
  • Satir, Peter
Types of material
  • Scanning electron micrographs
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. ...
  4. 57
  5. 58
  6. 59
  7. 60
  8. 61
  9. 62
  10. 63
  11. ...
  12. 72

© 2017 * SCUA * UMass Amherst Libraries

Log in | Site policies