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Results for: “Botany--North Carolina--18th century” (347 collections)SCUA

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Bullard Family

DigitalFinding aid

Bullard Family Scrapbook, 1898-1901.

1 item (0.1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 112

The Bullard family were among the early settlers of New Salem, Massachusetts, a small, rural town incorporated in the western part of the state in 1753.

Assembled by a member of the Bullard family at the turn of the twentieth century, this scrapbook contains an apparently complete set of clippings from a local newspaper column containing community news from the three villages of New Salem, North New Salem, and Millington. The entries cover the usual community news, such as the comings and goings of local residents and visitors to town, community events, and other local news, and a number of well-established New Salem families are represented, including the Ballards, Bullards, Cogswells, Haskells, Paiges, Pierces, and Stowells. The first three pages consist of announcements of births, deaths, and weddings. The original volume has been retained by the family.

Subjects

  • Millington (Mass.)--History
  • New Salem (Mass.)--History
  • New Salem (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • North New Salem (Mass.)--History

Types of material

  • Scrapbooks

Campbell, Sadie

Finding aid

Sadie Campbell Papers, 1812-2002.

19 boxes (10.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 439
Sadie Campbell and sons Harold and Robert Leslie
Sadie Campbell and sons Harold and Robert Leslie

A housewife, mother and active community member, Sadie Campbell was born in 1881 and lived at 1 Depot Street in Cheshire, Massachusetts for most of her life until she died in 1971. Sadie was closely tied to the Cheshire community where she had a large circle of friends and acquaintances, and was active in a a number of organizations, such as: the Cheshire Ladies Reading Club, the Merry Wives of Cheshire Shakespeare Club, and the Cheshire Cash Tearoom.

The collection documents three generations of a western Massachusetts family. The variety and nature of the materials in this collection offer a good view into the local and social history of western Massachusetts through the lives of Sadie Campbell and her family.

Subjects

  • Cheshire (Mass.)--History
  • Cheshire Cash Tearoom
  • Family--Massachusetts--History--19th century
  • Family--Massachusetts--History--20th century
  • Housekeeping--Massachusetts--Cheshire
  • Housewives--Massachusetts--Cheshire
  • Massachusetts--Social life and customs--19th century
  • Merry Wives of Cheshire Shakespeare Club
  • Small business--Massachusetts
  • Tyrell, Augustus
  • Williams Manufacturing Company
  • Women--Societies and clubs--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Campbell, Sadie

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Invitations
  • Letters (Correspondence)
  • Pamphlets
  • Photographs
  • Recipes

Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-

Finding aid

Alexander E. Cance Papers, 1911-1951.

6 boxes (2.75 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 045
Alexander E. Cance
Alexander E. Cance

Professor and Head of the Agricultural Economics Department at the Massachusetts Agricultural College who also worked briefly for Presidents Woodrow Wilson and Herbert Hoover, as well as the United States Department of Agriculture.

Includes biographical materials, correspondence concerning Cance’s role in the agricultural cooperative movement, addresses, articles (both in typescript and published), lectures, book reviews, typescript of a Carnegie study of factors in agricultural economics, a summary of a U.S. Senate report of which he was co-author, “Agricultural Cooperation and Rural Credit in Europe,” and research material. No documentation of his role as a delegate to the Hoover Conference on Economic Crisis, 1920, or his position as Supervisor of Market Research with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, 1922.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural Economics
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Agricultural Economics
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty

Contributors

  • Cance, Alexander E. (Alexander Edmond), 1874-

Cemetery Inscriptions Collection

Finding aid

Cemetery Inscriptions Collection, 1902-2005.

4 boxes (6 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 669

Founded in 1977, the Association for Gravestone Studies (AGS) is an international organization dedicated to furthering the study and preservation of gravestones. Based in Greenfield, Mass., the Association promotes the study of gravestones from historical and artistic perspectives. To raise public awareness about the significance of historic gravemarkers and the issues surrounding their preservation, the AGS sponsors conferences and workshops, publishes both a quarterly newsletter and annual journal, Markers, and has built an archive of collections documenting gravestones and the memorial industry.

