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Pagan Association, UMass (Religious Groups) (1989- )
see Portraits (Iconographic Materials) RG-182/2
see also Water Color Paintings (Memorabilia, general) RG-183/5
Pakistani Student Association (PSA) (1996- )
Pan Hellenic Council (1959-1983)
see also Social Union (1872-1940) RG-45/90/S6
Pandemonia (1971-1972)
Panoramic Photos
see Photo Archives Project (PAP) RG-172
Parachute Club, Sport (1975-1995)
Parchment, The Sylvan
see Sylvan Parchment, The (1976) RG-45/00/S11
Parents Day (Official University Committee) (1925)
Parents Newsletter (1962-1968)
Parking and Transportation Council (1972-1975)
see also Traffic and Parking Appeals Board (1972- ) RG-40/2/T7
Parking Appeals Board, Traffic and
see Traffic and Appeals Board (1972- ) RG-40/2/T7
Parking Coordinator, Transportation
see also Transit Service (Student Senate Committee) RG-45/7/T7
Parking Services (1994- ) RG-35/21
Parking Enforcement
see Parking Services RG-35/21
Parking Office
see Parking Coordinator RG-30/20
Parking Services (1994- ) RG-35/21
Parking Services (1994- )
Pass-Fail, ad hoc Sub-Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967)
Patent Review Committee (Faculty Senate, 1986-1987)
Pau, France–UMass Summer School at
see French and Italian Department–Pau, France (UMass Summer School) RG-25/F9
see Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (PAUMA) RG-40/5/P7
see also Professional Staff Organization (PSO) RG-40/5/P7.7
PAUMA Bulletin (1987-1989)
Payroll, Personnel
see Personnel, Payroll (Human Resources Office) RG-35/2
Peace and Justice in the Middle East, UMass Faculty and Staff for (unofficial organization) (1990-1991)
Peace Corps (UMass Training Program, Africa) (1962)
see International Programs RG-6/4/9
Peace in Central America, Faculty and Staff for (unofficial organization)
Peacemakers, UMass (1982-1984)
see also Peacemakers Records (1963-1990) MS309
Peer Sex Education Program RG-30/15/2/2

