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Howe Family

Howe Family Papers, 1730-1955
7 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 019

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Howe family of Enfield and Dana, Massachusetts, including correspondence between family members, genealogies, account books and printed materials. Account books record transactions of various family members whose occupations included general storekeeper, minister, printer, postmaster, telephone exchange and gas-station owner, and document the transactions of community businesses and individuals, some of whom were women involved in the beginnings of the local palm leaf hat and mat industry.

Subjects
  • Bookkeeping--History--Sources
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Biography
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Enfield (Mass.)--History
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Howe family--Genealogy
  • Moneylenders--Massachusetts--Enfield--History
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
  • Swift River Valley (Mass.)--History
  • Swift River Valley (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
  • Howe, Donald W. (Donald Wiliam), 1982-1977
  • Howe, Edwin H., 1859-1943
  • Howe, Henry Clay Milton, b. 1823
  • Howe, John M.
  • Howe, John, 1783-1845
  • Howe, Theodocia Johnson, 1824-1898
Types of material
  • Account books
  • Business records
  • Deeds
  • Genealogies
  • Scrapbooks
  • Wills

Indusco Bailie Schools

Indusco Bailie School Collection, 1940-1952
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 564
Image of Bailie Technical School boys with masks
Bailie Technical School boys with masks

Following the Japanese invasion of China in 1937, the New Zealand expatriate Rewi Alley threw his considerable talents behind the war effort. Building upon knowledge acquired over a decade of living in China, Alley helped organize the Chinese Industrial Cooperative Movement (CIC). The CIC coordinated the creation of industrial cooperatives throughout unoccupied China to keep industrial production flowing, and it sponsored a series of industrial schools named after Alley’s friend Joseph Bailie to provide training and support.

The Indusco Bailie School Collection includes documents and photographs relating to the establishment and operation of the Bailie Schools in China during and immediately after the Second World War. Probably associated with the Indusco offices in New York City, these documents include a model constitution for industrial cooperatives, typewritten reports on Bailie Schools, and published articles describing the schools’ efforts. The reports extend through 1949, and include three mimeographed newsletters from the Shantan Bailie School for the months immediately following the school’s liberation by Communist forces. Also included are printed works by Alley and eighteen photographs taken between 1942 and 1944 of students and scenes at Bailie Schools.

Subjects
  • China--History--1937-1949
  • Chinese industrial cooperatives
  • Cooperative societies--China
  • Shantan Bailie School (Kansu, China)
  • Sino-Japanese War, 1937-1945
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Indusco
  • Rewi, Alley, 1897-1987
Types of material
  • Photographs

International Brotherhood of Paper Makers. Eagle Lodge

International Brotherhood of Paper Makers Local 1 (Eagle Lodge : Holyoke, Mass.) Records, 1901-1978
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 081

First organized as Eagle Lodge in Holyoke, Massachusetts, the United Brotherhood of Paper Makers was granted a charter by the AFL in May 1883. Almost as soon as the union was established, however, it faced a serious struggle for power from within. Hoping to maintain their higher economic and social status, the machine tenders ultimately organized their own union, and the two remained separate for a number of years until they finally merged in 1902 as the International Brotherhood of Paper Makers.

The surviving records of the Eagle Lodge, Local 1 of the International Brotherhood of Paper Makers, include by-laws, minutes, correspondence, some contracts, a ledger, and three histories of the local and the early days of the union.

Subjects
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Paper industry workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Paper industry workers--Massachusetts--Holyoke
Contributors
  • United Paperworkers International Union
Types of material
  • Minutes (Administrative records)

Keystone View Company

World War Through the Stereoscope and Stereographic Viewer Collection, ca. 1917-1923
2 boxes
Call no.: PH 077

The Keystone View Company was founded in Meadville, Penn., by Pennsylvania native B. L. Singley (1864-1938), who had been a salesman for the stereographic producer and distributor Underwood & Underwood. The first prints sold under the Keystone name were Singley’s own photographs of the 1892 French Creek flood. Incorporated in 1905, Keystone opened its Educational Department, creating products designed for classroom use, with an emphasis on social studies, geography, and the sciences. As the company grew, with branch offices in several major cities and staff photographers all over the world, it acquired the stereographic inventories of several of its competitors, including Underwood & Underwood, becoming the largest company of its kind in the world. In 1932, Keystone launched its Stereophthalmic Department, which included stereoscopic vision tests and products for correcting vision problems. Singley retired as Keystone’s president in 1936 or 1937, and Keystone was bought by Mast Development Company in 1963.

