Search results for '“Electric power systems--Natural disaster effects --Massachusetts--Photographs”' (page 5 of 12) • SCUA • UMass Amherst Libraries
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Results for: “Electric power systems--Natural disaster effects --Massachusetts--Photographs” (114 collections)SCUA

Bowman, Mitzi

Mitzi Bowman Papers, ca.1970-2010.

12 boxes (18 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 761
Mitzi Bowman, 2012
Mitzi Bowman, 2012

For years, Mitzi Bowman and her husband Pete were stalwarts of the progressive community in Connecticut, and tireless activists in the movements for social justice, peace, and the environment. Shortly after their marriage in 1966, the Bowman’s settled in Newtown and then in Milford, Conn., where Pete worked as an engineer and where Mitzi had trouble finding employment due to her outspoken ways. In close collaboration, the couple became ardent opponents of the war in Vietnam as well as opponents of nuclear weaponry. The focus of their activism took a new direction in 1976, when they learned of plans to ship spent nuclear fuel rods near their home. Founding their first antinuclear organization, STOP (Stop the Transport of Pollution), they forced the shipments to be rerouted, and they soon devoted themselves to shutting down nuclear power in Connecticut completely, including the Millstone and Connecticut Yankee facilities, the latter of which was decommissioned in 1996. The Bowmans were active in a wide array of other groups, including the New Haven Green Party, the Connecticut Coalition Against Millstone, the People’s Action for Clean Energy (PACE), and they were founding members of Fight the (Utility Rate) Hike, the Progressive Action Roundtable, and Don’t Waste Connecticut. Two years after Pete died on Feb. 14, 2006 at the age of 78, Mitzi relocated to Vermont, carrying on her activism.

The Bowman Papers center on Mitzi and Pete Bowman’s antinuclear activism, dating from their first forays with STOP in the mid-1970s through the growth of opposition to Vermont Yankee in the approach to 2010. The collection offers a valuable glimpse into the early history of grassroots opposition to nuclear energy and the Bowmans’ approach to organizing and their connections with other antinuclear activists and to the peace and environmental movements are reflected in an extensive series of notes, press releases, newsclippings, talks, ephemera, and correspondence. The collections also includes extensive subject files on radiation, nuclear energy, peace, and related topics.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--Connecticut
  • Connecticut Coalition Against Millstone
  • Don't Waste Connecticut
  • STOP (Stop the Transport of Pollution)

Contributors

  • Bowman, Pete

Broderick, Warren F.

Warren F. Broderick Photograph Collection, 1982-1983.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 028

A senior archives and records management specialist at the New York State Archives, Warren F. Broderick has published extensively on topics ranging from gravestone carving to the history of the upper Hudson River Valley. He is co-author of Pottery Works (1995), editor of a new edition of Granville Hicks’s Small Town (2004), and a contributor of numerous journal articles of historical subjects.

The Broderick Collection includes photographs of tombstones in Old Catholic Cemeteries in, Lansingburgh and Lebanon Springs, N.Y., and St. Josephs Cemetery, Pittsfield, Mass. The collection includes a folder of slides taken of St. Josephs Cemetery by Barbara Rotundo.

Subjects

  • Gravestones--Massachusetts
  • Gravestones--New York
  • Stone carving--New York

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Broderick, Warren F

Types of material

  • Photographs

Burgstahler, Albert W.

Albert W. Burgstahler Papers, ca.1956-2007.

75 boxes (120 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 798
Albert Burgstahler
Albert Burgstahler

The chemist and ardent opponent of fluoridation of drinking water, Albert W. Burgstahler was born in Grand Rapids, Mich., in 1928. After receiving degrees from Notre Dame (BS 1949) and Harvard (PhD 1953), he embarked on a productive career of over forty years at the University of Kansas. His research in the synthesis and chemistry of natural products and the biological properties of fluorinated amino acids, led Burgstahler to a keen interest in environmental pollutants, particularly fluorides, and from the mid-1960s on, he enjoyed a reputation as one of the most prominent and prolific scientific voices opposing fluoridation. His efforts and long service as editor and chief of the International Society for Fluoride Research’s quarterly journal, Fluoride, was formally recognized by the Fluoride Action Network in 2006, which awarded him its Scientific Integrity Award. Burgstahler retired from KU in 1998 and died on Oct. 12, 2013.

