You searched for: "“United States. Census Office--Officials and employees --Massachusetts--History”" (page 6 of 41)

Green Mountain Post Films

Green Mountain Post Films Records

1968-ca.1985
10 boxes 13 linear feet
Call no.: MS 516

Co-founded by Charles Light and Daniel Keller, Green Mountain Post Films has produced and distributed films for more than twenty-five years. Their first documentary film released in 1975, Lovejoy’s Nuclear War, was one of the first films to question the nuclear energy policy of the United States. Since then GMP Films has continued to produce movies that explore social issues, and their films have been used as educational and organizational tools for activists working on peace, veteran, nuclear, environmental and other related issues.

The collection contains very little that documents the activities of GMP Films, chiefly research files, correspondence, and proposals relating to film projects either produced or under consideration. The bulk of the collection consists of alternative press publications from the 1960s-1970s.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Nuclear energy--Law and legislation--New England
  • Social action--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Green Mountain Post Films
Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston

Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston Records

1937-1997
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 466

The oldest active Polish folk dance ensemble in the United States, the Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston was formed in 1937 by a group of young ladies of Polish heritage interested in promoting Polish culture through the mediums of song and dance. The club opened its membership to young men in 1947, and was offcially incorporated in 1957. Since its formation, the dancers have appeared throughout the U.S., Canada, and Poland, and the group has received recognition and awards worldwide, including a special performance before his Holiness Pope John Paul II in 1983.

The collection includes programs for performances from the club’s earliest days, tickets, newspaper clippings featuring articles about the group, and copies of the organization’s constitution describing the group’s mission and membership.

Subjects

  • Folk dancing, Polish
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston
Kramer, Susan

Kramer-Mathews-Gyorgy Collection

1969-1988
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: PH 080
Image of The Farm in fall color, Oct. 1980
The Farm in fall color, Oct. 1980

Founded in August 1968 by Marshall Bloom and a group of colleagues from the Liberation News Service. From the outset, the Montague Farm Commune was a center of political and cultural (and countercultural) creatvity. In its first year, it was the headquarters for the Montague branch of the Liberation News Service and Farmers were involved in a range of other causes. Most famously, in 1974, Farmers lit the fuse of the antinuclear movement. Rallying against a proposed nuclear power plant in Montague and Farmer Sam Lovejoy’s act of civil disobedience that felled a weather monitoring tower set up in preparation, the Farmers carried waged a campaign of non-violent direct action that became the hallmark of antinuclear groups across the country. Their actions against the Yankee Rowe and Seabrook (N.H.) power plants were instrumental in dampening further development of nuclear power in the United States. In 2003, the Farm community agreed to sell the Farm property to Zen Peacemakers.

The photographs in this collection were taken by three members of the Montague Farm Commune: early members Anna Gyorgy and Tony Mathews, and Tony’s wife Susan Kramer. The photos depict daily life on the Farm and its residents, primarily in he period between 1978 and 1981, including farm work, sugaring, domestic chores, family and children, holidays, and celebrations, such as May Day. A handful of images, mostly by Mathews, go back to the earliest days of the Farm, and there are later images from the 20th and 25th reunions. Of special notes are over 100 images taken by Kramer during the occupation of the Seabroon Nuclear Power Plant in May 1977, at which 1,414 occupiers were arrested.

Gift of Susan Kramer and Anna Gyorgy. Jan. 2018

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--New Hampshire--Photographs
  • Communal living--Massachusetts--Montague--Photographs
  • Demonstrations--New Hampshire--Seabrook--Photographs
  • Montague Farm Community--Photographs
  • Organic farming--Massachusetts--Montague--Photographs
  • Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant (N.H.)--Photographs

Contributors

  • Gyorgy, Anna
  • Mathews, Tony

Types of material

  • Photographs
Kugrens, Paul

Paul Kugrens Papers

1994-2006
4 boxes 1.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 629

A specialist in the cryptophycaea, Paul Kugrens was born in Latvia in 1942 and lived in Pegnitz, Germany, until he emigrated to the United States with his parents at the age of eight. After receiving bachelors and masters degrees in zoology at the University of Nebraska and a doctorate at Berkeley (1971), Kugrens joined the faculty at Colorado State, remaining there for thirty-seven years. His research centered on the cell biology and ultrastructure of the cryptophytes Chroomonas, Cryptomonas, and Rhodomonas, and microalgae such as Prymnesium and Cyanophora.

