Results for: “Constitutional history--United States--Congresses” (632 collections)SCUA

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Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Clarke School for the Deaf

Clarke School for the Deaf Records, ca.1867-2010.

130 boxes (195 linear feet linear feet).
Call no.: MS 742

With a $50,000 grant from the philanthropist John Clarke, Gardiner Green Hubbard founded the Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes in 1867, a school predicated on the importance of acquiring oral skills for children with hearing loss. Opened in Northampton, Mass., under the direction of Harriet B. Rogers, Clarke differed philosophically from schools such as the American School for the Deaf, where sign language was used for instruction, by stressing speech-reading and speech as the primary methods of communication. With notable supporters such as Alexander Graham Bell, Clarence W. Barron, and Calvin Coolidge and his wife Grace (a former teacher), the school became a pioneer in training teachers in auditory and oral methods and in recognizing the importance of early intervention and mainstreaming children into neighborhood schools. Working in partnership with Smith College, Clarke began offering a master’s degree in Education of the Deaf in 1962. Known as the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech since 2010, the school has opened additional campuses in Boston (1995), Jacksonville (1996), New York (1999), and Philadelphia (2001).

The records of the Clarke School offer rich documentation of the history of oral deaf education in the United States and insight into the experience of deafness in America. The collection includes extensive correspondence of school administrators and teachers, organizational materials, records of the school’s programs, and an essentially complete run of the school’s annual reports and other publications. An extensive set of genealogical and genetic records generated by the research staff at the school is restricted for 75 years from the date of creation.

Subjects

  • Deaf--Education
  • Deafness--Genetic aspects
  • Teachers of the deaf

Contributors

  • Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf
  • Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922
  • Coolidge, Grace Goodhue, 1879-1957

Types of material

  • Minutes (Administrative records)
  • Photographs

Collection policy

Frank Waugh's doves
Garden (white fan tailed doves in bird bath) by Frank Waugh, ca.1920

“… there must come vast social change in the United States; a change not violent, but by the will of the people certain and inexorable; carried out ‘with malice toward none but charity for all’; with meticulous justice to the rich and complete sympathy for the poor, the sick and the ignorant; with freedom and democracy for America, and on earth Peace, Good Will toward men.”

W.E.B. Du Bois, Chicago, June 29, 1951

In keeping with our mission, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects materials of enduring historical and cultural value relating to four major thematic areas: the history and experience of social change in America; the histories and cultures of New England with an emphasis on Massachusetts; innovation and entrepreneurship; and the broad community associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Our collections are tightly integrated and span all formats, including personal papers and organizational records, books and periodicals, maps, photographs, audio and video recordings, and digital materials of all kinds, and they currently include over 35,000 printed items, approximately 30,000 linear feet of manuscript and archival materials, tens of thousands of photographs, and a burgeoning array of digital assets.

While not comprehensive, the following includes a brief synopsis of some of the primary focal points for SCUA’s collections:

Our approach to collecting

Following in the footsteps of W.E.B. Du Bois, we recognize the inherent interconnectedness of a broad range of issues in social justice and collect original materials that document the organizational, intellectual, and individual ties that unite disparate struggles for social equality, human dignity, and justice. In adopting social change as a primary collecting focus, we hope to move beyond viewing social and political movements in isolation and toward a vision that acknowledges the connections between and among them. Ultimately, we wish to lay a foundation for examining the larger histories of social engagement in America and the broader experience of social change that is difficult to encapsulate within a single social movement.

A distinctive feature of SCUA’s approach to collecting is our effort to include “whole lives and whole communities,” to provide a robust basis for interpreting the background of the persons and organizations we document, their influences, interests, and the communities in which they operate.

Social change

Emphasizing the cross-fertilization between several social movements and centers of activist energy, including peace, social and racial justice, agricultural reform, environmentalism, sustainability, labor activism, gay activism, antinuclear activism, and intentional communities, but branching out to include antifluoridation activism, campaigns for voting rights and clean elections, community and charitable organizations, and the history of revolutionary-era Europe (1789-1848).

