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SCUA

Results for: “Radical Student Union” (375 collections)SCUA

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Upholsters International Union. Local 58

Finding aid

Upholsters International Union Local 58 Minutebooks, 1901-1939.

7 vols. (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 018

Upholsterers were among the earliest trades in the United States to organize into a national union, with the first efforts dating to the 1850s. The most successful of their unions, the Upholsterers International Union of North America, was founded in Chicago in 1892 and affiliated with the American Federation of Laborers in 1900. One year later, UIU Local 58 was established to organize workers in Washington, D.C.

The minutebooks of UIU Local 58 document the history of the union from its formation in 1901 through the late 1930s.

Subjects

  • Labor unions--Washington (D.C.)
  • Upholsterers--Labor unions

Contributors

  • Upholsters International Union

Types of material

  • Minutebooks

Valley Women’s Union

Finding aid

Valley Women's Union Records, 1974-1976.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 201

The Valley Women’s Union was established in 1974 by members of the Valley Women’s Center, Northampton, Massachusetts, who were committed to political change benefiting women. They were concerned that the Valley Women’s Center had become a static umbrella organization and that many of its formerly vital functions had been absorbed by local social service agencies The VWU sought to unify groups that were working for political change beneficial to women.

Records include newsletters, agendas for meetings, reports, position papers, and mailings.

Subjects

  • Feminism--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History
  • Feminists--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity--History
  • Social change--Political activity--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--History
  • Women--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity --History

Contributors

  • Valley Women's Union (Northampton, Mass.)

Yarn Finishers Union (Fall River, Mass.)

Finding aid

Yarn Finishers Union (Fall River, Mass.) Records, 1919-1922.

1 flat box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 006

The Yarn Finishers Union was one of several autonomous craft bodies affiliated with the Fall River-based American Federation of Textile Operatives (originally known as the National Amalgamation of Textile Workers). Active in several shops — including Durfee Mills, Tecumseh Mills, Union Belt Co., O.B. Wetherell and Son, and Troy Cotton and Woolen Manufactory — the Yarn Finishers included membership from different segments of the work force, including rollers, quillers, and harness markers.

This slender collection documents two years of labor activism by the Yarn Finishers Union in Fall River, Mass. The minutebook begins in May 1919 as the Yarn Finishers voted to strike over low and unequal wages, particularly those to “girls,” and includes references to elections, financial issues such as the proposition to institute a minimum wage scale, and to settling disputes. The minutes continue through the end of a much quieter year, 1922. The second volume consists of a record of union dues collected, arranged loosely by craft.

Subjects

  • Fall River (Mass.)--History
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Textile workers--Labor unions--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • American Federation of Textile Operatives

Types of material

  • Minutebooks

Allen, Dwight William, 1931-

Finding aid

Dwight William Allen Papers, 1967-1975.

4 boxes (4.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 165
Dwight Allen in classroom
Dwight Allen in classroom

A influential and flamboyant educational reformer, Dwight W. Allen served as Director of Teacher Education at his alma mater Stanford from 1959 until accepting a position as Dean of the School of Education at UMass Amherst in 1967. A proponent of integrating technology into teaching and co-developer of the technique of microteaching, Allen cemented his reputation as an innovator during his time at UMass (1968-1975), a time that coincided with the rapid expansion of the university. Allen helped recruit students of color to the graduate program in significant numbers, opened admissions to students with unconvential credentials, allowed students a voice in directing and governing the program, and abolished grading, among other initiatives, but while supporters lauded the creativity and excitement of the period, his radical ideas elicited considerable opposition as well. He resigned in 1975, in part due to the increasing demands his international consulting, later accepting a position at Old Dominion University, where he remained until his retirement in 2008. Allen is author of nine books, including American Schools: The $100 Billion Challenge, written with his former graduate student Bill Cosby.

