Results for: “Seth Porter and Co. (Firm)” (76 collections)SCUA

Kinsley, Edward W.

Edward W. Kinsley Papers, 1863-1891.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 101

A wool dealer in the firm of Horswell, Kinsley, and French of Boston, Edward W. Kinsley captured his memories of the Civil War in a series of written reminiscences. These typescript copies include his memories of the raising of the 1st North Carolina Colored Regiment, his second visit South and the Emancipation Proclamation Celebration, General Tom Stevenson’s confirmation as Brigadier-General, the second election of President Lincoln, and the fall of Richmond among others. The collection also includes passages from Kinsley’s diary, letters, a scrapbook, photographs, newspaper clippings, and notes from the diary of Edward’s wife, Calista A. Kinsley.

Subjects

  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865

Contributors

  • Kinsley, Edward W.

Types of material

  • Diaries

Lamson and Goodnow

Lamson and Goodnow Records, 1837-1911.

23 boxes, 14 vols. (38 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 662
Lamson and Goodnow
Lamson and Goodnow

In 1834, Silas Lamson devised a curved snath that greatly improved the efficiency of the scythe, and riding the commercial success of his invention, Lamson, his sons Ebenezer and Nathaniel, and partner Abel Goodnow, founded the manufacturing firm of Lamson and Goodnow in Shelburne Falls, Mass., in 1837. Early in its history, Lamson and Goodnow recruited skilled workers from cutlery centers in England and Germany and began manufacturing the high quality knives and tableware that have remained the center of their production ever since. The firm was a major contributor to the region’s transformation from a primarily agricultural to an industrial economy, and by the time of the Civil War, they helped establish the Connecticut River Valley had emerged as the center of American cutlery production. At vartious points during their history, Lamson and Goodnow have been involved in the manufacture of arms (e.g. the Springfield Rifle), sewing machines, agricultural implements, and other tools. They remain active in the production of cutlery, trade tools, and kitchenware.

The Lamson and Goodnow records contain relatively dense documentation of a major manufacturer of cutlery and agricultural implements from roughly the time of its founding in 1837 through shortly after the turn of the twentieth century. In addition to account books, records of orders, sales, and production, and a dizzying array of canceled checks, receipts, and trade cards, the collection includes correspondence from field agents and customers that document the growth of the company during the first 75 years of its operation.

Subjects

  • Cutlery trade--Massachusetts
  • Shelburne Falls (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Lamson and Goodnow

Types of material

  • Account books

Lederle, John William, 1912-

John W. Lederle Papers, 1947-1983 (Bulk: 1960-1970).

(32.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 L43
John W. Lederle
John W. Lederle

John Lederle played a large role in shaping the Amherst campus as it looks today, transforming UMass Amherst into a nationally respected research university and “great public center for excellence in higher education.” Born in Royal Oak, Michigan, Lederle received his Ph.D. from the University of Michigan in 1942. Admitted to the Michigan Bar in 1936, he worked with a Detroit law firm from 1936 to 1940 before joining the political science department at Brown University from 1941 to 1944. He returned to the University of Michigan in 1944, filling a number of positions until 1960, when the University of Massachusetts elected him President. Under Lederle’s leadership, the Amherst campus enjoyed its greatest period of growth. From 1960 to 1970, student enrollment more than tripled and faculty salaries nearly doubled. The academic program expanded greatly, particularly at the graduate level, and under his watch, the university instituted an academic press, a public radio station, and collaborative arrangements between the local colleges. The University system also evolved in the Lederle years, with the establishment of the Boston campus in 1964 and the medical school in Worcester in 1962.

The Lederle Papers include professional correspondence, administrative records, subject files, committee notes, reports, and clippings; Extra-University records that document Lederle’s involvement and interactions with governmental and non-governmental organizations at the state, regional, and national levels; personal correspondence, speeches, bibliographies of his writings, biographical information, a transcript of an oral history describing his administration, and materials relating to his professional activities that followed his presidency; and a series of confidential records.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. President

Contributors

  • Lederle, John William, 1912-

Lyman, Frank

Frank Lyman Papers, 1927-1980.

