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SCUA

Results for: “Collective labor agreements--Medical personnel --Massachusetts--Boston--History” (150 collections)SCUA

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Carton, Robert J.

Robert J. Carton Papers, 1935-2002 (Bulk: 1983-2002).

(3 boxes linear feet).
Call no.: MS 643

The environmental scientist Robert J. Carton emerged in the mid-1980s as one of the leading scientific critics of fluoridation of the water supply. After receiving his doctorate in Environmental Science from Rutgers University, Carton accepted a position in 1972 with the Office of Toxic Substances in the Environmental Protection Agency, assessing the risks associated with a range of toxic substances from asbestos to arsenic and hexachlorobenzene. By 1985, Carton became concerned about EPA standards for fluoride in drinking water, taking a public stance against undue political influence in framing those standards and insisting that there was no scientific evidence that fluorides prevented tooth decay and that any level of fluoride exposure presented a significant health hazard. In 1992, Carton left the EPA to work for as Chief of Environmental Compliance for the U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command in Fort Detrick, Maryland.

Consisting primarily of research, notes, and some correspondence relating to the health effects of fluoridation of drinking water, the collection documents Robert Carton’s nearly two decade long struggle against the EPA and federal government. Also included are transcripts of filings relating to various legal challenges against fluoridation during the mid-1980s.

Subjects

  • Drinking water--Law and legislation--United States
  • Fluorides--Physiological effect
  • United States. Environmental Protection Agency