The Kugrens papers include extensive documentation of the research and professional activities of a phycologist, including correspondence, grants proposals, manuscripts, and field data, along with thousands of electronic micrographs.

Gift of Terry Kugrens, Aug. 2009

Subjects

  • Algologists
  • Colorado State University--Faculty
  • Cyanobacteria--Composition

Contributors

  • Kugrens, Paul

Types of material

  • Scanning electron micrographs
Lenson, Michael, 1903-1971

Michael Lenson Collection

1969-1970
12 items 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 745

Born in Russia in 1903, the realist painter Michael Lenson emigrated to the United States at the age of eight, and from early in life, took an interest in art. While a student at the National Academy of Design in 1928, Lenson was awarded the Chaloner Paris Prize, enabling him to spend four years of study in Europe and leading to his first three one man shows. With the Great Depression in full effect upon his return to America, he accepted a position as director of mural projects for the Works Progress Administration in New Jersey, through which he built a reputation as one of the most important muralists in the eastern states. Exhibited widely, he was productive as both an artist and critic until his death in 1971. His works are included in the collections of the RISD Museum, the Maier Museum of Art, the Johnson Museum of Art, the Newark Museum, the Montclair Art Museum, and the Wolfsonian Collection, among others.

Consisting of pencil portraits of poets, each approximately 12 x 18″, the Lenson Collection contains twelve late works by Michael Lenson that were included in an exhibition held at the Montclair Art Museum in 1970. The subjects of the portraits include William Blake, Robert Browning, George Gordon Lord Byron, Robert Burns, Geoffrey Chaucer, John Donne, T.S. Eliot, John Keats, John Milton, Sean O’Casey, Alexander Pope, and Percy Bysshe Shelley.

Subjects

  • Blake, William , 1757-1827
  • Browning, Robert, 1812-1889
  • Burns, Robert, 1759-1796
  • Byron, George Gordon Byron, Baron, 1788-1824
  • Chaucer, Geoffrey, d. 1400
  • Donne, John, 1572-1631
  • Eliot, T. S. (Thomas Stearns), 1888-1965
  • Keats, John, 1795-1821
  • Milton, John, 1608-1674
  • O'Casey, Sean, 1880-1964
  • Pope, Alexander, 1688-1744
  • Shelley, Percy Bysshe, 1792-1822

Contributors

  • Lenson, Michael, 1903-1971

Types of material

  • Drawings (Visual works)
Lerner, Steve, 1946-

Steve Lerner Papers

1994-2011
15 boxes 22.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 673
Image of Diamond, La.
Diamond, La.

For decades, the writer Steve Lerner has been a significant contributor to public awareness of the issues surrounding environmental justice. Immersed in the environmental movement through his work as research director at Commonweal, a health and environment research institute founded with his brother Michael in 1976, Lerner earned wide recognition for his first book, Eco-Pioneers (1998), about “practical visionaries” who developed pragmatic solutions to environmental problems. In two subsequent books, Lerner turned to an examination of the impact of environmental toxins and industrial pollutants on low-income communities and people of color and the rise of grassroots opposition within those communities. In Diamond (2006), Lerner explored the impact of a Shell Chemical plant in Louisiana as a microcosm of the broader environmental-justice movement, and more recently, Sacrifice Zones (2010) traced the organization and resistance against industrial and chemical pollutants in a dozen communities in the eastern United States. In 2007, Lerner left his position at Commonweal, but continues his research and writing on environmental issues.