The Allen papers contain a wealth of materials pertaining to the tumultuous years at UMass, including Allen’s curricular and teaching reforms, special projects, and his efforts to recruit African American students and address institutional racism. The correspondence, memos, and private reports that Allen maintained are particularly valuable for understanding the period as are the various surveys, studies, and reports on the state of the School of Education. The collection also includes material relating to some of Allen’s academic interests in education, including microteaching, alternative schools, and certification.

Subjects

  • Alternative education
  • Educational change
  • Racism in education
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Education

Alternative Energy Coalition

Finding aid

Alternative Energy Coalition, ca.1975-1985.

9 boxes (13.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 586

A product of the vibrant and progressive political culture of western Massachusetts during the early 1970s, the Alternative Energy Coalition played a key role in the growth of antinuclear activism. In 1974, the AEC helped mobilize support for Sam Lovejoy after he sabotaged a weather tower erected by Northeast Utilities in Montague, Mass., in preparation for a proposed nuclear power plant, and they helped organize the drive for a referendum opposing not only the proposed plant in Montague, but existing plants in Rowe, Mass., and Vernon, Vt. Forming extensive connections with other antinuclear organizations, the AEC also became one of the organizations that united in 1976 to form the Clamshell Alliance, which made an art of mass civil disobedience.

The AEC Records provide insight into grassroots activism of the 1970s and 1980s, galvanized by the seemingly unrestrained growth of the nuclear power industry. The records, emanating from the Hampshire County branch, contain both research materials used by the AEC and organizational and promotional materials produced by them, including publications, minutes of meetings, correspondence, and materials used during protests. Of particular interest are a thick suite of organizational and other information pertaining to the occupation of the Seabrook (N.H.) nuclear power plant in 1979 and minutes, notes, and other materials relating to the founding and early days of the Clamshell Alliance. The collection is closely related to the Antinuclear Collection (MS 547).

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Hampshire County (Mass.)--History
  • Nonviolence--Massachusetts
  • Nuclear energy--Massachusetts
  • Pacifists--Massachusetts
  • Political activists--Massachusetts
  • Renewable energy source
  • Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant (N.H.)
  • Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station

Contributors

  • Alternative Energy Coalition
  • Clamshell Alliance

Types of material

  • Realia

Ambellan, Harold

DigitalFinding aid

Harold Ambellan Memoir, 2005.

1 item (75p.)
Call no.: MS 855

A native of Buffalo, N.Y., the expatriot sculptor Harold Ambellan was a participant in the Federal Art Project during the 1930s and a figure in the radical Artists’ Union and Sculptors Guild. After naval service during the Second World War, Ambellan left the United States permanently to escape the hostile climate of the McCarthy-era, going into exile in France. Although a friend of artists such as Pollock, de Kooning, and Rothko, Ambellan’s work was primarily figurative and centered on the human form. His work has been exhibited widely on both sides of the Atlantic. He died at his home in Arles in 2006 at the age of 94.

In 2005, Victoria Diehl sat with her friend, Harold Ambellan, to record his memories of a life in art. Beginning with recollections of his childhood in Buffalo, N.Y., the memoir delves into the impact of the Great Depression, Ambellan’s experiences in the New York art scene of the 1930s and his participation in the leftist Artists’ Union, his Navy service, and his expatriate years in France from the 1950s-2000s. Ambellan’s memoir also includes extended discussion of his views of democracy, patriotism, and art, and his career as a sculptor.

Subjects

  • Artists--20th century
  • Democracy
  • Depressions, 1929
  • Expatriate artists--France
  • New Deal, 1933-1939
  • Sculptors--20th century
  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Diehl, Victoria
  • Guthrie, Woody, 1912-1967

Types of material

  • Memoirs
  • Oral histories

Brinley Family

Finding aid

Brinley Family Papers, 1643-1950.

(4.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 161
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729<br />Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)<br />after John Smibert
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729
Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)
after John Smibert

A prosperous family of merchants and landowners, the Brinleys were well ensconced among the social and political elite of colonial New England. Connected by marriage to other elite families in Rhode Island and Massachusetts — the Auchmutys, Craddocks, and Tyngs among them — the Brinleys were refined, highly educated, public spirited, and most often business-minded. Although many members of the family remained loyal to the British cause during the Revolution, the family retained their high social standing in the years following.