A large and diverse assemblage, the Burgstahler collection reflects the career of a stalwart in the anti-fluoridation movement. Spanning nearly five decades, the correspondence, publications, and research offer a perspective on Burgstahler’s activism in science and public policy and documents his association with other anti-fluoridation activists, including George Waldbott and Paul Connett.

Subjects

  • Antifluoridation movement
  • Drinking water--Law and legislation--United States
  • Fluorides--Physiological effect

Contributors

  • Waldbott, George L., 1898-

Cambodian New Year

Finding aid

Cambodian New Year Celebration Collection, 1986.

1 box (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 114
At home, photo by Cham Nan Koy, 1982
At home, photo by Cham Nan Koy, 1982

Organized by UMass anthropology professor Joel Halpern, the images in this collection were put on display during the Cambodian New Year celebration in 1986. As part of the celebration, members of the large community of Cambodian refugees who have resettled in Amherst were recognized.

The collection consists of photographs as well as programs, correspondence, and financial records pertaining to the Cambodian-Americans in Amherst New Year’s Day Celebration and Exhibit of 1986.

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Cambodian Americans
  • Political refugees--United States
  • Refugees--Cambodia

Contributors

  • Halpern, Joel M. (Joel Martin), 1929-

Types of material

  • Photographs

Cannabis Reform Coalition

Finding aid

Cannabis Reform Coalition Records, 1993-2013.

2 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 045/80 C3
Extravaganja poster
Extravaganja poster

The Cannabis Reform Coalition at UMass Amherst was founded in 1991 and is considered the oldest student-run organization devoted to ending the prohibition on cannabis both locally and nationally and advocating for its industrial, medicinal, and recreational use for moral, environmental, and economic reasons. The CRC is one of the more active student organizations on campus and among other events, it sponsors the annual Extravaganja in April, which has attracted as many as 10,000 participants.

The CRC collection contains an assortment of fliers, posters, ephemera, and photographs, documenting the organization’s activities and activism, along with a small number of published and unpublished essays on the utility of hemp and cannbis products.

Subjects

  • Marijuana--Law and legislation
  • Marijuana--Therapeutic use--Social aspects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Students

Types of material

  • Fliers (Printed matter)
  • Photographs

Charren, Stanley

Stanley Charren Papers, 1973 (Bulk: 2000).

3 boxes (4.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 900

Called “the Howard Hughes of the wind business,” Stanley Charren played a crucial role in the development of the modern wind power industry. A native of Providence, R.I., and an engineering graduate of Brown University (BS 1945) and Harvard (MS 1946). After marrying Peggy Walzer in 1951, who later became famous as founder of Action for Children’s Television, Charren embarked on a career that merged a penchant for innovation with an entrepreneurial streak, working with Pratt and Whitney, Fairchild, and Baldwin-Lima-Hamilton before becoming CEO of Pandel-Bradford (later Compo). Although he successfully developed products such as the swim spa and carpet squares, Charren is best remembered for his role in commercializing wind power. Taking an interest in wind during the Nixon-era energy crisis, he and his partner Russell Wolfe founded US Windpower in 1974, working on the idea of linking arrays of intermediate-sized windmills into a single power plant tied to the grid. US Wind built the world’s first wind farm in 1978, consisting of 20 units at Crotched Mountain, N.H., and after relocating to northern California in 1980 and changing name to Kenetech in 1988, the company emerged as the largest wind energy firm in the world. However the collapse of oil prices in the 1980s and federal regulatory hostility to alternative energy seriously impinged upon the company’s growth, ultimately contributing to its bankruptcy in May 1996. Charren retired from Kenetech in 1995.

The Charren Papers include scattered but valuable materials on the founding and operations of US Windpower and Kenetech, including early business plans, correspondence, technical reports, and informational brochures, along with materials documenting some of the legal challenges they faced in the 1980s and 1990s. The collection also contains ephemera relating to some of Charren’s work outside of the windpower industry.

Subjects

  • Kenetech
  • U.S. Windpower
  • Windpower industry

Copies & fees

How do I request copies?

