Results for: “Sweater industry--New York (State)--New York--Employees--Interviews” (600 collections)SCUA

Grosvenor Family

Grosvenor Family Account Book, 1823-1827.

1 vol. (0.15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 340 bd

Account book of the Grosvenor famly from 1823-1827. The volume was later used a scrapbook to hold newspaper clippings, as a result much of content and context of the account book is obscured by its later use.

Subjects

  • Grosvenor family

Types of material

  • Account books

Harris, Carl C.

Carl C. Harris Papers, 1898-1960.

12 boxes (18 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 667
A slencil
A slencil

An inventor, entrepreneur, and corporate executive, Carl C. Harris was the third of four generations of his family to help manage the Rodney Hunt Company, a major manufacturer of waterwheels, turbines, and textile machinery based in Orange, Mass. While still in high school in 1898, Harris already displayed a sharp business and technical eye, establishing the first telephone company in Orange, and he began his career after graduation from Worcester Polytechnical Institute, working as a draftsman for GE and then as a superintendent at Rodney Hunt. After a brief stint at the Simplex Time Recorder Company in Gardner, Harris returned to Rodney Hunt for good in 1912. After acquiring a controlling interest in 1917, he remained with the company in several capacities through the Depression and Second World War, serving as general manager, vice president, and treasurer, and from 1938-1947, as president. Throughout his career, Harris remained active in developing or improving a variety of new products and processes, registering a total of 99 patents, and he regularly used his offices at Rodney Hunt to launch other, smaller enterprises, including the Slencil Company,which manufactured mechanical pencils; Riveto, which produced toys and a paper fastening device; and Speed-Mo, a manufacturer of a moistening pad system. Harris retired in 1956 and died four years later in Orange at the age of 79.

The Harris Papers are centered closely on the entrepreneurial activity of Carl C. Harris, and include a particularly thick set of business records for the Slencil Company (ca.1935-1960) and the Riveto Company (1930s-1940s), and the slender record book of the Home Telephone Company. In addition to these, the collection includes many dozen slencils, including prototypes, speciality models, presentation sets, store displays, and marketing designs; examples of Riveto toys, Simplex inventions, flotation devices, and other oddities invented by Harris, along with the associated patents.

Subjects

  • Orange (Mass.)--Economic conditions
  • Orange (Mass.)--History
  • Toys

Contributors

  • Harris, Carl C.
  • Riveto Company
  • Rodney Hunt Company
  • Slencil Company
  • Speed-Mo Company

Types of material

  • Realia

Hemenway, Phinehas

Phinehas Hemenway Daybook, 1818-1828.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 627

The tanner Phinehas Hemenway was born in Bolton, Worcester County, Mass., in September 1794, the fourth of six children born to Simeon and Mary (Goss) Hemenway, but he resided nearly his entire adult life in the Franklin County hill town of Shutebsury. Although little is known about his life, Hemenway appears to have married twice, to a Polly or Mary Gray in about 1816, and to the widow Mary Sears of Prescott in Aril 1838. Hemenway died in Shutesbury on December 21, 1850.

With approximately 150 pages of brief, but closely written records of daily transactions, the Hemenway daybook documents the range of activities of rural tannery in antebellum Massachusetts. Along with the names of clients, the date and amount, and a brief notation on whether the work was for dressing, tanning, currying, or (apparently) the sale of finished product, Hemenway records work in a variety of leathers, from calf to sheep, hog, and horse and from sole leather to upper leather, sometimes specified as for shoes. The daybook also includes credit entries for labor performed, the purchase of hemlock bark or hides, or more rarely for cash to settle accounts.

Subjects

  • Shutesbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Tanners--Massachusetts--Shutesbury

Contributors

  • Hemenway, Phinehas, 1796-1850

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Hodges, C.W., b. 1824

C.W. and J.F. Hodges Account Books, 1862-1865.

2 vols. (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 209

In the 1860 census, brothers Charles W. (b. 1824) and Joseph F. (b. 1828) Hodges resided in the same house along with Charles’ wife Mary and their year old son Charles Jr. These two account books are presumed to be the customer ledgers of the Hodges and Messinger grocery store in Foxborough, Massachusetts, based on the list of customers and their proximity to the store in the 1876 county atlas.

Subjects

  • Foxborough (Mass.)--History--19th century
  • Grocers--Massachusetts--Foxborough

Types of material

  • Account books

Hubbard and Lyman

Hubbard and Lyman Daybook, 1844-1847.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 237 bd

Partners who manufactured harnesses, saddles, and trunks in Springfield, Massachusetts. Includes the prices paid for harnesses, whips, trunks, valises, and a variety of repair jobs such as splicing, coupling, and repairing of the hoses of the Springfield Fire Department. Also contains method and form of payment (principally cash, but also wood, leather, and leather thread in exchange) and twenty pages of clippings with the names of Lyman’s daughters, Mary and Frances, written on them.

Subjects

  • Aaron P. Emerson Co. (Orland, Me.)
  • Barter--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Harness making and trade--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Harnesses--Prices--History
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Springfield (Mass.). Fire Dept
  • Trunks (Luggage)--Prices--History
  • Wages--Leatherworkers--Massachusetts--Springfield--History--19th century
  • Whips--Prices--History

Contributors

  • Hubbard and Lyman
  • Hubbard, Jason, b. 1815
  • Lyman, Moses, b. 1815

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Hunt, W. W.