  • African and African American history and culture: The history of race and ethnicity in America, with particular emphasis on the struggle for racial equality and social justice.
  • Agriculture, horticulture, botany: Including agricultural science and practice, horticulture, animal husbandry, natural history, organic farming, sustainable living, and heritage breeds.
  • Antinuclear movement: SCUA holds numerous collections documenting grassroots opposition to nuclear power and nuclear weaponry.
  • Arts management and arts administration:
    In partnership with the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts, and several other arts agencies, SCUA documents the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state and national arts agencies, we will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.
  • Cold War Culture: The culture of the Cold War, with an emphasis upon East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. Among other areas, SCUA has a strong interest in the Solidarity movement and in partnership with the DEFA Film Library, in East German cinema and graphic arts.
  • Disability: Organizational records and collections of personal papers documenting the history of disability and disability rights in the United States.
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender issues: Materials relating to the history and experience of the LGBTQ community and liberation struggles.
  • Labor, work, and industry: Organized labor, industrialization, manufacturing, business history, and the experience and culture of labor and working people.
  • Peace: Materials relating to the peace and antiwar movements and non-violence, with an emphasis on New England.
Innovation and entrepreneurship

Materials that document innovative and entrepreneurial activities, and particularly social entrepreneurship. The collections in SCUA include the papers of Mark H. McCormack (a pioneer in sport and entertainment marketing), Carl C. Harris (inventor and President of Rodney Hunt Co.), and numerous collections that document our region’s distinctive history of innovation in manufacturing and technology.

New England history and culture

The social, political, cultural, intellectual, literary, and economic life, with an emphasis upon western New England. The department houses thousands of books on New England cookery, with a particular emphasis on charitable and community cookbooks and cookbooks and ephemera published by corporations and the food industry.

  • Cookery and culinary history
    SCUA has thousands of cookbooks and other materials on New England regional cuisine, including community and charitable cookbooks, commercial cookbooks by New England authors, corporate cookbooks, and culinary ephemera.
  • Literature and the arts
    Emphasizing poets and writers, playwrights, and the performing arts in New England.
  • Politics and political culture
    SCUA has rich collections documenting the history and politics of the Commonwealth, including the papers of Congressmen Silvio O. Conte and John Olver, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, and State rep John Clark and the records of the Hampshire Council of Governments and several individual towns.
University Archives interests

Serving as the memory of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University Archives collects, preserves, and makes available official and non-official records documenting the policies, programs, facilities, and activities of the campus community, including its administration, departments and programs, faculty, and staff. The Archives also avidly collects materials that reflect the lives and experiences of its students and alumni.

SCUA makes an effort to document the histories of the entire UMass community. Our holdings include the comprehensive official records of the University since its founding in 1863, papers of faculty, staff, and students, official and unofficial publications, oral histories, and a wide range of other collections that reflect on our history as the Commonwealth’s land grant institution.

Other areas

SCUA has developed depth in a handful of other collecting areas, including:

  • American Study of Japan and Asia
    American relations with Japan from the Meiji period to the present, and connections with China and other Asian countries.
  • Protistology
    Records of the scholarly study of the protista (protozoans).

