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Parker, Harrison

Harrison Parker's History of Hawley Collection

ca.1970-1995
7 boxes 10.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 532

Named for Joseph Hawley, a local leader in the American Revolution, the town of Hawley was first settled in 1760 by residents of Hatfield, Massachusetts. Situated in Franklin County, Hawley was officially incorporated as a town in 1792. Today the town is host to a few small businesses, farms, and fewer than 500 residents.

The collection consists of copies of manuscripts, publications, and genealogical notes all related to the history of Hawley collected by researcher Harrison Parker.

Gift of the estate of Harrison Parker, June 2006

Subjects

  • Hawley (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Parker, Harrison
Patagonia

Patagonian Rebellion Collection

1921-1965
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 353

In 1921-1922, Chilean workers on sheep ranches in Patagonia rebelled violently against their conditions, egged on by anarchist agitators. Under pressure from Conservatives to act decisively, the Radical government in Buenos Aires ordered the 10th Cavalry Regiment under Hector Benigno Varela to quell the disturbance, which they did with a heavy hand.

The Patagonian Rebellion Collection consists of typescripts and photocopies of materials relating to the suppression of the workers’ revolt of 1921-1922. The most significant items include the official diaries and reports of cavalry officers sent to quell the uprising, but the collection also includes correspondence after the fact, news clippings documenting public reaction, and photocopies of photographs depicting the principle individuals involved and the damage wrought. .

Gift of Robert Potash, 1988
Language(s): Spanish

Subjects

  • Argentina--History
  • Argentina--History--Revolution
  • Varela, Hector B.

Contributors

  • Anello, Alfredo
  • Campos, Pedro E
  • Ibarra, Pedro Vinas

Types of material

  • Diaries
Peckham, Alford S.

Alford S. Peckham Collection

1940s-1990s
6 boxes 9 linear feet
Call no.: MS 707
Image of New England agricultural event
New England agricultural event

Born in Newport, Rhode Island in 1919, Alford S. Peckham attended Rhode Island College, graduating in 1941, before serving in the U.S. Army 1st Division until receiving a medical discharge. For twenty-one years he worked as the manager of public relations for the United Farmers of New England, a cooperative of dairy farmers. His interest and expertise in agricultural history continued even after he left the cooperative for the Federal Reserve Bank in Boston; he was appointed the Massachusetts state agricultural historian in July 1989 and amassed his own collection of historical resources in the hopes of developing a Massachusetts Agricultural History Society. Peckham died on December 20, 2005 in Newport, Rhode Island, his home since his retirement in 1984.

Consisting chiefly of subject files, the Alford S. Peckham Collection covers topics ranging from agricultural history and fairs to dairy farmers and animal rights. Also included are photographs of agricultural events around New England, such as the Massachusetts Dairy Festival (1958), the American Dairy Princess (1961), and the Big E (1950s).

Gift of Sean M. Fisher, DCR Archives, June 2011

Subjects

  • Agriculture--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculture--New England--History
  • Dairy farms--Massachusetts--History
  • Farms--New England--History
Pelczynski, Walter, 1916-2000

Walter Pelczynski Papers

1983
1 envelope 0.25 linear feet
Call no.: MS 148 bd

Walter Pelczynski was a native of Adams, Massachusetts and the second native-born American to be ordained by the Congregation of Marians, which has its roots in Poland. He served as head of the Marians at Eden Hill in Stockbridge, Massachusetts for many years.

Included in this small collection is a photocopy of Pelczynski’s typewritten memoirs, written in 1983, that cover the years 1934 to 1983.

