Results for: “Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--Massachusetts--Amherst” (933 collections)SCUA

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Massachusetts Indian Association. Stockbridge Auxilliary

Massachusetts Indian Association Stockbridge Auxiliary Records, 1886-1909.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 151 bd

The Stockbridge Auxilliary of the Massachusetts Indian Association was formed by prominent local women in western Berkshire County who sought to aid in educational and missionary work for and among Indians, and to “abolish all oppression of Indians within our national limits.”

Records include minutes that document the group’s committees, meetings, dues, and contributions to Indians on reservations nation-wide, accounts, membership lists, and a letter.

Subjects

  • Indians of North America--Arizona--Social conditions
  • Indians of North America--Government relations--History
  • Indians of North America--Missions--History
  • Indians of North America--Social conditions
  • Indians, Treatment of--United States--History
  • Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian
  • Lake Mohonk Conference of Friends of the Indian and Other Dependent Peoples
  • Stockbridge Indians--Social conditions

Contributors

  • Carter, Henry J
  • Massachusetts Indian Association. Stockbridge Auxiliary

UMass Amherst. Dean of Students

UMass Amherst. Dean of Students, 1948-1987. 27 boxes (13.25 linear feet).

The Office of the Dean of Students at UMass Amherst was established by President John Lederle in 1961 to replace the separately structured offices of the Dean of Men and Dean of Women, and to provide more effective, more flexible support for a growing and changing student body. In the 1960s, the Dean of Students had responsibility for almost all operational units related to student life, including Admissions, Records, Residence Halls, Dining Halls, Student Union, Student Activities, Placement, and Financial Aid. As the University became a statewide administrative unit with the opening of UMass Boston and the Medical School, there was an increasing conflict between the Office of the Dean of Students on the Amherst campus and the growing demands for a responsive administrative hierarchy. In 1970, the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs was therefore created to provide an appropriate level of supervision for the various Student Affairs divisions with regard to budget, personnel and administration. The Office of the Dean of Students then became a student contact-based office, which cooperated and collaborated with the other divisions. The first Dean of Students, William Field came to UMass in 1951 as a guidance counselor and assistant professor of psychology. His tenure coincided with the massive expansion of campus and the turbulent years of the late 1960s and early 1970s, during which he played an important mediating role. The recipient of the Chancellor’s Medal in 1983, Field retired from office in 1988.

An important series of records documenting student life on the UMass Amherst campus, with an emphasis on the 1960s and 1970s. Among these are an extensive series of bylaws and charters for residence halls and registerred student organizations (RSOs) at UMass, as well as subject files on campus protests and demonstrations, students of color, and student groups of various sorts.

Subjects

  • African American students–Massachusetts.
  • Field, William.
  • Student movements–Massachusetts.
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean of Students.
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst–Students.
Call no.: RG 30/2

United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America. Massachusetts State Council

UBCJA Massachusetts State Council Records, 1892-1980.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 015

One of the largest building trade unions in the U.S., the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America was established in 1881 by a convention of carpenters’ unions. An early member of the American Federation of Labor, the Brotherhood began as a radical organization, but beginning in the 1930s, were typically aligned with the conservative wing of the labor movement.

The records of the Massachusetts State Council of the United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America contain reports and other information generated during the union’s annual conventions as well as copies of the constitution and by-laws, handbooks, and histories of the union.

Subjects

  • Carpenters--Labor unions
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America

Western Massachusetts Library Club

Western Massachusetts Library Club Records, 1898-2006.

7 boxes (3.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 492
Deerfield Public Library
Deerfield Public Library

Situated in a region known for its progressive spirit, the Western Massachusetts Library Club was established in 1898 to respond to the unique needs of librarians overseeing small or rural libraries, and to foster camaraderie among local colleagues. Almost immediately, however, the club expanded its focus, taking positions on issues ranging from modern library practices to national legislation and leading the way in the expansion of services for public libraries, all while maintaining its identity as an advocate for local libraries and librarians.

