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Holland, W. L. (William Lancelot), 1907-

W. L. Holland Papers

1922-2008
4 boxes 5.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 782
Image of W.L. Holland, 1938
W.L. Holland, 1938

Born in New Zealand in 1907, Bill Holland first traveled to Japan at the age of 21 to take part in the conference of the Institute of Pacific Relations, beginning over thirty years of association with the organization. During his time at IPR, Holland held a number of leadership positions, including Research Secretary (1933-1944), Secretary-General (1946-1960), and editor of its periodicals Far Eastern Survey and Pacific Affairs. He took leave from the IPR twice: to study for a MA in economics under John Maynard Keynes at Cambridge (1934) and, during the Second World War, to become acting director of the Office of War Information in Chungking, China. Founded on an internationalist philosophy as a forum to discuss relations between Pacific nations, the IPR was targeted under the McCarthy-era McCarran act during the 1950s, accused of Communist sympathies. After political pressure led the IPR to disband in 1960, Holland accepted a position on faculty with the newly created Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia (1961-1972), helping to lead that department to international prominence. He remained in BC until the death of his wife Doreen in 1990, after which he settled in Amherst to live with his only child, Patricia G. Holland. Holland died in Amherst in May 2008.

The Holland Papers are a dense assemblage of correspondence of Bill Holland, his wife Doreen, and their family, from his first trip abroad in the 1920s through the time of his death. Although largely personal in nature, the letters offer important insight into Holland’s travel in pre-war Asia, his work with the IPR, the war, and the of the 1950s. The collection also includes a wealth of photographs, including two albums documenting trips to Japan, China, and elsewhere 1929-1933.

Subjects

  • China--Description and travel
  • Japan--Description and travel
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Holland, Doreen P.
  • Institute of Pacific Relations

Types of material

  • Photographs
Jose, Colin

Colin Jose Soccer Collection

1910-2010
11 boxes 21 linear feet
Call no.: MS 811
Image of Colin Jose
Colin Jose

One of the most respected historians of soccer in North America, Colin Jose was the official historian at the National Soccer Hall of Fame from 1997-2007 and subsequently at The Soccer Hall of Fame in Vaughan, Ontario. Born in England and a resident of London, Ontario, Jose has been a scrupulous researcher in the sport’s history for over four decades, doing research in an area in which documentation is often sparse. His nine books include The Encyclopedia of American Soccer History (written with Roger Allaway and David Litterer), two books on the North American Soccer League, and works on the early American Soccer League, soccer in Canada, and the history of the U.S. in the World Cup. The US Soccer Federation gives out an annual media award named in Jose’s honor.

The Jose collection contains a wealth of material documenting the history of North American soccer from the early 20th century to the present. The heart of the collection consists of an extensive series of books, magazines, and newspapers on the sport, including fine runs of Soccer News from the 1950s and photocopies of the ASL News (1930s-1960s). The collection also includes correspondence and promotional materials from the Soccer Hall of Fame, a variety of league and team media guides, game programs from various leagues (NASL, International Soccer League, 1960s-1990s), press releases from various teams (particularly from the Washington Darts in the 1960s-1970s), biographical files on players and coaches from the 1920s-1950s (approx 50 files), and research files on soccer in the Olympics, World Cup, USSF, ASL, and NASL. Most of the material from prior to 1960 is supplied in photocopy.

Subjects

  • Soccer--History

Contributors

  • International Soccer League
  • North American Soccer League
Josephs, Stephen

Stephen Josephs Photograph Collection

1972-1978
13 images
Call no.: PH 013
Image of Stephen Josephs
Stephen Josephs

The Guru Ram Das Ashram was founded in Montague, Massachusetts, in 1972 by Steve Josephs under the inspiration of Yogi Bhajan. Affiliated with the 3HO (Healthy Happy Holy Organization) and the Sikh Dharma Brotherhood, the ashram provided instruction in Kundalini Yoga and Tantric meditation, and at one point, there were as many as 21 residents of the house. Yogi Bhajan married Josephs and his wife Alice in an arranged marriage in 1972, and the couple (then called Gurushabd Singh and Gurushabd Kaur) left the ashram in 1983.

The Josephs Collection includes 13 digital images depicting the Montague ashram and its residents. The collection includes images of Yogi Bhajan and the Josephs.

Subjects

  • Ashrams--Massachusetts
  • Guru Ramdas Ashram (Montague, Mass.)
  • Josephs, Stephen
  • Montague (Mass.)--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photographs
Judice, Edward

Edward Judice Photograph Collection

1973-2010
281 digital images, 2 videos
Call no.: PH 046
Image of Lathe operator, Rodney Hunt co., 1974
Lathe operator, Rodney Hunt co., 1974

Raised on Long Island, Ed Judice embarked on a path in photography at the age of 13 when he took a job sweeping floors in a local photo studio. After picking up work photographing locally and a stint in the army, he moved to New York city, Judice began doing commercial work for ad agencies and magazines and eventually with Polaroid. Through Polaroid, he began developing contacts in western Massachusetts, eventually moving to Wendell in the early 1970s. He maintains an active studio in Northampton.