This 1923 boxed set, World War Through the Stereoscope, part of the “Stereographic Library” and housed in a box imitating the look of a two-volume set of books, contains 100 images of World War I and just after, taken ca. 1917-1921. The stereographic prints are pasted onto Keystone’s distinctive grey curved mounts, with extensive descriptive information on the reverse of each mount. Prints are numbered with identifiers—those beginning with “V” were originally Underwood photographs—as well as numbers indicating the order in which they are to be viewed. The stereographs are accompanied by a viewer, also manufactured by Keystone.

Gift of Ed Klekowski, May 2017
Subjects
  • World War, 1914-1918
Contributors
  • Keystone View Company
  • Singley, B. L. (Benjamin Lloyd)
  • Underwood & Underwood
Types of material
  • Photographs
  • Stereographs
  • Stereoscopes

Killgrove, Ethel A.

Ethel A. Killgrove Papers, 1948-1962 (Bulk: 1949-1951)
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 866
Image of Ethel A. Killgrove and Mr. Braden, Addis Ababa, 1950
Ethel A. Killgrove and Mr. Braden, Addis Ababa, 1950

Between 1948 and 1951, Chicagoan Ethel A. Killgrove worked as a missionary with the Sudan Interior Mission. A graduate of the St. Paul Bible Institute, Killgrove was based in Aden, Yemen, and worked spreading the gospel and in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia. After returning home in 1951, Killgrove studied education at Wheaton College (Bed, 1959) and Roosevelt (MEd., 1963), teaching in elementary schools in Illinois and Chester County, Pa. She died in Lancaster, Pa., in 2002.

The 142 letters that Killgrove wrote home to her parents and brother Tom include fascinating information on life as a missionary in British-controlled Aden and Ethiopia during the transitional years following the end of World War II. From her perspective on the southern rim of the Middle East, Killgore was witness to the of the impact of the formation of the state of Israel and the growing hostility toward colonial domination in the Arab world and Africa. The collection includes an excellent photograph album with 55 images of her time in mission, along with 65 other images.

Acquired from Michael Brown, May 2015
Subjects
  • Aden (Yemen)--Description and travel
  • Ethiopia--Description and travel
  • Missionaries--Africa
  • Missionaries--Ethiopia
  • Missionaries--Yemen
Contributors
  • Sudan Interior Mission
Types of material
  • Photographs

King, Anita

Anita King Papers, 1989-2003
3 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 727

A lifelong activist and organizer, King graduated from Smith College in 1937 and completed her master’s in social work at Columbia University. By the 1960s she was active with the Women’s International League for Peace and Freedom and later went on to work as an administrator with the National Institute of Mental Health. In 1988, King returned to the Pioneer Valley and opened up a small family therapy practice from her home in Williamsburg. Soon after, she began her affiliation with the Sierra Club’s population program recruiting students as interns and volunteers from her alma mater. After volunteering as the chair of the Massachusetts Sierra Club population committee for 19 years, Anita King retired at the age of 95 in 2011.

Part of the Global Population and Environmental Program of Sierra Club, the population program was headed by Anita King for nearly two decades. During that time she organized 20 lectures with speakers from a variety of organizations, such as Thoraya Obaid and Margaret Catley-Carlson. Her papers contain correspondence, speeches, administrative and subject files she kept on various issues through the early 2000s.

Gift of Anita King, Dec. 2011
Subjects
  • Overpopulation
  • Sierra Club. Massachusetts Chapter
Contributors
  • King, Anita

Kingsbury family

Kingsbury Family Papers, 1862-2006 (Bulk: 1881-1902)
10 boxes (6 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 504
Image of Kingsbury children, ca.1910
Kingsbury children, ca.1910

The family of Roxana Kingsbury Gould (nee Weed) farmed the rocky soils of western New England during the late nineteenth century. Roxana’s first husband Ambrose died of dysentery shortly after the Civil War, leaving her to care for their two infant sons, and after marrying her second husband, Lyman Gould, she relocated from southwestern Vermont to Cooleyville and then (ten years later) to Shelburne, Massachusetts. The Goulds added a third son to their family in 1869.