The collection is richest in records that document the early history of the club including detailed meeting minutes, news clippings, programs, and circulars. Beginning in the late 1960s, the club’s activities are captured primarily through membership lists and meeting notices and programs. Taken together, the records trace the growth of the WMLC for more than a century from its establishment to the present.

Subjects

  • Cutter, Charles A. (Charles Ammi), 1937-1903
  • Libraries--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Western Massachusetts Library Club

Advanced search

Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Local 125

ACWA Records, 1928-1984.

(8 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 001

Based in New Haven, Connecticut, Local 125 was a chapter of the Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America (ACWA) that worked to improve wages and hours of work, to increase job security, to provide facilities for advancing cultural, educational, and recreational interests of its members, and to strengthen the labor movement. Key figures in Local 125 included Aldo Cursi who, with Mamie Santora, organized the Connecticut shirtworkers and served as Manager from 1933 to 1954; John Laurie who served as Business Manager from 1933 to 1963; and Nick Aiello, Business agent in 1963 and Manager from 1964 to 1984.

The collection includes constitution, by-laws, minutes, contracts, piece rate schedules, accounts, subject files, scrapbooks, newsclippings, printed materials, photographs and a phonograph record. These records document the history of Local 125 from its founding in 1933 to 1984, when the Local office in New Haven was closed. Included also are correspondence and case materials pertaining to grievance and arbitration proceedings (access restrictions apply).

Subjects

  • Clothing trade--Labor unions--Connecticut
  • Labor unions--Connecticut
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Textile industry--Connecticut
  • Textile workers--Labor unions--Connecticut

Contributors

  • Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America. Local 125

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Scrapbooks
  • Sound recordings

Chrisman, Miriam Usher

Miriam Chrisman Papers, 1937-2007.

13 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 128
Miriam U. Chrisman, 1964
Miriam U. Chrisman, 1964

A noted scholar of the social impact of the German Reformation, Miriam Usher Chrisman was born in Ithaca, New York, on May 20, 1920. With degrees from Smith College, American University, and Yale, she served for over thirty years on the faculty of the Department of History at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, becoming a well-loved professor and treasured mentor to a generation of students.

A faithful and colorful correspondent, the bulk of Miriam Chrisman’s papers consist of letters written to family and friends stretching from her college days at Smith through the year before her death. The bulk of the correspondence is with her husband, Donald Chrisman, an orthopedic surgeon who was enrolled at Harvard Medical School during their courtship. Soon after the Chrismans married in November 1943, Donald left for active duty in the Navy on the U.S.S. Baldwin. The couple’s war correspondence is unusually rich, offering insight on everything from the social responsibilities of married couples to their opinions on the progression of the war. Of particular note is a lengthy letter written by Donald during and immediately after D-Day in which he provides Miriam a real-time description of the events and his reactions as they unfold. Later letters document Miriam’s extensive travels including a trip around the world. .

Subjects

  • Smith College--Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of History
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Chrisman, Miriam Usher

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Concordance for the Archives, W