The research notes, interviews, photographs and other documentation comprising the Lerner collection form the basis for Lerner’s three major books.

Subjects

  • Environmental justice
  • Environmentalism

Types of material

  • Audiotapes
  • Photographs
Maslow, Jonathan Evan

Jonathan Evan Maslow Papers

ca.1978-2008
20 boxes 30 linear feet
Call no.: MS 639
Image of Jon Maslow
Jon Maslow

A man of diverse and interests, Jon Maslow was a naturalist and journalist, an environmentalist, traveler, and writer, whose works took his from the rain forests to the steppes to the salt marshes of his native New Jersey. Born on Aug. 4, 1948, in Long Branch, Maslow received his MA from the Columbia University School of Journalism (1974), after which he spent several years traveling through South and Central America, studying the flora and fauna, reporting and writing, before returning to the States. Always active in community affairs, he was a reporter with the Cape May County Herald (1997-2002) and the West Paterson Herald News (2002-2008). The author of six books, including The Owl Papers (1983), Bird of Life, Bird of Death, a finalist for the National Book Award in 1986, and Sacred Horses: Memoirs of a Turkmen Cowboy (1994), he often combined an intense interest in natural history with a deep environmentalist ethos and, particularly in the latter two cases, with a deep concern for the history of political turmoil. He died of cancer on Feb. 19, 2008.

A large and rich assemblage, the Maslow Papers document his career from his days as a young journalist traveling in Central America through his community involvements in New Jersey during the 2000s. An habitual rewriter, Maslow left numerous drafts of books and articles, and the collection includes valuable correspondence with colleagues and friends, including his mentor Philip Roth, as well as Maslow’s fascinating travel diaries.

Subjects

  • Authors--New Jersey
  • Central America--Description and travel
  • Journalists--New Jersey
  • New Jersey--History
  • Reporters and reporting--New Jersey

Contributors

  • Maslow, Jonathan Evan
  • Roth, Philip
McIntosh, Beatrice A.

Beatrice A. McIntosh Cookery Collection

ca.1880-2005
ca.8,000 items 200 linear feet
Call no.: MS 395

The McIntosh Cookery Collection includes books, pamphlets, and ephemera relating to the history of cookery in New England. Of particular note are nearly 7,500 cookbooks prepared by community organizations from the 1880s to the present, usually for fund-raising or charitable purposes. These cookbooks were produced by a variety of organizations, including parent-teacher groups, churches and synagogues, social service agencies, private clubs, and historical societies as fund-raising projects.

These cookbooks document important aspects of the lives of families and women in the region, as well as ethnic groups and their adaptation of traditional foods to New England. The collection is focused primarily on New England, but includes cookbooks from other states for comparative purposes.

Subjects

  • Community cookbooks
  • Cookbooks
  • Cookery--New England
National Arts Policy Archive & Library (NAPAAL)

National Arts Policy Archive and Library

1965-2013
Image of

The National Arts Policy Archive and Library is a collaborative project initiated by SCUA, the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, and several partners in arts agencies intended to document the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state-level and national arts agencies, NAPAAL will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.

Constituent collections include:

Subjects

  • Art and state
  • Arts--Management
  • Government aid to the arts

Contributors

  • Americans for the Arts
  • National Asssembly of State Arts Agencies
  • National Endowment for the Arts
National Debate Tournament

National Debate Tournament Records

1949-1994
44 boxes 23.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 017
Image of Debaters, 1970
Debaters, 1970

The National Debate Tournament is one of the national championships for collegiate debating in the United States, seeking to exemplify excellence in scholarship, research, and argument. Originating at West Point in 1947 with twenty-nine teams, the Tournament now includes over eighty teams, with the site of the finals rotating annually among member schools.

The collections consists mostly of tournament booklets, ballots, correspondence, committee minutes, and tapes of the debates with accompanying transcripts.

Subjects

  • Debates and debating

Contributors

  • American Forensic Association

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Sound recordings
  • Videotapes