The Judice collection consists of a series of 59 digital images relating to a photo documentation project at the Rodney Hunt factory in Orange, Mass., in 1973 and 1974; a series of photographs documenting the bicentennial of Wendell in 1981; and two video documentaries of the Three County Fair, Northampton, Mass., 2007, and “Benny and Joe: A friendship,” 2010.

Subjects

  • Foundry workers--Massachusetts--Orange
  • Northampton (Mass.)
  • Rodney Hunt Company
  • Serrazina, Joe
  • Shoemakers--Massachusetts--Northampton
  • Shu-Fix (Northampton, Mass.)
  • Strojny, Benny.
  • Wendell (Mass.)--Centennial celebrations, etc.

Contributors

  • Judice, Edward

Types of material

  • Digital images
  • Video recordings
Langland, Joseph

Joseph Langland Papers

1939-2007
6 boxes 5.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 181
Joseph Langland with his wife, Judith
Joseph Langland with his wife, Judith

The poet Joseph Langland was raised on the family farm in northeastern Iowa, and earned both a BA (1940) and MA (1941) from the famed writing program at the University of Iowa, before being inducted into the military service during the Second World War. While still in Germany serving with the Allied military government, Langland had printed for his family his first book of poetry, a chapbook titled For Harold (1945), for his younger brother who had been killed in action in the Philippines. Returning home, he taught part-time at Iowa, then joined the faculty at the University of Wyoming (1948-1959), and finally UMass Amherst. Part of a wave of energetic young writers and scholars to arrive on campus, Langland became active in the early years of the Massachusetts Review and became founder the university’s MFA Program for Poets and Writers. A prolific writer, he contributed regularly to literary magazines and was author of The Green Town (1956), The Wheel of Summer (1963), The Sacrifice Poems (1975), Any Body’s Song (1980), and Selected Poems (1991). Langland was recipient of the National Council of the Arts Award, the Melville Cane Award, the Amy Lowell Traveling Poetry Fellowship, and a Ford Faculty Fellowship, among other honors. After his retirement from UMass in 1979, he served as emeritus until his death in 2007.

The Langland Papers include a substantial number of original manuscripts of poetry, many unpublished, correspondence with major poets, and an extensive run of Langland’s letters written home to his wife and family during the war. Other Langland Papers are housed at Luther College in Iowa.

Gift of David Langland and Elizabeth Langland, 2016

Subjects

  • Poets--Massachusetts
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
  • World War, 1939-1945

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Manuscripts
  • Photographs
Restrictions: Copyright retained by the family
Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920

Benjamin Smith Lyman Papers

1831-1921
52 boxes 42 linear feet
Call no.: MS 190
Image of Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902
Benjamin Smith Lyman, 1902

A native of Northampton, Massachusetts, Benjamin Smith Lyman was a prominent geologist and mining engineer. At the request of the Meiji government in Japan, Lyman helped introduce modern geological surveying and mining techniques during the 1870s and 1880s, and his papers from that period illuminate aspects of late nineteenth century Japan, New England, and Pennsylvania, as well as the fields of geology and mining exploration and engineering. From his earliest financial records kept as a student at Phillips Exeter Academy through the journal notations of his later days in Philadelphia, Lyman’s meticulous record-keeping provides much detail about his life and work. Correspondents include his classmate, Franklin B. Sanborn, a friend of the Concord Transcendentalists and an active social reformer, abolitionist, and editor.

The papers, 1848-1911, have been organized into nine series: correspondence, financial records, writings, survey notebooks, survey maps, photographs, student notes and notebooks, collections, and miscellaneous (total 25 linear feet). A separate Lyman collection includes over 2,000 books in Japanese and Chinese acquired by Lyman, and in Western languages pertaining to Asia.

Language(s): EnglishJapanese

Subjects

  • Geological surveys--Alabama
  • Geological surveys--Illinois
  • Geological surveys--India--Punjab
  • Geological surveys--Japan
  • Geological surveys--Japan--Maps
  • Geological surveys--Maryland
  • Geological surveys--Nova Scotia
  • Geological surveys--Pennsylvania
  • Geological surveys--Pennsylvania--Maps
  • Geologists--United States
  • Geology--Equipment and supplies--Catalogs
  • Geology--Japan--History--19th century
  • Japan--Description and travel--19th century
  • Japan--Maps
  • Japan--Photographs
  • Japan--Social life and customs--1868-1912
  • Mining engineering--Equipment and supplies--Catalogs
  • Mining engineering--Japan--History--19th century
  • Mining engineers--United States

Contributors

  • Lyman, Benjamin Smith, 1835-1920
  • Sanborn, F. B. (Franklin Benjamin), 1831-1917