The Brinley collection includes business letters, legal and business records, wills, a fragment of a diary, documents relating to slaves, newspaper clippings, and a small number of paintings and artifacts. A descendent, Nancy Brinley, contributed a quantity of genealogical research notes and photocopies of Brinley family documents from other repositories. Of particular note in the collection is a fine nineteenth century copy of a John Smibert portrait of Deborah Brinley (1719), an elegant silver tray passed through the generations, and is a 1713 list of the library of Francis Brinley, which offers a foreshadowing of the remarkable book collection put together in the later nineteenth century by his descendant George Brinley.

Subjects

  • American loyalists--Massachusetts
  • Book collectors--United States--History--19th century
  • Brinley family
  • Brinley, George, 1817-1875--Library
  • Businessmen--Massachusetts--History
  • Businessmen--Rhode Island--History
  • Craddock family
  • Landowners--Massachusetts--History
  • Landowners--Rhode Island--History
  • Libraries--Rhode Island--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--19th century
  • Rhode Island--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Rhode Island--Genealogy
  • Rhode Island--Politics and government--19th century
  • Slavery--United States--History
  • Tyng family
  • United Empire Loyalists

Types of material

  • Deeds
  • Realia

Chamberlin, Judi, 1944-2010

Finding aid

Judi Chamberlin Papers, ca.1970-2010.

30 boxes (45 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 768
Judi Chamberlin, 2000
Judi Chamberlin, 2000

A pioneer in the psychiatric survivors’ movement, Judi Chamberlin spent four decades as an activist for the civil rights of mental patients. After several voluntary hospitalizations for depression as a young woman, Chamberlin was involuntarily committed for the only time in 1971, having been diagnosed with schizophrenia. Her experiences in the mental health system galvanized her to take action on patients’ rights, and after attending a meeting of the newly formed Mental Patients’ Liberation Project in New York, she helped found the Mental Patients’ Liberation Front in Cambridge, Mass. Explicitly modeled on civil rights organizations of the time, she became a tireless advocate for the patient’s perspective and for choice in treatment. Her book, On Our Own: Patient Controlled Alternatives to the Mental Health System (1978), is considered a key text in the intellectual development of the movement. Working internationally, she became an important figure in several other organizations, including the Center for Psychiatric Rehabilition at Boston University, the Ruby Rogers Advocacy Center, the National Disability Rights Network, and the National Empowerment Center. In recognition of her advocacy, she was awarded the Distinguished Service Award by the President’s Committee on Employment of People with Disabilities in 1992, the David J. Vail National Advocacy Award, and the 1995 Pike Prize, which honors those who have given outstanding service to people with disabilities. Chamberlin died of pulmonary disease at home in Arlington, Mass., in January 2010.

An important record of the development of the psychiatric survivors’ movement from its earliest days, the Chamberlin Papers include rich correspondence between Chamberlin, fellow activists, survivors, and medical professionals; records of her work with the MPLF and other rights organizations, conferences and meetings, and her efforts to build the movement internationally.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Mental Patients Liberation Front
  • Mental Patients Liberation Project
  • National Empowerment Center

Types of material

  • Videotapes

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

Finding aid

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Concordance for the Archives, B

