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Denslow, William Wallace, 1826-1868

William Wallace Denslow Botanical Manuscripts Collection
1864-1868
1 box (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 064

A druggist by training, William Denslow became interested in botany as a means of combating tuberculosis through outdoor exercise. As his interests developed, Denslow amassed an herbarium that included between 11,000 and 15,000 specimens, including both American and European species.

The Denslow collection consists of a single volume of manuscripts, chiefly letters, collected from significant botanists and other individuals, including William Henry Brewer, Mordecai Cubitt Cooke, Asa Gray, Isaac Hollister Hall, Thomas P. James, Horace Mann, Edward Sylvester Morse, Charles Horton Peck, George Edward Post, Frederick Ward Putnam, George Thurber, and John Torrey.

Subjects
  • Botanists--Correspondence
  • Botany--History--19th century--Sources
Contributors
  • Brewer, William Henry, 1828-1910
  • Cooke, M. C. (Mordecai Cubitt), b. 1825
  • Denslow, William Wallace, 1826-1868
  • Gray, Asa, 1810-1888
  • Hall, Isaac H. (Isaac Hollister), 1837-1896
  • James, Thomas Potts, 1803-1882
  • Mann, Horace, 1844-1868
  • Morse, Edward Sylvester, 1838-1925
  • Peck, Charles H. (Charles Horton), 1833-1917
  • Post, George E. (George Edward), 1838-1909
  • Putnam, F. W. (Frederic Ward), 1839-1915
  • Thurber, George, 1821-1890
  • Torrey, John, 1796-1873
Types of material
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Dickinson, Walter Mason, 1856-1898

Walter Mason Dickinson Papers
1858-1900
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 173
Image of Walter Mason Dickinson, ca.1880
Walter Mason Dickinson, ca.1880

Originally a member of the Massachusetts Agricultural College Class of 1876, Walter Mason Dickinson left after his junior year to enter the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. During his military career, Dickinson saw service in the southwest and as a military instructor at MAC (1891-1896). As a Captain and Quartermaster in the 17th Infantry, he was called to active duty during the Spanish-American War and was killed in action at the Battle of El Caney. He was the first man associated with MAC to die in military service.

This small collection of photographs and letters centers on the death and family of Walter M. Dickinson, the first person associated with Massachusetts Agricultural College to die in combat. In addition to two of the last letters he wrote as he was heading off to war in Cuba, the collection contains three formal portraits of Dickinson at different points in his military career, images of his wife and family, and two images of the scene of his death at El Caney and one of his temporary grave.

Gift of Alex Kingsbury, Jan. 2016
Subjects
  • Dickinson, Asa Williams--Photographs
  • Dickinson, Charles--Photographs
  • Dickinson, Marquis F. (Marquis Fayette), 1814-1901--Photographs
  • Dickinson, Marquis F. (Marquis Fayette), 1840-19215--Photographs
  • Dickinson, Martha E.--Photographs
  • Dickinson, Walter Mason, 1856-1898--Photographs
  • Dwellings--Massachusetts--Amherst--Photographs
  • El Caney (Cuba)--Photographs
  • Farms--Massachusetts--Amherst--Photographs
  • Soldiers' bodies, Disposition of--Cuba--Photographs
  • Soldiers--United States--Photographs
  • Spanish-American War, 1898
Types of material
  • Ambrotypes
  • Correspondence
  • Photographs

Du Bois Fellowship Recipients

2016

John Hyland (English, University of Buffalo and Haverford College)
“The forest of melody: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Sounding of the Environment”
Nicholas T. Rinehart (English, Harvard University)
“‘These illegitimate children of my thought’: The dramatic work and criticism of W.E.B Du Bois”

2015

Nneka Dennie (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Male Feminism and the Evolution of Du Boisian Thought, 1903-1920”
Crystal Webster (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“‘The Transfiguring Soul of Childhood’: Du Bois and the Social, Political, and Cultural Role of Black Children”

2014

Brandon Byrd (Assistant Professor of History, Mississippi State University and University of North Carolina)
“The Problem of Haiti as it Stands Today:” W.E.B. Du Bois on the U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934″
Donald Geesling (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Song and the Talented Tenth: The Musical Imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois, 1902-1942”