Contributors

  • Carton, Robert J

Concordance for the Archives, O

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

O

OAPA
see Office of Academic Planning and Assessment (OAPA) RG-4/3/6
Obituaries, Biographies (Alumni)
RG-50/00/2
see also Health Services–Obituaries (Student) RG-30/15
Occasional Papers Series (International Area Studies)
see Asian Studies Program and Committee RG-25/A8/00
Latin American Studies Program and Committee RG-25/L4/00
Near Eastern Studies Program and Committee RG-25/N4/00
Soviet & East European Studies Program and Committee RG-25/S75/00
Western European Studies Program and Committee RG-25/W3/00
Occupational Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/17/2
Ocean Engineering Program
RG-25/O2
OCHO
see Off Campus Housing Office (OCHO) RG-45/18
OCIS
see Office of Computing & Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- ) RG-6/5/1
Off Campus Housing Office (OCHO)
RG-45/18
Office for Cooperative Education
see Cooperative Education, Office for RG-11/31/1
Office of Academic Planning and Assessment (OAPA)
RG-4/3/6
Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS)
RG-4/3/2
see also V.C. for A. and F. RG-35/1 (records held in RG-4/2-3)
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3.
Office of Computing and Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- )
RG-6/5/1
Office of Economic Development (OED)
RG-4/15
see also Office of Industrial Relations and Regional Development (1987- ) RG-4/10
Office of Grant and Contract Administration
RG-4/4
Office of Human Relations
see Human Relations, Office of RG-4/6
Office of Industrial Relations and Regional Development (1987- )
RG-4/10
see also Office of Economic Development (OED) RG-4/15
Office of Information Technologies (OIT)
see Office of Computing and Information Systems (OCIS) (1988- ) RG-6/5/1
Office of Internships
see Internships, Office of (University Internship Program) RG-11/6
Office of Institutional Research (OIR)
RG-4/3/5
see also Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4.
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP)
RG-4/3/4
see also Executive V.C. and Provost RG-6/1 (records held in RG-4/3/4)
Associate V.C. for Academic Affairs RG-30/1 (records held in RG-4/3/4)
Office of Institutional Studies (OIS) (1960-1969)
RG-4/3/1
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB)
RG-4/3/3
see also Budget Office RG-35/20
Budget Documents RG-4/2
Office of Institution Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Office of Public Information (OPI)
RG-5/3
see also Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
Office of Residential Resource Management (1976- )
RG-30/21/1
see also Residential Academic Programs RG-35/14
Housing Administration RG-32/12
Office of Solid Waste Management (OSWM)
RG-36/10
see also Residential Recycling Program RG- 45/40/R6
Office of Space Management (OSM)
RG-4/14
Office of Teaching Evaluation and Improvement
see Institutional Resources and Improvement, Center for (1973) RG-6/18
Office of the Learning Disabilities Coordinator
see Counseling and Academic Development Center (CADC) (1987) RG-11/8
Office to Coordinate Energy Research and Education
RG-10/5
Official University Committees (Faculty and Staff)
RG-40/2
Official University Faculty/Staff Committees, Other
RG-40/2/A6-Z9
Officials of the University (Photographs)
RG-110
OIP
see Office of Institutional Research (OIP) RG-4/3/5
OIRP
see
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
OIT (Office of Information Technologies)
see Office of Computing and Information Systems RG-6/5/1
Older Students
see Counseling Assistance for Older Students (CAOS) RG-45/40/C4
Olericulture Department
see Plant and Soil Sciences RG-25/P4
Olmsted Drive (Physical Plant) (1939)
RG-36/50/O6
Omega Psi Phi (1985- )
RG-45/90/O6
Ombuds Office (1969- )
RG-4/8
see also Ombudsman (Faculty Senate, 1968- ) RG-40/2/A3
Ombudsman Selection Committee (1975-1976) RG-40/2/O4
Multicultural Conflict Resolution Team (1993- ) RG-4/8/1
Ombudsman Committee (Faculty Senate, 1968-1979)
RG-40/2/A3
see also Ombuds Office (1969- ) RG-4/8
Ombudsman Selection (Official University Committee) (1975-1976)
RG-40/2/O4
see also Ombudsman (Faculty Senate, 1968-1974) RG-40/2/A3
Omicron Delta Epsilon
RG-45/60/O4
Omicron Nu (Honor Society)
RG-45/60/O4.5
On Campus Alumni Group (1986-1989)
RG-40/3/O5
On the Other Hand
see Academic Affairs Committee (Student Senate) RG-45/7/A2
125th Anniversary
see Anniversary, 125th (1988) RG-1/8
see also University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988) RG-1/208
125th Anniversary Slide Show, UMass (1988)
see UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988) RG-187/1
OPB
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Operations Council
RG-30/1/2
Operetta Guild (Films and Videotapes)
RG-186/3
Operetta Guild/Music Theatre Guild
RG-25/M9.4
see also Theatre (Photographs) RG-140/1
Music (Photographs) RG-140/2
Operetta Guild (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/3
Oral History (1974-1982)
RG-1/207
see also Oral Histories (selected) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project)
History Department RG-25/H5
Oratory, Student
see Speaking Contests, Student Oratory RG-25/C7.3
Orchard Hill (Residential Buildings)
RG-36/102/O7
Orchestra (Music and Dance Department)
RG-25/M9.3
Organization Charts (Issued by President’s Office)
RG-3/00/1
Organization Charts of the University
see Bibliography, Organization Charts RG-1/00/1
see also Operating Budget Summary, 1974-1975, etc. RG-3/4/2
OBIS- Facts & Figures 1967, Factbook-1977 RG-4/2
Standard Practice Instruction, 1954, p.2 RG-3/4/1
Proposed Spring 1970, Mass. Gazette, 5/8/1970, P.B. RG-4/1
Business Manager, 9/1/1967- RG-35/3
Annual Reports, bound vols. 1972-73-75-76 RG-1/00/2
Organizational charts issued by President’s Office RG-3/00/1
Organization of the Research Mission, ad hoc Committee (1998- )
RG-40/2/O7
Organizational and Community Development, Center for (COCD)
see Center for Organizational and Community Development (COCD) RG-13/4/3/3
see also Citizen Involvement Training Project (CITP) RG-7/9
Organizations Not Appointed by an Official Unit of the University, Faculty and Staff Committees
see Faculty and Staff Committees and Organizations not appointed by an official unit of the University RG-40/3
Organizations, Student (Photographs)
see Student Organizations (Photographs) RG-140
OSM
see Office of Space Management RG-4/14
OSWM
see Office of Solid Waste Management (OSWM) RG-36/10
Other Voice, The (1980-1984)
RG-30/26/O8
Out Front (Student Publication) (1975-1977)
RG-45/00/O9
Outing Club (1940- )
RG-45/40/O9.5
Outlook
RG-15/12
Outreach (1986-1988)
RG-3/8
Outreach Mobile Unit
RG-30/13
Outreach Programs, Center for (1972-1981)
RG-6/4/8
Outreach, University, Vice Provost for
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach RG-16/1
Outreach, Vice Chancellor for University
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- ) RG-16/1
Overseas Programs & Exchanges, Committee on
see Committee on Overseas Programs & Exchanges (COPE) RG-40/2/C5
Oversize Materials
RG-177 thru RG-184
Oversize Photos
RG-175
Oxford, UMass Summer School at
see English Department–Oxford, UMass Summer School at RG-25/E3/3

Cushman, Artemas

Artemas Cushman Account Book, 1822-1846.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 073 bd

Born in Middleborough, Mass., in 1781, Artemas Cushman relocated to the central Vermont town of Braintree as a young man and spent decades as a carpenter and house joiner. He and his wife Phebe Spear raised a family of nine, one of whom (Artemas’ namesake) rose to local prominence as a officer in the state militia and representative in the state house and senate. Cushman died in Braintree in 1864.