Cow display
Cow display, MAC, ca.1930

Although our goal is to facilitate free and unfettered access to the materials under our care, Special Collections and University Archives (SCUA) may assess fees to recover the costs of reproduction or for publication of graphic materials. SCUA provides photocopies and reproductions in reasonable amounts for scholarly use under the following conditions:

  • Copies are prepared solely for the use of the researcher and may not be reproduced, published, broadcast, or placed in other repositories without the prior written permission of the Head of Special Collections and University Archives.
  • SCUA does not sell photocopies, photographs, or digital reproductions. Fees are assessed for services in identifying, copying, and transmitting duplicates. Copies are made only by SCUA staff.
  • SCUA reserves the right to limit the number of photoduplicates in any order and may decline to make duplicates if the item might be damaged in the process. Orders are limited to no more than 400 photocopies per researcher, per month.
  • Except for brief excerpts, SCUA will not duplicate copyrighted material without the written permission of the copyright owner. Researchers assume sole responsibility for any infringement of copyright.
  • Permission to publish must be requested separately, in writing.

Request copies by email:

Requests may be addressed to our archivists.

What are the fees?

  • Photoreproduction fees
    • Photocopies: 30 cents per page.
    • Low Resolution Scans: 30 cents per page.
    • High Resolution Scans: $5.00 each (Images are typically scanned at 100% of the original size at a resolution of 300 dpi.)
  • Publication fees (for images):
    • Academic or not for profit publications: $35.00 per image
    • Commercial publications: $125.00 per image
    • Cover art: $100.00 (academic) to $200.00 per image (commercial)

Curran, Mary Doyle, 1917-1981

Mary Doyle Curran Papers, 1948-1979.

5 boxes (2.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 435

Author, editor, and professor, Mary Doyle Curran published her only novel, The Parish and the Hill, in 1948. The collection includes unpublished drafts of novels and short stories; photographs; correspondence from family and friends; publishers and literary associates such as Saul Bellow and Josephine Herbst.

Subjects

  • Women authors--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Curran, Mary Doyle, 1917-1981

DeFrees, Madeline

Madeline De Frees Papers, 1951-1988.

13 boxes (6 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 051

After receiving her MA from the University of Oregon in 1951, Madeline De Frees embarked on a career teaching English and writing to students ranging in age from elementary school to college (University of Montana, Seattle University). Joining the faculty at UMass Amherst in 1979, she served as Director of the MFA program in Creative Writing from 1980 to 1983, retiring in 1985.

The DeFrees Papers are a collection of personal and professional correspondence, poems and other writings, interviews and photographs. Biographical materials, financial records, and interviews comprise the remainder of the collection.

Subjects

  • Poets--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • De Frees, Madeline
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English

Famous Long Ago Archive

Famous Long Ago Collection, ca.1960-2005.

The barn, Montague Farm Photo by Roy Finestone, Oct. 1976
The barn, Montague Farm Photo by Roy Finestone, Oct. 1976

Ray Mungo’s Famous Long Ago (1970) and Steve Diamond’s What the Trees Said (1971) are classic visions of late 1960s counterculture and of life in New England communes. The communes on which Mungo and Diamond settled, Packer Corner and the Montague Farm, became the center of what might be considered a single extended community, embracing the Wendell Farm and Johnson Pasture and Tree Frog Farm in Vermont. The Farmers themselves were, and remain, a diverse group, including photographers, novelists, and poets, artists, actors, and activists.

An umbrella collection, the Famous Long Ago Archive contains a growing number of collections relating to the communes at Montague Farm, Packer Corners, Johnson Pasture, Wendell Farm, and Tree Frog Farm. These range from the papers of Steve Diamond, Raymond Mungo, and Jonathan Maslow to Randy Kehler and Betsy Corner (the latter of whom lived at Montague Farm), the records of the Liberation News Service, the Alternative Energy Coalition, and Musicians United for Safe Energy, to the photographic collections of Roy Finestone and Stephen Josephs. View all the Famous Long Ago Collections.

Collections include:

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--Massachusetts
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Communal living--Vermont
  • Johnson Pasture Community (Vt.)
  • Montague Farm Community (Mass.)
  • Packer Corners Community (Vt.)
  • Political activists--Massachusetts