2013

Horace D. Ballard Jr. (Public Humanities, History of Art, and American Studies, Brown University)
“Ethics and Aesthetics: Citizenship and Form”
Emahunn Raheem Ali Campbell (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“W.E.B. Du Bois’s Literary Interventions on Black Criminality”
Daniel Chard (History, UMass Amherst)
Exploring the history of ’60s-’70s radical groups allows Chard to investigate the origins of the first police institutions in the U.S. dedicated to domestic “counter-terrorism”

2012

J. Anthony Guillory (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“The Physical Uplift of Race”
Desmond Jagmohan (Government, Cornell)
“Creating Community, Cultivating Citizens, and Interrogating Jim Crow: The Political Thought of Booker T. Washington”

2011

Markeysha Davis (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Daring propaganda for the beauty of the Human Mind’:
Redefinition and Reaffirmation of the New Black Self in Poetry and Drama of the 1960s and 1970s”
Ricky Fayne (English, Northwestern)
“‘The Shadow of a Mighty Negro Past’: Du Bois and the Re-memory of Africa in to the Black America”

Easton (Mass.)

Easton (Mass.) Physician's Daybook
1831-1833
1 vol. (0.15 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 283 bd

The Bristol County, Massachusetts, towns of Easton and Norton had only a small number of trained physicians in the antebellum period tending to a growing population. During the 1830s, that number was probably less and ten, including those with allopathic medical degrees, alternative practitioners, and those who had irregular educations.

The unidentified physician who kept this daybook appears to have practiced in either Easton or Norton, Massachusetts, during the early 1830s. The daybook includes brief records of patient names and dates of visits, medical care dispensed, and minimal records of medical procedures.

Acquired from Charles Apfelbaum, 1989
Subjects
  • Physicians--Massachusetts
Types of material
  • Daybooks

Faber, William A.

William A. Faber Ledger
1848-1853
1 vol. (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 244 bd

Owner of a livery stable in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Includes lists of stabler activities, customers (individuals and businesses), and employed ostlers. Also contains method of payment (cash and services), and one labor account for Fred Berry, a nineteen year old Afro-American who was one of three ostlers living in Faber’s household at the time.

Acquired from Charles Apfelbaum, 1987
Subjects
  • African Americans--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Berry, Fred
  • Burghardt, Thomas, b. 1790
  • Cab and omnibus service--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Coaching (Transportation)--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Crane, Albert S
  • Girling and Doolittle
  • Granger and Hill
  • Great Barrington (Mass. : Town)--Economic conditions
  • Ives, George
  • Pynchon, George
  • Rose Cottage Seminary (Great Barrington, Mass.)
  • Stables--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
Contributors
  • Faber, William A., b. 1818
Types of material
  • Account books

Fernald, Henry T.

Henry T. Fernald Papers
1881-1955
3 boxes (1.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 060
Image of Henry T. Fernald
Henry T. Fernald

Henry T. Fernald received his doctorate in Zoology from Johns Hopkins University in 1890, and after nine years on faculty at the Pennsylvania State College, he joined his father on the faculty of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Like his father, Henry Fernald was an industrious and avid entomologist, and together the two expanded both the undergraduate and graduate curriculum in entomology. In addition to serving as Head of the Department of Entomology, Fernald followed his father as Director of the Graduate School at Massachusetts Agricultural College (1927-1930). A specialist in economic entomology and the systematics of the Hemiptera and Hymenoptera, Fernald also served as President of the Association of Economic Entomologists (1914).

Correspondence with colleagues, College administrators, including President Lewis, and alumni; biographical materials, news clippings and published writings.

Subjects
  • Agriculture--Study and teaching
  • Entomology
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Zoology
Contributors
  • Fernald, Henry T.
  • Lewis, Edward M

Foucher, Lynnette E.

Lynnette E. Foucher Cookbook Collection
1902-2000
429 items (8 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 684
Image of 1929 cookbook
1929 cookbook

Assembled by Lynnette E. Foucher, this collection consists chiefly of cookbooks produced by food companies between the 1920s-1970s. These cookbooks reflect the changing role of women in the home as well as new food trends and innovative technology. Taken together, the collection offers a glimpse into the way meal preparation changed in the U.S. during the second half of the twentieth century and how this change transformed the way we eat today.