Consisting of self-published and limited-run compilations of gravestone transcriptions from historical cemeteries, the AGS Cemetery Inscriptions Collection offers rich documentation of epitaphs and memorial language, with an emphasis on colonial and early national-era in New England and Ohio. The collection is arranged by state and town.

Subjects

  • Gravestones
  • Inscriptions

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies

Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873

Finding aid

Henry James Clark Papers, 1865-1872.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 048
Trichodina pediculus
Trichodina pediculus

The first professor of Natural History at the Massachusetts Agricultural College, Henry James Clark, had one of the briefest and most tragic tenures of any member of the faculty during the nineteenth century. Having studied under Asa Gray and Louis Agassiz at Harvard, Clark became an expert microscopist and student of the structure and development of flagellate protozoans and sponges. Barely a year after joining the faculty at Massachusetts Agricultural College at its first professor of Natural History, Clark died of tuberculosis on July 1, 1873.

A small remnant of a brief, but important career in the natural sciences, the Henry James Clark Papers consist largely of obituary notices and a fraction of his published works. The three manuscript items include two letters from Clark’s widow to his obituarist and fellow naturalist, Alpheus Hyatt (one including some minor personal memories), and a contract to build a house on Pleasant Street in Amherst.

Subjects

  • Developmental biology
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Faculty
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. Department of Veterinary Science
  • Protozoans

Contributors

  • Clark, Henry James, 1826-1873
  • Clark, Mary Young Holbrook
  • Hyatt, Alpheus, 1838-1902

Types of material

  • Contracts
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference

Finding aid

Constitutionalism in American Life Conference Collection, 1986.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 140

A conference hosted by the University of Massachusetts Amherst on November 7-9, 1986, that examined the impact of the Constitution on politics and government, foreign policy, race relations, and the economy, and also discussed the impact on the constitution of popular struggles and the emergence of “rights consciousness.” Includes papers presented at the conference that were to be subsequently published in a special bicentennial issue of the Journal of American History.

Subjects

  • Constitutional history--United States--Congresses
  • Constitutional law--United States--Congresses
  • Journal of American history
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--History

Culley, Margo

Margo Culley Papers, 1973-1985.

1 box (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 103

A former Professor of English at UMass Amherst and contributor to the Program in Women’s Studies, Margaret (Margo) Culley was a specialist in women’s literature, particularly in women’s autobiography and diaries as a literary form. Her research drew variously upon work in literature, history, American studies, and religion, exploring gender and genre, language, subjectivity, memory, cultural diversity, and narrative. Between 1985 and 1994, she edited three volumes on American women’s autobiographical writing, and another on feminist teaching in the college classroom.

The Culley Papers offer a somewhat fragmentary glimpse into Culley’s academic career and her commitments to women’s literature. The collection includes selected notes for research and teaching, annotated bibliographies of women’s literature, a performance script for The Voices of Lost New England Women Writers, a federal grant proposal for The Black Studies/Women’s Studies Faculty Development Project (1981), and notes related to a study on minority women in the classroom. Letters collected by Culley’s students (late 18th and early 19th century) have been separated from the collection and designated as manuscript collections.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Women
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Program in Women's Studies

Contributors

  • Culley, Margo

Delevingne, Lionel

Finding aid

Lionel Delevingne Photograph Collection, ca.1975-1995.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 047
Joan of Seabrook
Joan of Seabrook

Born and raised in France, the photojournalist Lionel Delevingne studied education at l’Ecole Normale in Paris, but settled permanently in the United States in 1975. Based at first in Northampton, Mass., he became a prolific photographer of American social movements while working for the Valley Advocate and other publications, covering the early years of the Clamshell Alliance and the antinuclear movement in considerable depth. His work has been exhibited frequently and published widely in the mainstream and alternative press, including the New York Times, Le Figaro Magazine, Die Zeit, Newsweek, Washington Post Magazine, Mother Jones, and Vanity Fair.