Cushman’s small ledger is a fine record of the day-to-day work of an antebellum carpenter in rural Vermont. Part daybook and part account book, and often lacking in detail, Cushman’s entries document the work of a skilled artisan engaged in constructing or repairing houses, windmills, cider mills, bake houses, sheds, and barns, and at least one school. Occasionally, he applied his skills to smaller projects such as mending a wheel or making a wagon body or coffin, and less frequently he was compensated for manual labor (haying or planting). In a cash-poor economy, Cushman was typically repaid through an exchange of labor, or through commodities such as brandy, grain, or pork.

Subjects

  • Braintree (Vt.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Carpenters--Vermont--Braintree

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Du Bois Fellowship Recipients

2016

John Hyland (English, University of Buffalo and Haverford College)
“The forest of melody: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Sounding of the Environment”
Nicholas T. Rinehart (English, Harvard University)
“‘These illegitimate children of my thought’: The dramatic work and criticism of W.E.B Du Bois”

2015

Nneka Dennie (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Male Feminism and the Evolution of Du Boisian Thought, 1903-1920”
Crystal Webster (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“‘The Transfiguring Soul of Childhood’: Du Bois and the Social, Political, and Cultural Role of Black Children”

2014

Brandon Byrd (Assistant Professor of History, Mississippi State University and University of North Carolina)
“The Problem of Haiti as it Stands Today:” W.E.B. Du Bois on the U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934″
Donald Geesling (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Song and the Talented Tenth: The Musical Imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois, 1902-1942″

2013

Horace D. Ballard Jr. (Public Humanities, History of Art, and American Studies, Brown University)
“Ethics and Aesthetics: Citizenship and Form”
Emahunn Raheem Ali Campbell (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“W.E.B. Du Bois’s Literary Interventions on Black Criminality”
Daniel Chard (History, UMass Amherst)
Exploring the history of ’60s-’70s radical groups allows Chard to investigate the origins of the first police institutions in the U.S. dedicated to domestic “counter-terrorism”

2012

J. Anthony Guillory (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“The Physical Uplift of Race”
Desmond Jagmohan (Government, Cornell)
“Creating Community, Cultivating Citizens, and Interrogating Jim Crow: The Political Thought of Booker T. Washington”

2011

Markeysha Davis (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Daring propaganda for the beauty of the Human Mind’:
Redefinition and Reaffirmation of the New Black Self in Poetry and Drama of the 1960s and 1970s”
Ricky Fayne (English, Northwestern)
“‘The Shadow of a Mighty Negro Past': Du Bois and the Re-memory of Africa in to the Black America”

Du Bois Library Fellowships

du bois

The Department of Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library offers short-term residential fellowships to assist younger scholars in conducting research in its collections. Among the approximately 15,000 linear feet of manuscripts held by SCUA are many valuable collections for the study of social change in the United States, including the papers of the most important exponent of the politics and culture of the twentieth century, W.E.B. Du Bois. In addition, the University Library houses over three million volumes and a rich suite of electronic resources to support advanced research in the humanities. Comprehensive, searchable guides and finding aids to SCUA’s collections are available on this website.

View past Du Bois Fellows

Application information

Eligibility: Full time graduate students, faculty, or independent scholars (with a PhD), with a preference for persons early in their career. Fellows may come from any field and any perspective, and they may work on any topic, but their research should explore the major themes that characterize Du Bois’s scholarship and activism, including the history and meaning of racial, social, and economic justice; the problems of democracy and political inclusion; the role of capitalism in world affairs; and the global influence of African cultures. Applicants must be U.S. citizens.
Award & expectations: Fellows will receive $2,500 to defray expenses. Fellows are required to spend four consecutive weeks in residence at SCUA, during which time they will work with our collections. At the end of their residency, fellows will be asked to deliver a public talk on their research. Fellows may schedule their residency at any time between July in the year of award through the following April.
Selection criteria: Fellows will be selected on a competitive basis from applicants interested in conducting original research in the Du Bois Papers and other SCUA collections. The criteria for selection will include: 1) potential of the proposal to contribute to scholarship, 2) fit with Du Boisian themes, 3) the need for use of SCUA collections, and 4) the letter of support. The application will consist of a brief (up to 3 pages) description of the research project, a curriculum vita, and a letter of support.
Deadline for submission: Applications must be received by March 31, 2016.
How to submit: Applications should be submitted electronically to scua [at] library.umass.edu with “Du Bois application” and your name in the subject line. Letters of recommendation should be sent separately to the same address.