6 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 735
Frank Lyman, ca.1945
Frank Lyman, ca.1945

A manufacturer of electronics and radio communications, Frank Lyman was a native of Northampton and graduate of the Williston Academy and Harvard (class of 1931). The grandson of Joseph Lyman and great-nephew of Benjamin Smith Lyman, Lyman joined Harvey Radio in the late 1930s, during a time when it was building radio transmitting equipment, purchasing the company in 1940 and becoming its president. An investor in Boston-area radio stations, Lyman oversaw the company’s post-transition into the manufacture of of autmomatic machines and tooling and its merger into the electronics firm, Cambridge Thermionic Corporation (later renamed Cambion) in 1968. Lyman died in 1992, followed by his wife, Jeanne (Sargent), in 2005.

The Lyman Papers contain business correspondence and associated documents relating to both Harvey Radio Corporation and Cambridge Thermionic Corporation, along with associated materials pertaining to Frank Lyman’s investments and personal interests. Beginning during his time at the Williston Academy and extending through his adult life, the collection includes Lyman’s diaries and a small amount of personal correspondence.

Subjects

  • Cambion
  • Cambridge Thermionic Corporation
  • Harvey Radio Company
  • Radio industry and trade--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Lyman, Frank

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Photographs

MacLeish, Archibald

Archibald MacLeish Papers, 1938-1982.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 494

American poet, writer, and Librarian of Congress, Archibald MacLeish was associated with the modernist school of poetry and awarded the Pulitzer Prize three times. The collection features a manuscript of “An Evening’s Journey To Conway, Massachusetts,” written to commemorate the bicentennial anniversary of the town, as well as correspondence with Kenneth Murdoch documenting their friendship over three decades.

Subjects

  • Poets--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • MacLeish, Archibald

Mange, Arthur P.

Arthur P. Mange Photograph Collection, 1965-2010.

3 boxes (4.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 044
Fern fronds
Fern fronds

Arthur P. Mange taught in the Biology Department at University of Massachusetts Amherst for 31 years before retiring in 1995. A co-author of numerous works in human genetics, Mange served on the chair of the Conservation Committee in Amherst, and currently serves on the Burnett Gallery Committee. In 1983, his New England images were featured in Across the Valley (from Cummington to New Salem) held at the Burnett Gallery. This exhibition was followed at the Hitchcock Center in 1984 with Delight in Familiar Forms (celebrating some well-known plants and animals), with Ring Bell to Admit Bird at the Jones Library and Net Prophet at Cooley Dickinson Hospital. Architectural Sights — Big and Small, Mange’s most recent show (2002), appeared at the Burnett Gallery. In addition to exhibitions, Mange has also donated collections for fund-raising auctions at New York University, the Cooley Dickinson Hospital, the University of Massachusetts Fine Arts Center, the Amherst Historical Society, Jones Library, and the Amherst Community Arts Center.

His photographic collection spans more than half a century of subjects reflecting his varied interests in animals, plants, our region, gravestones, what he calls “whimsical signs,” and attention-grabbing shadows.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • Cemeteries--Pictorial works
  • Hadley (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • New England--Pictorial works
  • New Salem (Mass.)--Pictorial works
  • New York (N.Y.)--Pictorial works

Types of material

  • Photographs

Massachusetts Review

David Lenson, editor of the Massachusetts Review, hosts MR2, an hour-long radio show on radio station WMUA (FM 91.1) featuring interviews with local writers, artists, and cultural critics.

Digital copies of the interviews can be purchased through the Massachusetts Review.

 

  • Sut Jhally, Professor of Communication at UMass Amherst and Director of the Media Education Foundation.
      Broadcast: Jan. 9, 2003 (File size: 13.6 Mb)
  • Bill Streeter, owner of Silver Maple Bindery in Northampton
      Broadcast: Jan. 2, 2003 (13.4 Mb)
  • Hans Teensma, principle of the design firm InPress, Northampton, Mass.
      Broadcast: Jan. 9, 2003 (13.0 Mb)
  • Dara Wier, poet and Professor in the MFA program at UMass Amherst
      Broadcast: Jan. 2, 2003 (12.6 Mb)
  • Matthew Zapruder, Poet and publisher
      Broadcast: March 6, 2003 (14.1 Mb)

McCormack, Mark H.