A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

B

Baccalaureate Day
see Press Information (Commencement) RG-1/7/1
Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration (BDIC)
RG-11/4
Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration Newsletter (1973- )
RG-11/4
Baha’i Club (Religious Club) (1972-1997)
RG-45/70/B3
Bands (Music and Dance Department)
RG-25/M9.2
Banqueteer, Aggie
see Aggie Banqueteer RG-45/00/A2
Baseball (Men’s)
see Sports-Men’s Baseball (1868- ) RG-18/2
Basketball (Men’s)
see Sports-Men’s Basketball (1898- ) RG-18/2
Basketball (Women’s)
see Sports-Women’s Basketball (1978- ) RG-18/2
Bathrooms, Coed (Physical Plant) (1981)
RG-36/50/B3
see also Office of Residential Resource Management RG-30/21/1
Baton Twirling
see Sports-Women’s Baton Twirling (1973) RG-18/2
Bay State Ruralist (1912-1917)
RG-45/00/B2
BCC
see Boston Church of Christ (1990- ) (Religious Group) RG-45/70/B6
BCP
see Bilingual Collegiate Program (BCP) (1974- ) RG-6/4/6.5
BDIC
see Bachelor’s Degree with Individual Concentration (BDIC) (College of Arts and Sciences) RG-11/4
BDIC Newsletter (1973-1987)
RG-11/4
Beacon (1970- )
RG-13/00
Beautification Committee, Campus
see Campus Beautification Committee RG-40/2/C.6
Beef and Sheep Highlights (Extension Service, Cooperative) (1958, 1967-1975)
RG-15/8
see also Sheep Shearing (1947, 1954-1955) RG-15/8
Behavior Program, Neuroscience and
see Neuroscience and Behavior Program RG-25/N5
Behavioral Biology, Department of
see Psychology–Behavioral Biology, Dept. of RG-25/P8
Behavioral Sciences Faculty
see Social and Behavioral Sciences Faculty RG-11/30
Berkshire County Cooperative Extension (1915-1989)
RG-15/8/.81
Beta Alpha Psi (Honor Society)
see Accounting Department–Beta Alpha Psi RG-25/A2
Beta Gamma Sigma
RG-45/60/B2.5
Beta Kappa Phi (1985-1996)
RG-45/90/B4
Beta Theta of Sigma Gamma Epsilon
see Sigma Gamma Epsilon (1949- ) RG-45/90/S5.35
Bibliofile, The (1987, 1994)
RG-45/00/B4
Bibliography, Faculty/Staff
see Faculty/Staff Bibliography (collective) RG-40/4
Bibliography Library Collections
see Collection Development (Library) RG-8/2
Bibliography, Organization Charts (University as a Whole) (1949- )
RG-1/00/1
Bicentennial Committee
see Inter-Campus Committee RG-3/100
Bi-Cultural Education
see Bi-Lingual, Bi-Cultural Education, Center for RG-13/3/21/6
Biff, The Weekly
see Weekly Biff, The (1910) RG-45/00/W4
Bilingual Collegiate Program (BCP) (1974- )
RG-6/4/6.5
Bilingual Collegiate Program–Springfield/UMass Minority Achievement Program (SUMMA)
RG-6/4/6.5
Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (1991)
RG-25/B5
Biodiversity Conservation Program (1990)
RG-25/F6/3
Biographies (Alumni)
see Obituaries, Biographies (Alumni) RG-50/00/2
Biography, Lists, Directories, Faculty/Staff
see Faculty/Staff Biography, Lists, Directories (collective) RG-40/10
see also Individual Members of Faculty and Staff RG-40/11
Biological Hazards Committee (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/1/2/4
Biological Sciences Library (1962- )
RG-8/3/9
Biology
RG-25/B6
see also Zoology Department RG-25/Z5
Botany Department RG-25/B8
Biology, Plant
see Plant Biology RG-25/P4.5
Biomedical Research Support Grants
see Faculty Research Grant, Biomedical Research Support Grant (F RG/BS RG) (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/2/3
Biopharmaceutical Research Unit
see Public Health, Division of–Biopharmaceutical Research Unit RG-17/1
BIOrhythms (1997- )
RG-25/B6/00
Biosci Journal (1995- )
RG-25/B6/00
Note: A journal of undergraduate research at UMass/Amherst.
Biostatistics Technical Reports (1977)
see Public Health, Division of–Biostatistics Technical Reports
RG-17/1
Biotechnology Program
RG-25/B7
Biotechnology Program Committee (1985- )
RG-40/2/B5
Bisexual Concerns
see Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns, The Chancellors Task Force on (1993- ) RG-40/2/G2
Gay, Lesbian, and Bisexual Concerns, Support Group for RG-40/2/G3
Programs for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns RG-30/2/6
Bits and Bytes (1965-1989)
RG-29/00/1
Black and other Minority Students, Committee for the Collegiate Education of
see Committee for the Collegiate Education of Black and other Minority Students (CCEBMS) (1967- ) RG-6/4/12
Black Culture Center (New Africa House)
RG-30/26
Black Mass Communications Project (BMCP) (1968- )
RG-45/30/B4
Black Repertory Theatre
RG-25/T3.6
Black Student Union
RG-45/19
Black Students at UMass and in Western Massachusetts
RG-45/15
see also Protests and Demonstrations RG-45/101
Student Life RG-1/204
New Africa House RG-36/100
Lecturers from outside the University RG-1/12
Black Studies, Contributions to
see Contributions to Black Studies RG-60/5/00
Black Studies Program
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Dept. of RG-25/A4
see also Five College Cooperation RG-60/5
Five College Black Studies RG-60/5/3
Blue Prints (Cartographic Materials)
RG-181/1
Blues Band (1985- )
RG-45/40/B4
BMCP
see Black Mass Communications Project (BMCP) (1968- ) RG-45/30/B4
Board of Control Annual Report (Experiment Station) (1888, 1893, 1894)
see Experiment Station (State Station, 1882-1895)–Board of Control Annual Report (1888, 1893, 1894) RG-15/2.1
Board of Control Meetings (Experiment Station) (1882-1895)
see Experiment Station (State Station, 1882-1895)–Board of Control Meetings (1882-1895) RG-15/2.1
Board of Governors
RG-37/11
Board of Higher Education (1996- )
see Higher Education Coordinating Council (1991-1996) RG-1/5
Board of Higher Education, Massachusetts
see Massachusetts Board of Higher Education RG-1/3
Board of Regents (1980-1991)
RG-1/4
see also Massachusetts Board of Higher Education RG-1/3
Higher Education Coordinating Council RG-1/5
Board of Trustees
see Trustees RG-2
Board of Trustees, Faculty Delegate to the
see Faculty to the Board of Trustees (Faculty Senate, 1971-1972) RG-40/2/A3
Boarding Club, MAC (1884)
RG-45/40/B6.2
Bologna, UMass Program at
see French and Italian Department–Bologna, UMASS Program at RG-25/F9/3
Boltwood Project (Social Action Group) (1983- )
RG-45/80/B6
see also Belchertown State School Friends Association (BSSFA) MS302
Bond Center for Equal Education
see Horace Mann Bond Center for Equal Education RG-13/4/10
see also Status Report–Reports to Chancellor (1982) RG-4/00
Book Club, MAC (1908-1925)
RG-45/40/B6.4
Book for Little Loving Children Needing Guidance (1+1=/=3) (1973)
RG-45/00/B6
Books for College Libraries (Library) (1967-1974)
RG-8/4/2
Boston Church of Christ (BCC) (Religious Group) (1990-1993)
RG-45/70/B6
Boston Library Consortium (1975- )
RG-8/10
Boston, UMass
see UMass Boston (1964- ) RG-55/3
Boston University Combined Degree, Granting with UMass and Simmons College
RG-60/4
Botanic Garden (Physical Plant)
RG-36/104/B6
Botany
RG-25/B8
Botany News (1981-1988)
RG-25/B8/00
Bowl Team, College
see College Bowl Team RG-45/40/C5
Boys’ and Girls’ Series (Extension Service, Cooperative)
see
Extension Service, Cooperative–Boys’ and Girls’ Series RG-15/8
Brain Theory Newsletter (1978)
RG-25/C9/00
Broadcast Board, Student Publications and
see Publications and Broadcast Board, Student RG-45/30/P8
Brochures (Public Affairs)
RG-5/00/4
BRSG
see Faculty Research Grant–Biomedical Research Support Grant (F RG-BRSG) RG-9/2/3
Budget
see Budget Documents RG-4/2
Office of Budget and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Capital Outlay Budgets and Priorities Lists RG-6/15/4
Vice Chancellor for Administration and Finance RG-35/19
Budget and Finance
RG-32/6
Budget and Finance, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1980-1981)