Concordance for the Archives, U

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

U

UAASC
see Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- ) RG-6/7
UALRC
see United Asia Learning Resource Center RG-25/U5
U-ARTS
see Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) RG-45/40/U5
UCC
see Computer Center RG-29
UCF
see United Christian Foundation (UCF) RG-30/12
UCS
see Computer Center RG-29
UCS Notes (Computer Center Publication) (1990)
RG-29/00/4
UES
see University of El Salvador (UES) RG-60/3
UFF
see University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- ) RG-50/7/1
UIS Newsletter (Data Processing Center) (1987- )
RG-35/7
UMAGRAFFITI (Student Publication)
RG-45/00/U4
UMass (News Office) (1983-1984)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS (1996- ) (News Office)
RG-5/00/12
see also Massachusetts (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
UMASS (University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service (1982-1989)
RG-25/A6/00
UMASS 1983 and UMASS 1984 (Public Affairs)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS Alumni Connection, The
see Alumni Connection, The UMass (1992-1994) RG-50/00/3
UMass Alumni News and Views (1978-1983)
RG-50/00/3
UMass Amherst Globe, The (International Programs) (1993- )
RG-6/4/9/2
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Answers (Continuing Education) (1982- )
RG-7/00
UMass Around the Globe (1992- )
RG-39/9
UMass Boston
RG-55/3
UMass Boston Planning and Establishment (pre-1965)
RG-55/3/1
UMass Dartmouth
see Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU) RG-55/5
UMass Educational Television (UMET)
RG-13/1/3
UMass Faculty and Staff for Peace and Justice in the Middle East
see Peace and Justice in the Middle East, UMass Faculty and Staff for RG-40/3/P1
UMass Greens (1989)
RG-45/80/U4
UMass Hunger Task Force
see Hunger Task Force, UMass RG-45/40/H8
UMass Information Technology Services (formerly University Information Systems)
RG-35/7
UMass Interaction (1994- )
RG-3/00
UMass Labor Council (1995- )
RG-40/5/U5
UMass Lowell
see University of Lowell RG-55/4
UMass Majors (catalog)
see CASIAC RG-11/5
see also Admissions RG-30/5
UMass News (News Office)
RG-5/3
UMass Nutrient Data Bank
see Food Science and Nutrition, Department of–Nutrient Data Bank, UMass RG-25/F5/3
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Peacemakers
see Peacemakers, UMass (1982-1987) RG-45/80/P4
see also Peacemakers Records (1963-1990) MS309
UMass Plato User’s Group Newsletter
see Massachusetts CAI Consortium Newsletter (1985- ) RG-29/00
UMass Program at Freiburg
see Freiburg, UMass Program at RG-25/F8
U-Mass Tenant Association (UMTA)
RG-35/12/3
UMass Worcester
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
U-Math Newsletter (1981)
RG-25/M5/00
UMET
see UMass Educational Television (UMET) RG-13/1/3
UMPSO
see Pagan Association, UMass RG-45/70/P3
UMTA
see UMass Tenant Association (UMTA) RG-35/12/3
UMTC
see University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (1994- ) RG-25/U4
Undergrad, The (Business Club) (1974-1976)
RG-12/4
Undergraduate Admissions Task Force (1999- )
RG-40/2/U2
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- )
RG-6/7
Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) (1987)
RG-45/40/U5
Undergraduate Course of Study Committee (Faculty Senate, 1960-1963)
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Curriculum Study Committee’s Project (Faculty Senate, 1996- )
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Education, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Undergraduate Education, Associate (1972-1973, 1981- ) RG-6/10
Undergraduate Journal
RG-45/00/U5
Undergraduate Retention Committee (Official University Committee) (1992)
RG-40/2/U4
see also Retention Committee (1985- ) RG-40/2/R5
Unification Church of America (Religious Group) (1981-1984)
RG-45/70/U5
Union, Credit
see Credit Union RG-40/5/C7
Union of Professional Employees
see Union of Professional Employees (UPE) MS-47
Union of Student Employees (1975-1976) RG-45/45/U5