W. W. Hunt Account Book, 1886-1888..

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 621 bd

The proprietor of a general store and postmaster in Wendell Depot, Mass., W. W. Hunt carried on a thriving business for a small Franklin County town during the 1880s and 1890s. Selling a range of dry goods, foodstuffs, and other goods, Hunt catered to residents in Wendell and neighboring communities up and down the Miller River.

An extensive ledger, marked No. 5, the W.W. Hunt account book contains records of sales of a surprising range of dry goods and foodstuffs, snaths and scythes, stamps and envelopes, and other goods useful to a rural community. Although most of Hunt’s customers were individuals seemingly purchasing for personal consumption, he also sold goods to the Farley and Goddard Wood Paper Companies, the Ladies Aid Society, and the town of Wendell, with some accounts marked “Town Farm.”

Subjects

  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Wendell Depot
  • Wendell Depot (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century

Contributors

  • Hunt, W. W.

Types of material

  • Account books

Iron trade

Iron Trade Business Ledger, 1801-1810.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 196 bd

In the ledger entitled “Petty Debts: B, Iron Accounts,” 1801-1810, the unidentified Northampton based owner kept track of the outstanding debts for iron he sold. Most of the entries simply refer to a page number in another, presumably more detailed, daybook, sometimes adding “to iron” or “to steel.” The title “Iron Accounts” suggests the possibility the owner kept books for other commercial accounts as well.

Subjects

  • Iron industry and trade--Massachusetts

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Kellogg, Rufus

Rufus Kellogg Ledger, 1840-1850.

1 vol. (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 041 bd

A notable figure in Amherst, Mass., prior to the founding of Amherst College, Rufus Kellogg was born on July 16, 1794, the child of Jerusha and Joseph Kellogg. Married to Nancy Stetson in June 1820, Kellogg made a successful, if highly varied living, serving as town postmaster (1809-1824), keeping an inn and tavern at the “City” beginning in 1818, and farming, and he became a stalwart of the local Masonic lodge. His son Rufus Bela Kellogg rose even higher on the social ladder, graduating from Amherst College in 1858 and became a prominent banker.

A diverse and fairly complicated book of records, the Kellogg ledger is part waste book, day book, memorandum book, and account book, marking records of lending a horse and sleigh are interspersed with accounts for the sale of grain and hay, boarding locals, repairing pumps, and other miscellaneous transactions. Although it is unclear precisely which member or members of the Kellogg family kept any individual record, it appears that Rufus must have initiated the book, although later entries were clearly made by one or more of his children.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Hotelkeepers--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Amherst

Types of material

  • Account books

Kress, Claude Washington

Kress Political Economy Collection, 1673-1925 (Bulk: 1750-1850).

2,934 items (46.5 linear feet).
Call no.: D8 .A2

The heart of the Kress Collection lies in the livley pamphlet literature regarding Anglo-American political economics in the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. Although somewhat miscellaneous, the collection contains thousands of titles touching on many of the major issues in trade, finance, politcal reform, and public policy in Britain and to a lesser degree America. Topics range from tariffs and free trade to public debt and taxation, imports and exports, banking, unionism, and socialism. Nearly three quarters of the collection dates from before 1848.

Subjects

  • Economics--History--18th century
  • Economics--History--19th century
  • Great Britain--Politics and Government--18th century
  • Great Britain--Politics and Government--19th century

Lamson and Goodnow

Lamson and Goodnow Records, 1837-1911.

23 boxes, 14 vols. (38 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 662
Lamson and Goodnow
Lamson and Goodnow

In 1834, Silas Lamson devised a curved snath that greatly improved the efficiency of the scythe, and riding the commercial success of his invention, Lamson, his sons Ebenezer and Nathaniel, and partner Abel Goodnow, founded the manufacturing firm of Lamson and Goodnow in Shelburne Falls, Mass., in 1837. Early in its history, Lamson and Goodnow recruited skilled workers from cutlery centers in England and Germany and began manufacturing the high quality knives and tableware that have remained the center of their production ever since. The firm was a major contributor to the region’s transformation from a primarily agricultural to an industrial economy, and by the time of the Civil War, they helped establish the Connecticut River Valley had emerged as the center of American cutlery production. At vartious points during their history, Lamson and Goodnow have been involved in the manufacture of arms (e.g. the Springfield Rifle), sewing machines, agricultural implements, and other tools. They remain active in the production of cutlery, trade tools, and kitchenware.

The Lamson and Goodnow records contain relatively dense documentation of a major manufacturer of cutlery and agricultural implements from roughly the time of its founding in 1837 through shortly after the turn of the twentieth century. In addition to account books, records of orders, sales, and production, and a dizzying array of canceled checks, receipts, and trade cards, the collection includes correspondence from field agents and customers that document the growth of the company during the first 75 years of its operation.

Subjects

  • Cutlery trade--Massachusetts
  • Shelburne Falls (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Lamson and Goodnow

Types of material

  • Account books
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