Pelham Quarry
see Quarry, Pelham (Physical Plant) (1866) RG-36/50/Q8
People for A Socially Responsible University (PSRU)(Student Social Action Group) (1989-1990)
People For Choice (Student Social Action Group) (1989)
People’s Gay Alliance
see Gay Alliance, People’s (Lesbian, Bisexual and Gay Alliance) RG-45/40/G3
People’s Market (1974- )
People’s Market — Collective Works (2002)
see Collective Works (People’s Market) (2002) RG-45/00/C4.9
People’s News-Stand (1975-1977)
see Political Economy Research Instiute (PERI) (1998- ) RG-25/E1.6
Personnel Affairs, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1971)
Personnel and Financial Services, Director of
see Business Office, Director of Personnel and Financial Services RG-35/3
Personnel, Assistant Vice President for Labor Relations
see Assistant Vice President for Labor Relations and Personnel RG-3/17/1
Personnel Office Newsletter (1962, 1966-1968, 1972-1975)
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Classified Employment Opportunities
see Classified Employment Opportunities ("Yellow Sheet") RG-35/2
Personnel-Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Employment Opportunities
see Employment Opportunities ("Beige Sheet") RG-35/2
Personnel/Payroll (Human Resources Office)–Personnel Office Newsletter
see Personnel Office Newsletter RG-35/2
Personnel Policies ad hoc Committee on, Multicampus Academic (1974-75)
see Inter-Campus Committees (2-campus and 3-campus) RG-3/100
Personnel, Vice President for Labor Relations and, Assistant
see Vice President for Labor Relations and Personnel, Assistant RG-3/17/1
Perspectives (Housing Services) (1980-1985)
Pest Control Guide for Commercial Growers in Massachusetts and Connecticut
see Extension Service, Cooperative– Pest Control Guide for Commercial Growers in
Massachusetts and Connecticut (1971-1975) RG-15/8
Pesticide Chemical Information Center
Phi Alpha Theta (Honor Society)
Phi Beta Kappa (Honor Society) (1932- )
Phi Beta Kappa News Bulletin (1937-1965)
see also Key Reporter, The (1936-1963, 1974-1978) RG-40/3/P3
Phi Beta Kappa Visiting Scholar Program
see Phi Beta Kappa RG-40/3/P3
Phi Beta Sigma (1985-1989)
Phi Delta Kappa (1984, 1993)
Phi Eta Sigma (Honor Society)
Phi Kappa Phi (Honor Society) (1904- )
Phi Mu Delta (1980-1993)
Phi Sigma Alpha (Honor Society)
Phi Sigma Delta (1978, 1985)
Phi Sigma Kappa (1873-1973)
Phi Sigma Pi (1996)
Philosophy Department
Phonodiscs (Sound Recordings)
Photo Archives Project (PAP)
Photo Center (Photographic and Motion Picture Services)
Photo Center Slide Collection
Photo Collection, Fred Moore
see Fred Moore Photo Collection RG-173
Photo Negatives Collection
see University Photo Negatives Collection RG-171
Photographer’s Association (1962-1973)
Photographic and Motion Picture Services
see Photo Center (Photographic and Motion Picture Services) RG-5/7
Photographic Services (University Relations and Development)
see Photo Center RG-5/7
RG-100 thru RG-176
Photographs (proof sheets)
see Proof Sheets (photographs) RG-176
Photography Club, University
see Photographer’s Association RG-45/40/P5
Photos, Oversize
see Oversize Photos RG-175
see also Lithographs RG-182/1
Photos, Panoramic
see Panoramic Photos RG-170
Physical Education, Men’s Department
Physical Education, Professional Preparation in
Physical Education, School of
see School of Physical Education RG-18
Physical Education, Women’s Department (WOPE)
Physical Plant (Department)
Physical Plant Department, Director
Physical Plant Publications
see also Mainstay (Physical Plant) (1969-1978) RG-36/00
Physical Plant Subject Files
Physical Sciences Library (1961- )
Physics and Astronomy–Cognitive Development Project
Physics and Astronomy Department
See also collections relating to members of the Physics Department
Physics and Astronomy–Five College Astronomical Society
Physics and Astronomy–Five College Radio and Astronomy Observatory
Physics and Astronomy–Scientific Reasoning Research Institute
Pi Beta Phi (1964-1966)
Pi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) (1988)
Pi Tau Sigma (Honor Society)
Picketing, ad hoc Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967-1971,1987)
Picketing and Recruitment, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1987)
Pierce College (School of Management)
see Phi Kappa Alpha (PIKE) RG-45/90/P5.9
Pistol Team
see Sports-Men’s Pistol Team (1966) RG-18/2
Placement Files (Microfilm)
Placement Service, Career Planning and
see Career Planning and Placement Service RG-30/9/5
see also Placement File (Microfilm) RG-190/1
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Office of Institutional Research and Planning (OIRP) RG-4/3/4
Planning and Budget, Office of
see Office of Planning and Budget (OPB) RG-4/3/3
Planning and Facilities Development, Office of
Planning and Resource Development Series
see Holdsworth Natural Resources Center–Planning and Resource Development Series (#’s 1-28) RG-15/3
Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1970-1980)
see also Campus Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1956-1960, 1974-1975) RG-40/2/A3
Campus Physical Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1974- ) RG-40/2/A3
Master Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1961-1974) RG-40/2/A3
Long Range Planning Committee, ad hoc (Faculty Senate, 1966-1971) RG-40/2/A3
Planning Office (1965- )
Planning, Project
see Director of Business Procedure and Project Planning RG-3/4/5
Planning, Vice President for
see Vice President for Planning RG-3/7
Plans (Cartographic Materials)
Plant and Soil Sciences Department
Plant Biology
Plant Pathology Department
Plant Pathology–Florists’ and Gardeners’ Club
Plaque (Student Publication) (1939)
Plaques (Memorial)
see Memorial Stones and Plaques (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/M4
see also Plaques (Memorabilia, General) RG-183/3
Plaques (Memorabilia, general)