InformationDownload the application form (rtf file).

Duus, Peter, 1933-

Peter Duus Papers, ca.1970-2008.

13 boxes (19.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 574

The William H. Bonsall Professor of History at Stanford University and a prolific scholar, Peter Duus has made significant contributions to the understanding of the development of Japanese imperialism and the emergence of the modern Japanese nation. Having received his doctorate from Harvard, Duus taught successively at Harvard, Washington University, and the Claremont Graduate School before arriving at Stanford in 1973. The recipient of numerous awards during his career, he has served in numerous positions within the field and as Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford.

The Duus Papers contain the professional correspondence, research notes, and other materials relating to the career of the eminent Japanologist, Peter Duus.

Subjects

  • Japan--History--20th century
  • Stanford University--Faculty
  • Stanford University. Department of History

Contributors

  • Duus, Peter, 1933-

ETHIR recipients

How can I apply for an ETHIR Fellowship?

2015

Chelsea Sams (Art)
Delene White (German and Scandinavian Studies)

2014

David Bendiksen (Comparative Literature)
Gregory Coleman (English)
Donald Geesling (Afro-American Studies)

2013

Spencer Kuchle (Afro-American Studies)
Jaime Pagana (Art History)

2012

Matthew Ferrari (Communications)
Nature, Landscape, and the Visual Culture of Sport Marketing in the McCormack Archive
Thomas Hopper (English)

2011

Molly Campbell (History)
Behold And See As You Pass By: Gravestones and Mortuary Art In Early New England
A digital exhibit drawn from the collections of the Association for Gravestone Studies
Tom Hohenstein (History)
Rhetoric or Research: The CIA at UMass
An examination of protests and counter-protests against CIA recruitment at UMass Amherst in the 1980s.
Emily Oswald (History)
Source, History, Story: Teaching U.S. History in the Archives

Events calendar

Double exposure of Steve Diamond
Double exposure of
Steve Diamond, ca.1985

To promote scholarship, raise public awareness of its collections, and encourage discussion of critical issues affecting American society, SCUA sponsors a number of events each year, including two annual colloquiua:

Throughout the year, the department sponsors other events, ranging from exhibit openings to lectures, book signings, and celebrations of donors and new donations. All SCUA events are free and open to the public. Please contact the department for additional information.

Learn more:

Exhibits

Tulip poplar leaves
Tulip poplar leaf
Arthur Mange Collection

Drawing upon the unique materials under their care, the staff of the Department of Special Collections and University Archives organize two to three exhibits a year in their reading room and work regularly with their colleagues in the general library to prepare other exhibits for display on the Lower Level of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library.

Current Exhibit

Through The Photographer’s Eyes: The Diana Mara Henry Collection (20th Century Photographer)

  • August 19, 2016-January 13, 2017
  • Location: SCUA and Learning Commons, Du Bois Library

The work of photojournalist Diana Mara Henry spans four decades of political, social, and cultural change in America. After graduating from Harvard with a degree in government in 1969, Henry returned to New York to work as a researcher with NBC News and as a general assignment reporter for the Staten Island Advance, but in 1971 she began to work as a freelance photographer. Among many projects, she covered the Democratic conventions of 1972 and 1976 and was selected as official photographer for both the National Commission on the Observance of International Women’s Year and the First National Women’s Conference in 1977, and while teaching at the International Center of Photography in Manhattan from 1974-1979, she developed its community workshop program and was a leader in a campaign to save the Alice Austen House. Her body of work ranges widely from the fashion scene in 1970s New York and personal assignments for the family of Malcolm Forbes and other socialites to political demonstrations, cultural events, and photoessays on one room schoolhouses in Vermont and Ulster County, NY, and everyday life in Brooklyn, France, Nepal, and Bali.

Henry’s photographs have appeared in government documents, magazines, books such as Newsweek’s Pictures of the Year 1977, and the 1989 Pulitzer and Tony award-winning play The Heidi Chronicles. They have been exhibited in many locations including a one-woman show at the Women’s Hall of Fame in Seneca Falls, NY; The Park Avenue Armory, NYC; and The American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar, Richmond, VA. In addition to the UMass Amherst Libraries, Henry’s photographs are in the collection of the National Archives.