Subjects
  • Convenience foods--United States--History--20th century
  • Cooking, American--History--20th century
  • Cooking--Social aspects
  • Diet--United States--History
  • Food--Social aspects
  • Women consumers--United States--History
  • Women in advertising--United States--History
Contributors
  • Foucher, Lynette E
Types of material
  • Cookbooks

Gage, G. Edward

G. Edward Gage Papers
1912-1937
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 131
Image of Edward Gage, photo by Frank A. Waugh, 1927
Edward Gage, photo by Frank A. Waugh, 1927

Recruited to Massachusetts Agricultural College by Lyman Butterfield in 1912, George Edward Gage helped build several scientific departments at the college. Born in Springfield, Mass., on the last day of the year 1884, Gage received his doctorate at Yale in 1909, and served at various points as head of Animal Pathology, Veterinary Science, and Physiology and Bacteriology. He died unexpectedly in March 1948 at the age of 64.

A slender collection, the Gage papers contain seven offprints of Gage’s articles on poultry diseases (1912-1922) and an impressively thorough set of notes taken by MSC student Roy H. Moult in Gage’s Physiology 75 class, 1936-1937.

Subjects
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts State College. Department of Bacteriology and Physiology
  • Physiology--Study and teaching
  • Poultry--Diseases
Contributors
  • Gage, G. Edward
  • Moult, Roy H

Glow, Lewis L.

Lewis L. Glow Photograph Album
1936-1939
1 photograph album (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: RG 050 G53
Image of Lewis L. Glow, May 1939
Lewis L. Glow, May 1939

Born in East Pepperell, Mass., on May 1, 1916, the son of Edward and Angela Glow, Lewis Lyman Glow studied chemistry at Massachusetts State College during the latter years of the Great Depression. Graduating with the class of 1939, Glow continued his studies at Norwich University before serving aboard the USS New Jersey during the Second World War and Korean conflict. Glow died in East Pepperell on Sept. 23, 1986.

A well-labeled, thorough, and thoroughly personal photograph album, this documents the four years spent at Mass. State College. In addition to numerous images of Glow’s classmates and friends, his rooms at the Colonial Inn, beer parties and student highjinks such as the annual rope pull and horticultural show, the album includes numerous images of the cattle barn fire of September 1937 and the extensive damage to the MSC campus and surrounding town from the Hurricane of 1938.

Subjects
  • Fires--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Massachusetts State College--Students
  • New England Hurricane, 1938
Contributors
  • Glow, Lewis L.
Types of material
  • Photographs

Greenwich (Mass.)

Greenwich (Mass.) Collection
1734-1940
3 folders (plus digital) (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 011

Granted in 1737 and incorporated in 1754, Greenwich, Mass., was the first town in the Swift River Valley settled by Europeans. Sitting astride the East and Middle branches of the Swift River and forming the eastern boundary of Hampshire County, Greenwich was primarily an agricultural town with light manufacturing and, beginning in the later nineteenth century, an active tourist trade. The town’s population peaked at over 1,100 early in the nineteenth century, declining slowly thereafter.

The records of Greenwich, Mass., offer a long perspective on the history of the region inundated to create the Quabbin Reservoir. The core of this collection consists of the records of town meetings and the Selectmen of Greenwich from the Proprietary period in the 1730s through disincorporation in 1938, but there is some documentation of the town’s Congregational Church, a local school, the library, and the Greenwich Improvement Society. This finding aid reflects both materials held by SCUA and materials digitized in partnership with the Swift River Valley Historical Society in New Salem, Mass.

Subjects
  • Congregational churches--Massachusetts--Greenwich--History
  • Education--Massachusetts--Greenwich--History
  • Fires--Massachusetts--Greenwich--Histor
  • Greenwich (Mass.)--History
  • Greenwich (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Greenwich (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
  • Greenwich (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Libraries--Massachusetts--Greenwich
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--Social life and customs
Contributors
  • Greenwich (Mass. : Town)
  • Greenwich (Mass. : Town). School Committee
  • Greenwich (Mass. : Town). Treasurer
  • Greenwich Improvement Society
Types of material
  • Account books
  • Church records
  • Photographs

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