Union Program Council
RG-45/17
Union, Radical Student
see Radical Student Union RG-45/80/R1
Union, Social
see Social Union RG-45/90/S6
Union Video Center (Student Video Project) (1972)
RG-45/30/U5
Unions and Associations
RG-45/45
Unionization, Student
see Student Unionization (Association) RG-45/45/S7
Unions and Associations (Faculty and Staff)
RG-40/5
Unions and Associations (Student Body)
RG-45/45
Unions, Employees
see Unions and Associations RG-40/5
United Asia House (1989)
RG-45/40/U6
see also United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990) RG-25/U5
United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990)
RG-25/U5
see also United Asia House (1989) RG-45/40/U6
United Christian Foundation (UCF)
RG-30/12
United States Student Association (USSA) (1983-1988)
RG-45/80/U5
Universities, State
see Land-Grant Colleges, State Universities RG-60/1
University Advancement
see University Relations and Development RG-39
University Affairs Committee (Faculty Senate, 1965-1972)
RG-40/2/A3
University as a Whole
RG-1
University as a Whole–Publications
RG-1/00
University Bulletin (1973-1977)
RG-5/00/6
see also Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin (1953-1971) and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
University Career Center
see Career Center, University RG-30/9/5
University Center for Community College Affairs
see Higher Education, Center for RG-13/3/19/4
University Center for Economic Development (1977- )
RG-6/4/14/2
see also Economic Development, Center for RG-12/12
University China Committee
see China Committee, University RG-40/2/C4
University Chorale
see Singing Clubs–University Chorale RG-25/M9.5
University College (Official University Committee) (1966-1967)
RG-40/2/U5
University College Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1966)
RG-40/2/A3
University Committee on AIDS
see AIDS, University Committee on RG-40/2/A5.5
University Committee on Alcohol Use
see Alcohol Use, University Committee on (Official University Committee) RG-40/2/A6
University Committees, Official
see Official University Committees RG-40/2/A1-W6
University Community Service Council (1993- )
RG-40/2/U6
University Computer Service Newsletter
see UCS Notes RG-29/00/4
University Computing Center
see Computer Center RG-29
University Computing Services
see Computer Center RG-29
University Conference Services
RG-7/3
University Counsel
RG-4/16
University Day School
see School RG-25/H9
University Democrats (Student Social Action Group) (1989- )
RG-45/80/U6
University Directions
see Handbooks (Student Affairs) RG-30/00/2
University Faculty Senate, ad hoc Committee
see Faculty Senate, University, ad hoc Committee on (Official University Committee) (1955) RG-40/2/F2
University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- )
RG-50/7/1
University Gallery
see Art Gallery RG-11/15
University Guide Service
see ARCON (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
see also University Tour Service (1984- ) RG-30/4/1
University Historical Collection
RG-1/200-299
University History Committee
see History Committee, University (125th Anniversary, 1986-1987) RG-40/2/H5
see also Campus Awareness Committee (1986- ) RG-40/2/C.5
University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988)
RG-1/208
University Honors Program
see Honors Program RG-6/4/11
University Human Subjects Review Committees
RG-9/1/2/1
University Information Systems
see Umass Information Technology Services RG-35/7
University Internship Program
see Internships, Office of (University Internship Program) RG-11/6
University Lectures, Committee on
see Lectures, Committee on University RG-40/2/L1.5
University Magazine
see Massachusetts Magazine (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
University Medal for Outstanding Service (1973)
RG-2/99
see also Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service
see UMASS (Newsletter) (1982-1989) RG-25/A6/00
University Newsletter (News Bureau) (1968-1970)
RG-5/00/2
University Notebook (News Bureau) (1980-1981)
RG-5/3/2
University of El Salvador (UES)
RG-60/3
University of Lowell
RG-55/4
University of Massachusetts Foundation (1950- )
RG-50/7
see also Trustees Council RG-2/4
University of Massachusetts, Future Committee on
see Future University of Massachusetts (Official University Committee) (1970-1971) RG-40/2/F8
University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers, Center for
see Center for University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers RG-25/P7.5
University of Massachusetts Republican Club
see Republican Club, University of Massachusetts (1983- ) RG-45/80/R4
University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (UMTC)
RG-25/U4
University, Officials of the (Photographs)
see Officials of the University (Trustees and Presidents Photographs) RG-110
University Outreach
RG-16
University Outreach, Provost for
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach RG-6/6
University Outreach, Vice Chancellor For
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- ) RG-16/1
University Photo Negatives Collection
RG-171
University Photography Club
see Photographers Association RG-45/40/P5
University Policy
see Vice President for University Policy RG-3/2
University Press (Graduate School)
RG-10/4
see also Research and Graduate Studies RG-9
University Professors, American Association of
see American Association of University Professors (AAUP) RG-40/5/A2
University Relations and Development
RG-39
University Relations and Development Council (Faculty Senate, 1995)
RG-40/2/A3
University Relations and Development–Publications
RG-39/00
University Relations and Development–Vice Chancellor for
see Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
University Relations, Vice President for
see Vice President for University Relations RG-3/14
University Report (President’s Office) (1978-1979)
RG-3/00
University, Secretary of the
see Secretary of the University RG-3/3
University Staff Association (USA)
RG-40/5/U6
see also Massachusetts State Employees Association (MSEA) (prior to 1977) MS-49
University Statistics (USTAT) (1998) (Student Special Interest Group) RG-45/40/U8