A rich collection of letters and photographs recording the history of the Kingsbury-Gould families of Shelburne, Massachusetts. The bulk of the letters are addressed to Roxana Kingsbury Gould, the strong-willed matriarch at the center of the family, and to her granddaughter, May Kingsbury Phillips, the family’s first historian. In addition to documenting the complicated dynamics of a close-knit family, this collection is a rich source for the study of local history, rural New England, and the social and cultural practices at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th centuries.

Gift of Conrad and Michiko Totman, 2006
Subjects
  • Conway (Mass.)--Genealogy
  • Kingsbury Family
  • Shelburne (Mass.)--Genealogy
  • Totman family
Contributors
  • Drew, Raymond Totman, 1923-1981
  • Lewis, Gertrude Minnie, 1896-
  • Totman, Conrad D
  • Totman, Ruth J
Types of material
  • Genealogies
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Memoirs
  • Photographs
  • Tintypes

Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston

Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston Records, 1937-1997
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 466

The oldest active Polish folk dance ensemble in the United States, the Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston was formed in 1937 by a group of young ladies of Polish heritage interested in promoting Polish culture through the mediums of song and dance. The club opened its membership to young men in 1947, and was offcially incorporated in 1957. Since its formation, the dancers have appeared throughout the U.S., Canada, and Poland, and the group has received recognition and awards worldwide, including a special performance before his Holiness Pope John Paul II in 1983.

The collection includes programs for performances from the club’s earliest days, tickets, newspaper clippings featuring articles about the group, and copies of the organization’s constitution describing the group’s mission and membership.

Subjects
  • Folk dancing, Polish
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts
Contributors
  • Krakowiak Polish Dancers of Boston

Kraus, Karl

Karl Kraus Papers, 1880-1962 (Bulk: 1930-1962)
2 boxes (1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 470
Image of Karl Krauss
Karl Krauss

Known for his bitingly satirical poetry, plays, and essays, the Austrian writer Karl Kraus was born in what is today Jicin, Czech Republic. At the age of three, Kraus and his family moved to Vienna, where he remained for the rest of his life. He is best known as editor of the literary journal Die Fackel (The Torch), which he founded in 1899 and to which he was the sole contributor from 1911 until his death in 1936.

Gabriel Rosenrauch, a lawyer from Chernivtsi, Ukraine, collected materials about Kraus and his career, including newspaper articles and essays in German, Yiddish, Hebrew, English, and French written between 1914 and 1962. A few of these were written by well-known authors such as Hermann Hesse and Werner Kraft. The collection features personal photographs of Kraus from throughout his life, as well as photographs of his apartment in Vienna. Also of note are the indexes to Kraus’ journal Die Fackel that were composed by Rosenrauch, whose personal correspondence with Kraus archivist Helene Kann is part of the collection.

Language(s): German
Subjects
  • Kokoschka, Oskar, 1886-1980
  • Kraft, Werner, 1896-1991
  • Vienna (Austria)--History--20th century
  • World War, 1939-1945
Contributors
  • Kraus, Karl, 1874-1936
  • Rosenrauch, Gabriel
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Lauman, Mary W.

Mary W. Lauman Papers, 1944-1945
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 534

Mary W. Lauman, a 1937 graduate of Cornell University, served in the United States Marine Corps from March 1944 through December 1945. During her 10 months of active duty, Mary wrote numerous letters to her mother detailing her everyday life from boot camp in Lejeune, North Carolina, to her work with the United States Army Personnel Department.

The Lauman letters contain interesting insights into the life of a woman Marine during World War II, including behavior, dress, and social interactions.

Subjects
  • Camp Lejeune (N.C.)
  • Women marines
  • World War, 1939-1945--Women
Contributors
  • Lauman, Mary W

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