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

W

WAGES
see Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) RG-45/40/W6
Wail, Summer School
see Summer School Wail RG-45/00/S10
Walden Learning Center
see Psychology Department RG-25/P8/3
Waltham Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Field Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Waltham Suburban Experiment Station
see Suburban Experiment Station, Waltham RG-15/9
Ward Commission
see Massachusetts Commission on Corruption (Ward Commission) RG-36/23
Wareham Agricultural Engineering Laboratory
see Agricultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Wareham Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory
see Aquacultural Engineering Laboratory, Wareham RG-25/M6.1
Washington Irving Literary Society (1867-1892)
RG-45/40/W3
see also Literary Society (1953-1959) RG-40/3/L4
Waste Prevention, National Environmental Technology for
see National Environmental Technology for Waste Prevention Institute (NETI) RG-25/N3
Water Color Paintings (Memorabilia, general)
RG-183/5
Water Crisis, UMass Amherst (Physical Plant) (1980-1989)
RG-36/50/W3
see also Water Supply (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/W4
Water Polo
see Sports, Men’s Water Polo (1992) RG-18/2
Sports, Women’s Water Polo (1995- ) RG-18/2
Water Resources Research Center (WRRC)
RG-25/W2
Water Resources Research Center–Annual Reports (1968, 1970- )
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Completion Reports (1969-1977)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Newsletter (1983-1993)
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Publications
RG-25/W2/00
Water Resources Research Center–Special Reports
RG-25/W2/00
Water Supply (Physical Plant)
RG-36/50/W4
see also Water Crisis (1980-1989) RG-36/50/W3
Waugh Arboretum (Physical Plant) (1944)
RG-36/104/W3
Waugh Memorial Garden Committee (Faculty Senate, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
W.E.B. Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of RG-25/A4
W. E. B. Du Bois Library
see Library Buildings-Tower (University Library/W.E.B. Du Bois Library) (1961- ) RG-8/5/3
W.E.B. Du Bois Petition Coalition (1993-1995)
RG-45/80/W4
Weekly Biff, The (Student Publication) (1910)
RG-45/00/W4
Weekly Bulletin (1971-1985)
see Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
Weekly News, The (Student Publication) (1989)
RG-45/00/W5
Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin, and Executive Bulletin (1912-1985)
RG-5/00/3
see also University Bulletin (newsprint format) RG-5/00/6
Campus Chronicle (newspaper)(1985- ) RG-5/00/10
West Campus Design Proposal (1993) (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/W4
Western European Area Studies (Program and Committee)
RG-25/W3
Western Massachusetts Latin American Solidarity Committee
see Latin American Solidarity Committee, Western Massachusetts RG-45/80/L3
WFCR of Note (1991- )
RG-60/8
WFCR Program Guide (1966-1991)
RG-60/8
WFCR Radio Station
RG-60/8
WFCR Weekly Classified Music (1993- )
RG-60/8
Wheel (Student Social Action Group) (1986)
RG-45/80/W3
WIG
see Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5
Wilder Times (Landscape Architecture Department) (1972-1993)
RG-25/L2/00
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative
(College of Food and Natural Resources) RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit; Fishery Unit, Massachusetts Cooperative–Contributions (1970-1974)
RG-15/6
Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (Massachusetts Cooperative)
see Massachusetts Cooperative Wildlife Research Unit Quarterly Progress Report (1948-1988) RG-15/6
Winter, Alumni Day
see Mid-Winter Alumni Day (1923-1926) RG-40/2/M5
Winter School
see Summer School, Short Courses RG-6/17
WISPP
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/P7
WMUA (FM Radio Station) (1948- )
RG-45/30/W6
WOCH (Orchard Hill Radio Station) (1987- )
RG-45/30/W7
Women, Advisory Council of
see Advisory Council of Women (1921-1964) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
see also Advisory Council of Women (Film, ca. 1927) RG-186/100/1
Women and Minority Groups, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Women and Minority Groups, Associate (1968-1981) RG-6/13
see also Affirmative Action Office (1982- ) RG-4/7
Everywoman’s Center RG-7/2
Women, Dean of
see Dean of Women RG-30/3
see also Dean of Women, Helen Curtis (1902-1993) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women in German (WIG) (1975- ) RG-40/3/W5

Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP)
RG-40/5/W5
Women, National Organization for
see National Organization for Women (NOW) (1989- ) RG-45/80/N7
Women, New England Council of Land-Grant University
see New England Council of Land-Grant University Women RG-60/1/1
Women of Color Program (1993-1998) /Women of Color Leadership Network (WOCLN) (1998- )
(Everywoman’s Center ) RG-7/2/2/9
see also Third World Women’s Programmer (1979-1989) RG-7/2/2/5
Women, Status of, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1970- )
RG-40/2/A3
Women, University
see University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Admissions and General Support (WAGES) (1985-1989)
RG-45/40/W6
Women’s Caucus and Vietnam Veterans Against the War (1971-1972)
RG-45/80/W5
Women’s Clubs
see Engineering Faculty Women’s Club (Engineering Wives) RG-40/7/3
New Comer’s Club RG-40/7/2
University Women RG-40/7
Women’s Conference, Five-College
see Five-College Women’s Conference, Valley Women’s Studies Journal RG-60/9
Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
see Women’s Equity Project RG-7/2/2/1
Women’s Equity Project (1972-1984)
RG-7/2/2/1
Note: Formerly Women’s Educational Equity Project (WEEP)
Women’s Health, Center for Research and Education in
see Center for Research and Education in Women’s Health (CREWH) RG-17/1/2
Women’s Leadership Project (1984-1989)
RG-45/80/W6
Women’s Network, Graduate
see Graduate Women’s Network (1994- ) RG-45/40/G7
Women’s News in the Collegian (Official University Committee) (1978)
RG-40/2/W6
Women’s Physical Education (WOPE)
see Physical Education, Women’s RG-25/P3.2
Women’s Program Development
RG-7/8
Women’s Programmer, Third World
see Third World Women’s Programmer RG-7/2/2/5
Women’s Rights, Progressive Organization of
see Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989- ) RG-45/80/P7
Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA)
RG-45/4
see also Women’s Student Government Association Handbooks for Women (1925-1941) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Women’s Studies Newsletter (1976- ) RG-25/W5/00

Women’s Studies Program
RG-25/W5
Wood Science and Technology
RG-25/W7
WOPE Department
see Physical Education, Women’s Department (WOPE) RG-25/P3.2
Worcester Medical School
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
Wrestling
see Sports, Men’s Wrestling (1965, 1970-1971) RG-18/2
Writing Program
RG-25/E3/1
see also University Writing Program RG-7/11
Writing Program, ad hoc Committee for (Faculty Senate, 1982- )
RG-40/2/A3
WRRC
see Water Resources Research Center (WRRC) (1970- ) RG-25/W2
WSGA
see Women’s Student Government Association (WSGA) RG-45/4
WSUR (Southwest Radio Station) (1998)
RG-45/30/W8
WSYL (Sylvan Radio Station) (1986)
RG-45/30/W9

International Oil Working Group

International Oil Working Group Collection, 1957-1987 (Bulk: 1980-1985).

29 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 268

The International Oil Working Group (IOWG) is one of a number of organizations that worked to implement an oil embargo initiated by the United Nations General Assembly against South Africa to protest the country’s policies of apartheid. The IOWG grew out of the Sanctions Working Group established in 1979. Although the nature and timing of the change in names is unclear, it appears that Dr. Teresa Turner was instrumental in the formation of both groups and was primarily responsible for their organization and administration. Other directors included Luis Prado, Arnold Baker and Kassahun Checole. While the group was loosely organized, it maintained the basic structure of a special advisory board with a pool of research associates. Primary activities involved researching topics related to the oil embargo; writing papers for regional, national, and international conferences; giving testimony at UN meetings; providing information to governments, unions and other groups committed to aiding in the implementation of the oil embargo; lecturing to students and members of the community on the subject of sanctions against South Africa; and collaborating with the UN Center Against Apartheid. Research topics included tanker monitoring to detect and expose those shipping companies that broke the embargo; the energy needs in those countries in southern Africa which depend upon South Africa to meet some of their energy demands; ways to effectively implement and enforce the oil embargo; trade union action by oil transport workers; Namibian independence and decolonization; and underground oil storage in South Africa.

Collection consists of administrative papers including financial records, minutes and association history materials; correspondence; printed materials produced by the IOWG; conference files; UN documents relating to South Africa and sanctions; and reference materials, including published reports, news clippings, newsletters and journals, related to oil shipping, tanker information and South African economic and political activity generally.

Subjects

  • Apartheid--South Africa--History
  • Economic sanctions--South Africa--History
  • Embargo
  • Namibia--History--Autonomy and independence movements
  • Namibia--Politics and government--1946-1990
  • Petroleum industry and trade--History--20th century
  • Petroleum industry and trade--Political aspects--South Africa
  • South Africa--Politics and government--1978-1989
  • Tankers--South Africa--History

Contributors

  • International Oil Working Group
  • Turner, Terisa
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