University Store
RG-37/5
University Theatre
RG-25/T3.8
University Tour Service (1984- )
RG-30/4/1
see also ARCON (University Guide Service) (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
University Without Walls (UWW) (School of Education)
RG-13/4/2/3
see also Associate Provost for Special Program RG-6
University Without Walls Newsletter (1972-1987)
RG-13/4/2/3
University Women
RG-40/7
University Women’s Network (UWN)
RG-40/5/U7
University Women’s Professional Network (UWPN)
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
University Writing Program
RG-7/11
University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976)
RG-6/4/4
Upbeat (1986-1989)
RG-30/11/1
UPC
see Union Program Council (UPC) RG-45/17
Update (1982-1991)
RG-25/P8/00
UPE
see Union of Professional Employees (MTA) MS-47
Upside Down Club (Religious Group) (1992- ) RG-45/70/U7

Upsilon Pi Epsilon (Honor Society)
RG-45/60/U6
Upward Bound (1966-1993)
RG-6/4/13
see also Upward Bound Committee (Faculty Senate, 1967) RG-40/2/A3
Future Scholars of America (1993- ) RG-6/4/13.5
Upward Bound, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967)
RG-40/2/A3
Urban and Community Forestry, Northeast Center for
see Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry (1996- ) RG-25/N7
Urban Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23/1
USA
see University Staff Association (USA) RG-40/5/U6
USSA
see United States Student Association (USSA) RG-45/80/U5
UVC TV-19 (Student Run Television Station) (1999- )
RG-45/30/U7
UWN
see University Women’s Network (UWN) RG-40/5/U7
UWPN
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
UWW
see University Without Walls (UWW) RG-13/4/2/3
UYA
see University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976) RG-6/4/4

Council for Fair School Finance

Council for Fair School Finance Records, 1977-2005.

8 boxes (12 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 784

The Council for Fair School Finance began its fight in 1978 when it filed a lawsuit (McDuffy v. Secretary of the Executive Office of Education) to require Massachusetts to meet its constitutional obligation to provide a quality education for all schoolchildren. The suit was quickly suspended due to recently enacted school reform legislation. Within five years, the Council took up the suit once more, and again further reform legislation was enacted that prevented the suit from going to trial. Finally in 1993, the case was heard and decided in favor of the plaintiffs; three days later the governor signed the Education Reform Act of 1993. By the end of the decade, the promise of the McDuffy decision had not yet been fully realized and the Council filed a second suit (Hancock v. Commissioner of Education). In April 2004, Superior Judge Margot Botsford issued a report that found the state’s efforts to fix the problems identified in the previous case were insufficient and that the plaintiffs were entitled to remedial relief. The Supreme Judicial Court, however, did not uphold the recommendation and the motion for relief was denied.

The collection consists of administrative records, including documents created early in the Council’s history, minutes of Council meetings, media reports, research materials, and financial records.

Subjects

  • Education--Finance--Massachusetts
  • Educational change--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Council for Fair School Finance

Crouch, Rebecca

Rebecca Crouch Papers, ca.1936-1986.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 602

In the late 1870s, a middle-aged farmer from Richmond, Minnesota, Samuel Crouch, married a woman eleven years his junior and asked her to relocate to the northern plains. Possessed of some solid self-confidence, Rebecca left behind her family a friends and set out to make a life for herself, adjusting to her new role as step-mother and community member, as well as the familiar role of family member at a distance.

The Crouch Papers includes approximately 225 letters offering insight into life in Minnesota during the late 1870s and early 1880s, and into the domestic and social life of a woman entering into a new marriage with an older man. Rebecca’s letters are consumed with the ebb and flow of daily life, her interactions with other residents of the community at church or in town, the weather, and chores from cooking to cleaning, farming, gardening, writing, going to town, or rearranging furniture.