see also Memorial Stones and Plaques RG-36/50/M4
Plato User’s Group Newsletter, UMass
see Massachusetts CAI Consortium Newsletter (1985- ) RG-29/00
Plays, Films and (Posters)
see Films and Plays (Poster Collection) RG-180/4
Poetry Circular (Student Publication) (1963)
Pointers for Pork Profits
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Pointers for Pork Profits (1949, 1954, 1968-1974) RG-15/8
Police Officers, International Brotherhood of
see International Brotherhood of Police Officers (NAGE) RG-40/5/P6
Polish Farmer’s Day (1911-1924)
Political Economy Research Institute (PERI) (1998- )
Political Science Department
Political Science Department–Public Administration, Graduate Program
Polity (Political Science Department) (1968- )
Polo Team
see Sports-Men’s Polo Team (ca. 1896) RG-18/2
Polymer Research
see Center for University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers (CUMIRP) RG-25/P7.5
Polymer Research Institute
see also Polymer Science and Engineering Program RG-25/P7
Polymer Science and Engineering Program
see Plant and Soil Sciences RG-25/P4
Pond, Campus
see Campus Pond and Isle of View (Physical Plant) RG-36/104/P6
Poor Women’s Task Force (Everywoman’s Center)
Population Studies, Certificate Program in
Portraits (Iconographic Materials)
Portuguese Club (1976-1977)
Portuguese Department
see Hispanic Literature and Linguistics RG-25/H4
Post-War Period, Massachusetts State College in the
see Massachusetts State College in the Post-War Period (Official University Committee) (1944) RG-40/2/M4.5
Poster Collection
Poster Collection, Miscellaneous/Art
Poultry Club (1927-1954)
see Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989) RG-45/80/P7
Pow-Wow (Student Publication) (1948)
Precisionettes (Special Student Interest Group) (1946-1965)
Pre-Law Association (1966-1986)
Pre-Medical Society (1982)
President, Selection Committee to Advice on (Faculty Senate, 1969)
President, Selection of a (Official University Committee) (1927, 1932-1933, 1968-1969)
President’s Cabinet
see Cabinet, President’s RG-3/12
Presidents, Individual (1864- ) RG-3/1
see also Presidents (Photographs) RG-110/1
President’s Office
President’s Office, Organization Charts (1967- )
President’s Office, Publications (1948- )
Presidents Photographs
Press, Committee on Faculty Senate (Faculty Senate, 1962- )
Press Information (Commencement)
Press, UMass
see University Press RG-10/4
Principal Investigators, Faculty Group of (1978)
Print Shop (Campus Center)
Printed Materials (Oversize Materials)
Printout (Massachusetts Data, Center for) (1983-1984)
Privacy Task Force
see Committees in Student Affairs–Privacy Task Force RG-30/1/3
Prize Essays
see Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
see Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
Process Design and Control, Center in, Industry/University
see Chemical Engineering Department–Industry/University Center In Process Design and Control RG-25/C2/3
see Design and Production RG-39/6
Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst (PAUMA)
Professional Association of the University of Massachusetts at Amherst–Bulletin (PAUMA)
see PAUMA Bulletin RG-40/5/P7
Professional Employees, Union of
see Union of Professional Employees (UPE) RG-40/5/P8
Professional Personnel, Chancellor’s Committee on (1966-1972)
Professional Preparation in Physical Education
see Physical Education, Professional Preparation in RG-25/P3.3
Professional Schools, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Professional Schools, Associate (1971-1976) RG-6/14
see also Schools themselves RG-12 thru 18
Professional Staff Appeals Committee
Professional Staff Organization (PSO) (1984- )
Professors, American Association of University
see American Association of University Professors (AAUP) RG-40/5/A2
Program and Budget Council of Faculty Senate (Faculty Senate, 1973- )
Program for Gay, Lesbian and Bisexual Concerns (1986- )
see also People’s Gay Alliance RG-45/40/G3
Lesbian Union RG-45/40/L4
Program Groups (Student)
see Fine Arts/program groups (Student) RG-45/45/50
Programs, Academic
see Academic Departments, Programs, Institutes, Centers RG-25
Programs (School of Education) (1967-1977)
Progress Report (Experiment Station, 1888- )
see Experiment Station (1888- )–Progress Report (1962- ) RG-15/2.2
Progressive Candidates Pool
Progressive Organization of Women’s Rights (POWER) (1989-1996)
Progressive Student (Student Publications) (1984)
Project ABLE (Affirmative Business Leadership Education) (School of Management)
Project Bridge (1968)
Project I Can (College of Arts and Sciences) (1992)
Project Pulse
see Student Affairs Research and Education Office (SAREO) RG-30/27
Project STRIDE (Springfield Teacher Recruitment to Increase Diversity In Education (1996- )
Project 10, Inquiry Program
see also Inquiry Program (School of Education) RG-13/4/2/1
Proof Sheets/Contact Sheets (Photographs)
Property and Receiving
Protests and Demonstrations, Student
see Student Protests and Demonstrations RG-45/101
see Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost RG-6/1
Provost, Assistant to the
Provost for Faculty Relations, Associate (1983-1989)
Provost for Professional Schools, Associate (1971-1976)
see also schools themselves RG- 12-18
Provost for Special Programs, Associate (1968-1982)
see also departments RG-25/A-Z
Provost for Undergraduate Education, Associate (1972-1973, 1981- )
Provost for University Outreach, Interim Vice
Provost for Women and Minority Groups, Associate (1968-1981)
see also Affirmative Action Office RG-4/7
Everywoman’s Center RG-7/2
Provost’s Administrative Council
see Deans Council; Provost’s Administrative Council; Academic Deans Meeting (1955-1972) RG-6/2
Provost’s Task Force on Academic Computing
see Computing, Provosts Task Force on Academic (1984-1985) RG-40/2/C6.7
see Pakistani Student Association (PSA) (1996- )
Psi Chi (Honor Society) RG-45/60/P7