The Delevingne collection includes remarkable visual documentation of the antinuclear movement of the 1970s and beyond, including some of the its most iconic images. Beginning with coverage of the Seabrook occupation, Delevingne covered the movement as it spread throughout the northeastern U.S. and internationally. The collection includes exhibition prints, prints for publication, and digitized images ranging in date from the mid-1970s through 1990s. Copyright in the images has been retained by Delevingne.

Subjects

  • Antinuclear movement--United States
  • Clamshell Alliance
  • Photojournalists
  • Seabrook Nuclear Power Plant (N.H.)

Contributors

  • Delevingne, Lionel

Types of material

  • Photographs

Du Bois Fellowship Recipients

2016

John Hyland (English, University of Buffalo and Haverford College)
“The forest of melody: Black Diasporic Poetics and the Sounding of the Environment”
Nicholas T. Rinehart (English, Harvard University)
“‘These illegitimate children of my thought’: The dramatic work and criticism of W.E.B Du Bois”

2015

Nneka Dennie (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Male Feminism and the Evolution of Du Boisian Thought, 1903-1920”
Crystal Webster (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“‘The Transfiguring Soul of Childhood’: Du Bois and the Social, Political, and Cultural Role of Black Children”

2014

Brandon Byrd (Assistant Professor of History, Mississippi State University and University of North Carolina)
“The Problem of Haiti as it Stands Today:” W.E.B. Du Bois on the U.S. Occupation of Haiti, 1915-1934″
Donald Geesling (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Black Song and the Talented Tenth: The Musical Imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois, 1902-1942″

2013

Horace D. Ballard Jr. (Public Humanities, History of Art, and American Studies, Brown University)
“Ethics and Aesthetics: Citizenship and Form”
Emahunn Raheem Ali Campbell (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“W.E.B. Du Bois’s Literary Interventions on Black Criminality”
Daniel Chard (History, UMass Amherst)
Exploring the history of ’60s-’70s radical groups allows Chard to investigate the origins of the first police institutions in the U.S. dedicated to domestic “counter-terrorism”

2012

J. Anthony Guillory (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“The Physical Uplift of Race”
Desmond Jagmohan (Government, Cornell)
“Creating Community, Cultivating Citizens, and Interrogating Jim Crow: The Political Thought of Booker T. Washington”

2011

Markeysha Davis (Afro-American Studies, UMass Amherst)
“Daring propaganda for the beauty of the Human Mind’:
Redefinition and Reaffirmation of the New Black Self in Poetry and Drama of the 1960s and 1970s”
Ricky Fayne (English, Northwestern)
“‘The Shadow of a Mighty Negro Past': Du Bois and the Re-memory of Africa in to the Black America”

Ege, Otto F., 1888-1951

DigitalFinding aid

Otto F. Ege, "Fifty Original Leaves From Medieval Manuscripts", 12th-14th century.

1 box (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 570
Beauvais Missal
Beauvais Missal

The scholar of book history Otto F. Ege disassembled works from his personal collection of medieval manuscripts to create forty portfolios of fifty leaves each, offering these sets for sale to individuals and institutions under the title “Fifty Original Leaves From Medieval Manuscripts.” Marketing his portfolios as a resource for study of the history of the book, book illustration, and paleography, Ege justified his biblioclastic enterprise as a means of sharing the beauties of Medieval books with a wider audience.

The majority of the texts scavenged for Otto Ege’s “Fifty Original Leaves From Medieval Manuscripts” (all but one in Latin) are liturgical in origin — Bibles, psalters, missals, breviaries, and Books of Hours — however Ege also included a few less common works such as the 15th-century manuscript of Livy’s History of Rome and a version of Thomas Aquinas’s Commentary on the Sentences of Peter Lombard. The leaves range in date from the late twelfth to the early sixteenth century and represent a number of distinctive regional styles in paleography and illumination from throughout western Europe, including Italy, France, Germany, the Low Countries, Switzerland, and England. The UMass Amherst set is number six of 40.

Subjects

  • Manuscripts, Medieval
  • Paleography

Contributors

  • Ege, Otto F., 1888-1951

Types of material

  • Books of hours
  • Breviaries
  • Missals
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