Subjects

  • Farmers--Minnesota
  • Minnesota--Social life and customs--19th century
  • Women--Minnesota

Contributors

  • Crouch, Rebecca
  • Jones, Sarah
  • Loomis, Emma

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Daniel A. Brown Collection Gallery

Michael Metelica
Michael Metelica, 1975

The Brotherhood of the Spirit commune, later renamed the Renaissance Community, was one of the largest communes in the eastern United States during the late 1960s and early 1970s. From the time of its founding in Leyden, Mass., in 1968, through its various moves and incarnations, the community has been well documented photographically. One of the principle photographers during the period 1973-1983, Daniel A. Brown, preserved an archive of hundreds of images that he has allowed SCUA to scan and make available to the public.

The following images are organized in roughly chronological order from the early years of the commune’s founder, Michael Metelica, to his death in 2003. They are broken into four main sections, reflecting the major periods of the commune’s history: the Brotherhood of the Spirit (1968-1973), Metelica Aquarian Concept and Renaissance Community (1973-1978), the 2001 Center/Renaissance Community in Gill (1975-1983), and the reunions and gatherings (1992-2002).

See also:

Delevingne, Lionel

Lionel Delevingne Photograph Collection, ca.1975-1995.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 047
Joan of Seabrook
Joan of Seabrook

Born and raised in France, the photojournalist Lionel Delevingne studied education at l’Ecole Normale in Paris, but settled permanently in the United States in 1975. Based at first in Northampton, Mass., he became a prolific photographer of American social movements while working for the Valley Advocate and other publications, covering the early years of the Clamshell Alliance and the antinuclear movement in considerable depth. His work has been exhibited frequently and published widely in the mainstream and alternative press, including the New York Times, Le Figaro Magazine, Die Zeit, Newsweek, Washington Post Magazine, Mother Jones, and Vanity Fair.

The Delevingne collection includes remarkable visual documentation of the antinuclear movement of the 1970s and beyond, including some of the its most iconic images. Beginning with coverage of the Seabrook occupation, Delevingne covered the movement as it spread throughout the northeastern U.S. and internationally. The collection includes exhibition prints, prints for publication, and digitized images ranging in date from the mid-1970s through 1990s. Copyright in the images has been retained by Delevingne.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--United States
  • Clamshell Alliance
  • Photojournalists
  • Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant (N.H.)

Contributors

  • Delevingne, Lionel

Types of material

  • Photographs

Democratic Socialist Conference

Democratic Socialist Conference Collection, 1984-1991.

2 boxes (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 325

Includes transcripts of papers delivered at conferences (1985-1990) on democratic socialism, and correspondence (1984-1991) between Stephen Siteman, former Executive Secretary of the Socialist Party of America, and Frank Zeidler, former Mayor of Milwaukee, Socialist Party candidate for President of the United States, and national chairperson of the Socialist Party USA.

Subjects

  • Socialism--Africa
  • Socialist Party of the United States of America
  • United States--Politics and government--1981-1989
  • United States--Politics and government--1989-1993

Contributors

  • Siteman, Stephen
  • Zeidler, Frank P

Double Edge Theater

Double Edge Theatre Records, 1970-2002.

28 boxes (15.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 455
Bold Stroke for a Wife
Bold Stroke for a Wife

Since its founding, Double Edge Theatre has embraced a two-fold mission: to develop and promote the highest quality of original theatre performance, and to create a permanent center of performance, practice, training research, and cultural exchange.

The collection documents the Theatre’s focus on research, international collaboration, and the elevation of artistic performance above and beyond stage work into the realm of cultural exchange.

Subjects

  • Experimental theater
  • Theater and society
  • Theatrical companies--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Arnoult, Philip
  • Double Edge Theatre
  • Durand, Carroll
  • Klein, Stacy
  • Odin teatret
  • Staniewski, Wlodzimierz
  • Stowarzyszenie Teatralne "Gardzienice"

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Posters
  • Programs
  1. Pages:
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  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
  6. 5
  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. 9
  11. ...
  12. 64
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