see Professional Staff Organization (PSO) (1984- ) RG-40/5/P7.7
see People for a Socially Responsible University (PSRU) (Student Social Action Group) RG-45/80/P5
Psychological Services Center
Psychology Department
Psychology Department–Behavioral Biology, Dept. of
Psychology Department–Cognitive Science Society
Psychology Newsletter (1987- 1990)
Psychometric and Evaluation Research, Laboratory of (School of Education)
Public Administration, Bureau of
see Bureau of Public Administration RG-25/P6.4
Public Administration, Graduate Program in
see Political Science Department–Public Administration, Graduate Program in RG-25/P6
Public Affairs
see also Public Affairs (President’s Office) RG-3/10
Public Affairs (President’s Office)
see also Public Affairs RG-5
Public Affairs, Director of
Public Affairs Publications
Public Art Sites, Galleries and
see Galleries & Public Art Sites (Physical Plant) RG-36/50/G2
Public Health Center, Northeast Regional Environmental
see Northeast Regional Environmental Public Health Center RG-17/1/1
Public Health, Division of
see School of Public Health and Health Sciences RG-17/1
Public Health, Division of–Biopharmaceutical Research Unit
Public Health, Division of–Biostatistics Technical Reports
Public Health, Division of–Newsletter (1984-1987)
Public Health, School of (1989-1993)
see School of Public Health and Health Sciences (1993- ) RG-17
Public Higher Education, Campus Convention on the Future of, Coordinating Committee on the
see Campus Convention on the Future of Public Education, Coordinating Committee on (1995- ) RG-40/3/C2
Public Information (President’s Office)
Public Information, Office of (Public Affairs)
see also Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development, RG-39/1.
Public Manager’s Notebook (1981-1988)
see Institute for Governmental Services (IGS) RG-3/8
Public Policy and Administration, Center for
see Center for Public Policy and Administration (CPPA) (1997- ) RG-25/P6.3
Public Policy Committee (Student Senate) (1986- )
Public-Private Records, Student Affairs Task Force on (1974- )
see Committee in Student Affairs–Privacy Task Force RG-30/1/3
Public Relations, Publications and
see Publications and Public Relations (1954-1956) RG-40/2/P9.2
Public Safety (Department)
see also Campus Safety News RG-30/17
Public Safety Department (Photographs)
Public Safety Monthly Summaries (1973-1990)
Public School Partnership (Five-College Inc. Program)
Public School Students, Tutoring Enrichment Assistance Model for
see Tutoring Enrichment Assistance Model for Public School Students (TEAMS) RG-7/12
Public Service Council (1968)
see Inter-Campus Committees–Public Service Council RG-3/100
Public Service Fund
see Healy Endowment/Public Service Fund (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/2/4
Public Services (Library)
Public Services Office (Library) (1953- )
Public Student Coalition (Student Association) (1976)
Publications (Official University Committee) (1916-1927)
Publications and Broadcast Board, Student (1966, 1969)
Publications and Public Relations (Official University Committee) (1954-1956)
Publications Committee (Faculty Senate, 1970)
Publications Department
Publications Office (Public Affairs)
Publications, Official
see Printed, mimeos, etc. (University as a Whole) RG-1/00
Publications Policy (Official University Committee) (1949-1950)
Publications, Student
see Student Publications RG-45/00
see UMass News (Release) RG-5/3
Publicity (Official University Committee) (1926-1927)
Publicity about UMass (Public Affairs)
Histories and historians ‘ files (1898- ) RG-1 201
Pulse, Project
see Student Affairs Research and Education Office (SAREO) RG-30/27