Mark H. McCormack Papers, ca. 1920-2008 (Bulk: 1957-2003).

ca. 2,500 boxes (3,800 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 700

Once hailed by Sports Illustrated as “the most powerful man in sport,” Mark Hume McCormack directly engineered the growth of money and media in modern professional sport. After graduating from the College of William and Mary with a B.A. in French and receiving a law degree from Yale, McCormack joined the Cleveland-based law firm of Arter, Hadden, Wykoff, and Van Duzer in 1957. An accomplished golfer in college, McCormack remained close to the game, qualifying for both the British and U.S. amateur championships and the U.S. Open in the 1950s.  While working as a lawyer and entrepreneur, he leapt to prominence by striking a deal to represent Arnold Palmer in 1960 in what has become known as a legendary handshake deal. With that auspicious start, McCormack soon added golfers Gary Play and Jack Nicklaus to his roster of clients, followed by a long succession of notable international sports figures and celebrities from Formula-1 driver Jackie Stewart, Olympic skier Jean-Claude Killy, tennis stars Billy Jean King and Pete Sampras to Margaret Thatcher, Pope John Paul II and models Kate Moss and Gisele Bundchen.  McCormack quickly added corporations and sporting events such as Wimbledon, the Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews, and Rolex as clients in sponsorship, licensing, event management, and media deals. These clients became the basis of IMG Worldwide, Inc., forming one of the largest management, media, and marketing companies in the world. The author of a dozen books on management and sport, McCormack became a famous figure himself as a business man, negotiator, and deal-maker before passing away in 2003.

With a growing collection of approximately 2,500 boxes of records that represent the personal life of Mark H. McCormack and the intertwined corporate records of IMG, the McCormack Papers provide an inside look at the last 50 years of the business of professional sport. The collection contains correspondence, memos, drafts, reports, contracts, research files, marketing materials, and memorabilia. The collection is arriving in stages and is being processed. Some materials will be restricted.

Subjects

  • Corporate sponsorship
  • Golf
  • Olympics
  • Palmer, Arnold, 1929-
  • Professional athletes
  • Special events--Management
  • Sports -- Marketing
  • Television and sports
  • Tennis
  • Wimbledon Championships (Wimbledon, London, England)

Contributors

  • All England Club
  • Borg, Björn, 1956-
  • IMG Worldwide, Inc.
  • Killy, Jean Claude
  • Laver, Rod
  • Nicklaus, Jack
  • Palmer, Arnold, 1929-
  • Player, Gary
  • Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St. Andrews

Mercantile House (Portland, Me.)

Mercantile House Ledger, 1792-1804.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 285

Firm based in Portland, Maine, that supplied “merchandize” to local merchants in Maine, as well as in several locations in New Hampshire, Massachusetts, and northeastern Massachusetts. Firm undertook international “adventures” as well. Ledger includes general accounts for merchandise, bills receivable and payable, cash, profit and loss, storage, and truckage, as well as accounts generated with certain ships.

Subjects

  • Maine--Commerce--18th century
  • Maine--Commerce--Massachusetts--18th century
  • Maine--Commerce--New Hampshire--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Commerce--Maine--18th century
  • Merchants--Maine--Portland--18th century
  • New Hampshire--Commerce--Maine--18th century
  • Portland (Me.)--Commerce--18th century
  • Shipping--Accounting--18th century
  • Storage and moving trade--Maine--18th century

Types of material

  • Account books

Middleborough (Mass.) country store

Middleborough (Mass.) Country Store Daybook, 1825-1827.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 221

Country store in the village of Titicut in Middleborough, Massachusetts, owned by members of either the Clark or Pratt families of the village. Includes goods for sale (groceries, cloth, hardware, and liquor), the method and form of payment (cash, rags, straw, wood, brick, and produce), customers’ names, and ways that families and women earned credit (producing braid or carting goods for the owners).

Subjects

  • Barter--Massachusetts--Middleborough--19th century
  • Braid--Massachusetts
  • Freight and freightage--Massachusetts
  • General stores--Massachusetts--Middleborough
  • Middleborough (Mass.)--Commerce--19th century
  • Titicut (Middleborough Mass.)--Commerce--19th century

Types of material

  • Daybooks
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