The exhibit features photographs taken by Henry along with a rich array of related materials—including speeches, press releases, brochures, and her own notes—collected over the years; taken together they document the political and cultural scene of the second half of the twentieth century. Items on display cover a wide range of topics from the Vietnam Veterans Against the War, The Women’s Pentagon Action, the McGovern campaign, the New York State Women’s Meeting and First National Women’s Conference to Permaculture, New York politics, and New York society.

Upcoming Exhibits

Coming soon!

Exhibits online
Arthur Mange100 photos: Arthur Mange

Photographs from the collection of Arthur Mange.
Diana Mara Henry PhotographsPhotographer: DMH

Photographs from the collection of Diana Mara Henry. An exhibit by Chuck Abel.
E.D. HudsonE.D. Hudson: an Abolitionist Life

An examination of social reform and antislavery in Antebellum New England. An exhibit by Charles Weisenberger.
Rhetoric or researchRhetoric or Research

interprets student protests against CIA recruitment at UMass Amherst during the 1980s through a selection of images taken by student photojournalists.
By Tom Hohenstein (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
Gordon HeathSource, History, Story: Teaching U.S. History in the Archives

A digital curriculum for teaching U.S. history using archival resources.
An exhibit by Emily Oswald (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
I see dead peopleBehold And See As You Pass By

An online exhibit on gravestones and mortuary art in Early New England drawn from the Association for Gravestones Studies Collections.
By Molly Campbell (ETHIR recipient, 2011)
Robot readerUncertain Futures

Science fiction readership in the Cold War and beyond.
An exhibit by Morgan Hubbard.
Letters homeFifteen letters

Conrad D. Totman’s letters home from Korea, 1954-1955.
An exhibit by Alex McKenzie.
Du Bois photographsDu Bois: The Activist Life

An online exhibit on the life and legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois based on his papers.
A scarab beetleHerbals and Insects

A selection of rare botanical and entomological books from the SCUA collections.
A beeApiculture and culture

Books on bees and beekeeping.
An exhibit by Richard A. Steinmetz.

 

 

Friends genealogy

Genealogists are the largest single group of researchers using the Friends records, but they often meet with frustration. One common misconception is that these records are neatly organized and indexed. While William W. Hinshaw’s Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy provided thorough indexes for the records of many yearly meetings, including New York, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania and North Carolina, the New England records have never been completely indexed. The only access to information on New England Friends is usually through a search of the records, either on microfilm or in the original. Here are some important points to remember for typical genealogical problems.

  1. It is important to know both place and time. If an individual moved around New England, it will be very helpful to sketch out a chronology of their travels.
  2. All vital records are recorded by the Monthly Meeting. You will need to determine which monthly meetings your ancestor belonged to. If there is no monthly meeting named after their town, look it up in the index in the back of this book. The town may have held smaller meetings that were part of a larger nearby monthly meeting.
  3. If their town is not indexed, examine the maps on pages 12 to 14 of this guide. Were there any meetings nearby? Until the age of automobile travel, it is unlikely that many practicing Friends lived more than a few miles away from at least a worship group. Even if they did maintain the “Discipline” of Friends in a distant town, their vital records would prob- ably not be recorded by a Monthly Meeting.
  4. If a probable Monthly Meeting can be determined, look at that meeting’s entry in the monthly meeting section. Check for vital records in the listing at the bottom of this entry. Are there any birth, death, marriage or membership records? Removals and denials are also useful (see glossary). Minutes are less useful for genealogy, but sometimes include marriage information, and occasionally memorials to the deceased.
  5. If the records that you want have been microfilmed, this will be indicated in the last column: “Film#”. This is the microfilm number at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library. An asterisk indicates that it can also be found at the Maine Historical Society Library, and a plus sign indicates that it can be ordered from the Family History Centers operated by the Latter-Day Saints (Mormons). An @ symbol indicates that the film is available through the Nantucket Historical Association.
  6. If the records have not been microfilmed, you will need to consult the original. The location of originals is given in the “Loc.” column. Most of them are on deposit at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library, which houses the official Archives of New England Yearly Meeting.
  7. If you are researching early Friends (pre-Revolutionary), it is likely that you will not discover anything new in the vi- tal records. Friends records have always been a major resource for colonial genealogy, and have been consulted for most of the major reference works that you have already looked at. It is, however, possible to find new information in meeting minutes, to verify membership or residence in a location.

For further information, Our Quaker Ancestors: Finding Them in Quaker Records by Ellen Thomas Berry and David Allen Berry (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987) is a book-length treatment of general approaches to Quaker genealogy.

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