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Book jackets
  • Field notes
  • Letterpress copybooks
  • Maps
  • Notebooks
  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Trade catalogs
Maki, John M. (John McGilvrey), 1909-

John M. Maki Papers

1887-2005 Bulk: 1940-1990
14 boxes 21 linear feet
Call no.: FS 120
Image of Jack Maki, ca.1983
Jack Maki, ca.1983

Born to Japanese parents in Tacoma, Washington, in 1909, John Maki was adopted as an infant by a white couple and raised on their farm. After receiving both his bachelors (1932) and masters (1936) in English literature at the University of Washington, Maki was persuaded to switch fields to the study of Japan. Following a fellowship from the Japanese government to study in Tokyo in the late 1930s, the war interrupted his plans. After being ordered to internment, he served with the Foreign Broadcast Intelligence Service of the Federal Communications Commission and in psychological warfare planning with the Office of War Information, and after the war, he took a position with the occupation authority, assisting in the drafting of the Japanese Constitution. Returning stateside, he resumed his academic career, earning his doctorate in political science at Harvard in 1948. After eighteen years on the faculty at the University of Washington, Maki moved to UMass in 1966, where he served as chair of the Asian Studies Program and in administrative posts, including as vice dean of the College of Arts and Sciences. In recognition of his efforts to promote relations between the U.S. and Japan, he was awarded the Third Class Order of the Sacred Treasure by the emperor of Japan in 1983. Although he retired from the faculty in 1980, Maki remained active as a scholar until the time of his death in Amherst in December 2006.

The Maki Papers reflect a long career in the study of contemporary Japanese politics and culture. Beginning with his earliest academic work on Japan in the 1930s, the collection documents the range of Maki’s interests, from the origins of Japanese militarism and nationalism to the development of the post-war Constitution and his later studies of William Smith Clark and the long history of Japanese-American relations. The collection includes valuable documents from the early period of the Allied Occupation, including the extensive correspondence with his wife Mary (1946).

Subjects

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Constitutional law--Japan
  • Japan--History--Allied occupation, 1945-1952
  • Japan--Politics and government--20th century
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Political Science

Contributors

  • Maki, John M. (John McGilvrey), 1909-
Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-

William Manchester Papers

1941-1988
4 boxes 1.75 linear feet
Call no.: MS 433

William Manchester was a journalist, educator, and author, best known for his biographies of President John F. Kennedy, Douglas MacArthur and Winston Churchill. This collection consists primarily of letters from Manchester to his mother written during his service with the 29th Marines in World War II. Manchester later described his war-time experiences in a memoir entitled Goodbye, Darkness.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts State College--Students
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Manchester, William Raymond, 1922-

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)
Mange, Arthur P.

Arthur P. Mange Photograph Collection

1965-2010
3 boxes 4.5 linear feet
Call no.: PH 044
Image of Fern fronds
Fern fronds

Arthur P. Mange taught in the Biology Department at University of Massachusetts Amherst for 31 years before retiring in 1995. A co-author of numerous works in human genetics, Mange served on the chair of the Conservation Committee in Amherst, and currently serves on the Burnett Gallery Committee. In 1983, his New England images were featured in Across the Valley (from Cummington to New Salem) held at the Burnett Gallery. This exhibition was followed at the Hitchcock Center in 1984 with Delight in Familiar Forms (celebrating some well-known plants and animals), with Ring Bell to Admit Bird at the Jones Library and Net Prophet at Cooley Dickinson Hospital. Architectural Sights — Big and Small, Mange’s most recent show (2002), appeared at the Burnett Gallery. In addition to exhibitions, Mange has also donated collections for fund-raising auctions at New York University, the Cooley Dickinson Hospital, the University of Massachusetts Fine Arts Center, the Amherst Historical Society, Jones Library, and the Amherst Community Arts Center.

His photographic collection spans more than half a century of subjects reflecting his varied interests in animals, plants, our region, gravestones, what he calls “whimsical signs,” and attention-grabbing shadows.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • Cemeteries--Pictorial works
  • Hadley (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • New England--Pictorial works
  • New Salem (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • New York (N.Y.)--Pictorial works

Types of material

  • Photographs
Marshall, Perry

Perry Marshall Papers

1902-1929
1 box 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 493

A minister, published poet, and physician from New Salem, Massachusetts, Perry Marshall carried on a lively correspondence with Dorothy Bullard, also from New Salem, from 1927 until 1929.

Although personal in nature, Marshall’s letters are not romantic, but are written from the perspective of an older gentleman who late in life has come to admire, and perhaps adore, a young woman. Bullard, a lively and thoughtful young woman, clearly returns the admiration, if not the affection. The collection also includes several of Marshall’s published works.

Subjects

  • New Salem (Mass.)--History
  • Poets--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Bullard, Dorothy
  • Marshall, Perry

Types of material

  • Poems