Father Walter Pelczynski, via Rev. Charles Jan Di Mascola and Stanley Radosh, 1987

Subjects

  • Catholic Church--Massachusetts--Stockbridge--History
  • Marian Fathers. St. Stanislaus Kostka Province
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts--Stockbridge
  • Stockbridge (Mass.)--Biography
  • Superiors, Religious--Massachusetts--Stockbridge--Biography

Contributors

  • Pelczynski, Walter, 1916-2000

Types of material

  • Autobiographies
People

Frank Waugh image of woman standing in a field

General inquiries scua@library.umass.edu 413.545.2780
Cox, Robert (Head of Special Collections) rscox@library.umass.edu 413.545.2780
James, Lorraine (Conservation specialist) ljames@library.umass.edu
Kay, Kirstin (Mark H. McCormack Sport Innovation Archivist) kay@library.umass.edu 413.545.6843
Kovacs, Danielle (Curator of Collections) dkovacs@library.umass.edu 413.545.2784
Moore, Anne L. (Special Collections Librarian) amoore@library.umass.edu 413.545.6888
Robinson, Steve (Special Collections Assistant) stever@library.umass.edu 413.545.0274
Rubinstein, Aaron (University and Digital Archivist) arubinst@library.umass.edu 413.545.7963
Spitz, Blake (Archivist) bspitz@library.umass.edu 413.545.6898
White, Caroline (Archivist) cjwhite@library.umass.edu 413.545.9637

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Perkins, Carol A.

Carol A. Perkins Collection

2001-2002
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: PH 033

Carol A. Perkins was born April 25, 1926 in Rochester, N.Y., where she attended Madison High School. Her father, Vernon Perkins, was a World War I Army Air Service photographer in France, and she became interested in photography through his photograph albums. She graduated from a correspondence program at the New York Institute of Photography and graduated from the Rochester Institute of Technology School of Art in 1950. After matriculating from the Rochester General Hospital School of Medical Photography, she was employed at the Toledo Hospital Institute of Medical Research for twenty-two years, and then by the Medical College of Ohio for eleven years. While searching through New England graveyards for her Perkins ancestors, she became interested in gravestone studies and became a member of the Association for Gravestone Studies.

The Carol Perkins Collection consists of 1.5 linear feet of material, primarily color photographs of grave markers in Connecticut, Indiana, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New York, Ohio, Rhode Island, and Vermont. Box 1 has two indices: one alphabetical by deceased’s surnames, and the other alphabetical by state, then town, then cemetery. Box 2 photographs include transcriptions of the deceased’s names, dates of birth/death, and inscriptions, and are organized by state, then town. The collection includes one folder of genealogical material and 20 black & white photographs of markers in England. Photographs taken at AGS conferences include some AGS members and were taken in the following years: 1980, 1981, 1982, 1987, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1993, 1995, 1996, 1997, and 2003.

Subjects

  • Gravestones--Connecticut
  • Gravestones--Indiana
  • Gravestones--Massachusetts
  • Gravestones--Michigan
  • Gravestones--New Hampshire
  • Gravestones--New York
  • Gravestones--Ohio
  • Gravestones--Vermont

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Perkins, Carol A

Types of material

  • Photographs
Phillips, Marie, 1954-

Marie Phillips Collection

1948-2007
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: FS 170
Image of Marie Phillips and Jakie,
Marie Phillips and Jakie,

For many years, the UMass Amherst campus was home to several colonies of feral cats that took up residence in its barns and outbuildings, and beginning with Leo V. Robinson in 1945, a succession of individuals were moved to feed and care for the cats. An alumna and employee in Human Relations, Marie Phillips (BA ’78, MPA ’91) took over as feral cat caretaker between 1991 and 2007, joined by her colleague Meg Caulmare of the English Department, and together they supported the colonies along the Cat Corridor stretching from the rear of Munson Hall to the Queen Anne Horse Barn. With increasing construction on campus and careful rehoming, the feral cat population was gradually reduced on campus until 2014, when the last cats to live in the Horse Barn, Mr. Junie Moon and Rusty, were given a home by Caulmare. Phillips wrote about her experiences with two of the more notable cats on campus, Dadcat and Ashes, in her book Dadcat University (2007).

The Phillips collection offers a visual records of the lives of the feral cats on the UMass Amherst campus. A strong supporter of efforts to preserve the declining Horse Barn, Phillips also accumulated photographs, reports, and research materials on the barn and horses at the university.