RG-40/2/A3
Budget Committee (Faculty Senate, 1969-1973)
RG-40/2/A3
see also Program and Budget Committee (1975- ) RG-40/2/A3
Budget Committee (Student Senate) (1981-1993)
RG-45/7/B8
Budget Documents (1908- )
RG-4/2
Budget Office (Administrative Services)
RG-35/20
see also Budget Documents–Newsclippings RG-4/2
see also Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Budgeting and Institutional Research
see Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgeting and Institutional Studies, Office of
see Office of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgeting, Institutional Research and Planning
seeOffice of Budgeting and Institutional Studies (OBIS) RG-4/3/2
Budgets, Capital Outlay
see Planning Office RG-6/15/4
Building Association
RG-36/22
Building Authority
RG-36/21
see also Financial Reports RG-3/4/3
Building Materials Technology and Management Program
RG-25/B9
Building Ventilation Working Group, Campus
see Campus Building Ventilation Working Group RG-30/15/1
Buildings and Grounds
RG-36
see also Buildings and Grounds (Photographs) RG-150
Panoramic Photos RG-170
Buildings and Grounds (Photographs)
RG-150
see also Panoramic Photos RG-170
Buildings and Grounds, Campus (Films and Videotapes)
see Campus Buildings and Grounds (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/4
Buildings and Grounds Committee (Faculty Senate, 1968-1969, 1980)
RG-40/2/A3
Buildings or parts of campus, specific
see Specific buildings or parts of campus RG-101 thru 104
Buildings Proposed But Not Built
RG-36/103
Buildings, Residential
see Residential Buildings RG-36/102
Buildings Specific (except residential)
RG-36/101
see also Residential Buildings RG-36/102
Buildings proposed but not built RG-36/103
Bulletin Series
see Catalogs (Bulletin Series) (1901- ) RG-1/00/4
Bulletin, University (Catalog Series)
see RG-1/00/4 Catalogs (Bulletin Series ) (1901- ), General Information Bulletins (1898-1978)
Bulletins
see Weekly, University, Executive Bulletins RG-5/00/3
Bulletins, Alumni
see Alumni Bulletins RG-50/00/3
Bulletins, Experiment Stations
seeExperiment Station (1882-95)–Bulletin (#’s 1-57) (1883-1895) RG-15/2.1
and
Experiment Station (1888- )– Bulletin (#1- ) RG-15/2.2
Bulletins, General Information
see Catalogs (Bulletin Series), General Information Bulletins RG-1/00/4
Bureau of Government Research
RG-25/P6.5
Bureau of Government Research Bulletin (1959-1969)
RG-25/P6.5/00
Bureau of Public Administration
RG-25/P6.4
Bursar
RG-35/16
Bursars Office (Microfilm)
RG-190/17
Bus Service, Student Senate
see Student Senate Bus Service RG-45/7/T7
Business Administration, School of
see School of Management RG-12
Business Affairs
see Vice President for Management and Business Affairs RG-3/11
Business Affairs–Office of (Business Manager and Staff) (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/4/1
Business Affairs, Office of (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/4
Business and Economic Report, Massachusetts
see Massachusetts Business and Economic Report RG-12/3/B8
Business and Economic Research, Center for
RG-12/3
see also Massachusetts Business and Economic Report RG-12/3/B8
Business Club
RG-12/4
Business Development Center
see Massachusetts Small Business Development Center (MSBDC) RG-12/10
Business Leadership Education, Affirmative
see Project ABLE RG-12/2
Business Office, Director of Personnel and Financial Services
RG-35/3
Business Procedures and Project Planning, Director of
RG-3/4/5
Businesses Student
see Co-ops and Businesses, Student Run RG-45/40/C6.5
ButterMeter News (1985)
RG-45/00/B8
  1. Pages:
  2. 1
  3. 2
  4. 3
  5. 4
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  7. 6
  8. 7
  9. 8
  10. ...
  11. 38

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