Gift of Marie Phillips, July 2015

Subjects

  • Cats--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Feral cats--Massachusetts--Amherst
  • Munson Annex (University of Massachusetts Amherst)
  • Queen Anne Horse Barn (University of Massachusetts Amherst)

Types of material

  • Photographs
Picoult, Jodi, 1966-

Jodi Picoult Papers

1986-2013
53 boxes 40 linear feet
Call no.: MS 791
Image of Jodi Picoult in Botswana, January 2013
Jodi Picoult in Botswana, January 2013

Novelist Jodi Picoult is known for taking on compelling social and ethical issues and weaving them into the works of fiction that have won her a devoted readership. From her first novel, Songs of the Humpback Whale (1992), to her recent bestseller The Storyteller (2013), Picoult has grappled with a range of topics: fractured families, eugenics, school violence, teen suicide, spouse abuse, a child’s legal rights, childhood cancer, gay rights, the death penalty, war criminals, vengeance, justice, faith, the value of life. To Picoult, a passionate researcher, no issue is simple. Through her characters and her stories she engages the complications, considering provocative questions from different angles. Born in 1966, Picoult graduated from Princeton, where she majored in creative writing, and Harvard, where she earned her M.Ed. She and her husband have three grown children and live in Hanover, N.H.

The Jodi Picoult Papers, richly documenting the author’s work process, include research files for Picoult’s novels—correspondence, notes, manuscript pages, and other background material—as well as some drafts, editorial correspondence, clippings, publicity material, early stories, and student material. Also in Special Collections is a comprehensive collection of Picoult’s publications, including the novels in American and foreign-language editions.

Subjects

  • Fiction and reality
  • Fiction--20th century--Stories, plots, etc
  • Fiction--21st century--Stories, plots, etc

Contributors

  • Picoult, Jodi, 1966-
Pictou, Louis, collector

Louis Pictou Mi'kmaq Manuscript

Prior to 1903
1 vol., 140 p. 0.1 linear feet
Call no.: MS 342 bd

The Pictou family were prominent members of the Bear River Band of the Mi’kmaq nation in Nova Scotia during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. Notably, Chief Benjamin Pictou (1830-1931) lived for over a century, witnessing the evolution of the Mi’kmaq economy from hunting, fishing, and trapping to include guiding and attempts at agriculture, and was listed by the anthropologist Frank G. Speck in 1922 as having a hunting allocation near Sporting Lake, southwest of the Bear River.

An extensive, unidentified manuscript written in Mi’kmaq (Micmac) language, using the “hieroglyphic” (pictographic) writing system. At one time, the manuscript was apparently in the possession of Louis Pictou, an “Indian guide” on the Bear River, who stating that the manuscript was written by his “ancestors.”

Language(s): Mi'kmaq

Subjects

  • Indians of North America--Nova Scotia
  • Micmac Indians--Manuscripts

Contributors

  • Pictou, Louis
Pine Beach Association

Pine Beach Association Collection

1922-1980
1 box 0.5 linear feet
Call no.: MS 666
Image of Woman on a zip line at Lake Rohunta, ca.1925
Woman on a zip line at Lake Rohunta, ca.1925

Founded in Athol, Mass., prior to1922, the Pine Beach Association operated a summer resort on the northern end of Lake Rohunta, a 383-acre reservoir owned largely by the Rodney Hunt Company. Recognizing the touristic and recreational opportunities, the Association built Pine Beach into a facility that included the Rohunta Inn (the former Elm Lodge Clubhouse), a restaurant, camping facilities, and a lifeguard-patrolled swimming area with water slides and other recreational facilities, all with the intent of becoming the “leading inland bathing beach of New England.” Although the hurricane of 1938 washed away Rodney Hunt’s dam and hydroelectric station, Pine Beach remained a popular destination, freely available to the company’s employees. In the 1980s, the properties were sold to the not-for-profit Lake Rohunta Beach Association, an association of 15 residential properties.

This small collection contains postcards, photographs, and ephemeral material relating to the Pine Beach Association, concentrated in its early years.

Gift of the Harris family, 2010.

Subjects

  • Athol (Mass.)--History
  • Hotels--Massachusetts--Athol
  • Lake Rohunta (Mass.)
  • Picnics--Massachusetts--Athol
  • Rodney Hunt Machine Company--Employees--Recreation
  • Summer resorts--Massachusetts--Orange
  • Taverns (Inns)--Massachusetts--Athol

Types of material

  • Photographs