QTV Fraternity (1869-1997)
Quarry, Pelham (Physical Plant) (1866)
Quarterly, The (1958-1959)
see Collegian Quarterly (1938-1962) RG-45/00/C6.2
Quest Program, The (Chancellor’s Office) (1985- )
Questor (Student Publication) (1974)
Quilt Project, AIDS Memorial
see AIDS Memorial Quilt Project (1992- ) RG-11/20

Janina Smiertka Davenport Papers, 1918-1990

7 boxes (3 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 343
Janina Smiertka, 1934
Janina Smiertka, 1934

Raised in a Polish American family from Greenfield, Mass., Janina Smiertka Davenport was the epitome of a life-long learner. After graduating from Greenfield High School in 1933, Davenport received degrees from the Pratt Institute in Food Management and from the Franklin County Public School for Nurses (1937). In 1938, she began work as a nurse in the U.S. Navy, receiving two special commendations for meritorious service during the Second World War. She continued her formal and informal education later in life, receiving degrees from Arizona State University in 1958 and UMass Amherst in Russian and Eastern European Studies (1982). Davenport died in Greenfield in March 2002.

The Davenport Papers contain a thick sheaf of letters and documents pertaining to her Navy service before and during World War II, along with assorted biographical and genealogical data, materials collected during educational trips to Poland and elsewhere, and approximately one linear foot of family photographs and photo albums.


  • Nurses--Massachusetts
  • Polish Americans--Massachusetts
  • United States. Navy
  • World War, 1939-1945


  • Davenport, Janina Smiertka

Types of material

  • Photographs

L. Sidney Eslinger Collection, 1905-2003

2 boxes (0.5 linear feet)
Call no.: PH 040

Lucille “Sidney” Eslinger was born in Albany, Missouri, on November 9, 1922, the daughter of Delano R. and Alice M. Willoughby Eslinger. After graduating from high school in 1941, Eslinger turned down an opportunity to attend college to work at Caterpillar Tractor Company in Peoria, lll., partly for the opportunity to play for the Caterpillar Dieselettes, the fast-pitch softball team. Through a co-worker, Eslinger developed an interest in history, becoming an active proponent of historic preservation in central Illinois, including graveyards. After retiring from Caterpillar, she and a friend operated a dog grooming business and she was active in the Humane Society. Sidney died in Peoria on August 14, 2011.

The Eslinger Collection contains materials relating to Sidney Eslinger’s interests in gravestone studies, including four books; a research notebook about Springdale Cemetery in Peoria; a photo album of Old Peoria State Hospital; correspondence and miscellaneous materials about stone quarries and symbolism; and a photo scrapbook, “Coin Harvey: A Legend in His Time.” States represented include Illinois and Indiana.


  • Gravestones--Illinois
  • Gravestones--Indiana
  • Monte Ne (Ark.)
  • Old Peoria State Hospital
  • Springdale Cemetery (Peoria, Ill.)


  • Eslinger, L. Sidney (Lucille Sidney)

Types of material

  • Photographs

Genealogists are the largest single group of researchers using the Friends records, but they often meet with frustration. One common misconception is that these records are neatly organized and indexed. While William W. Hinshaw’s Encyclopedia of American Quaker Genealogy provided thorough indexes for the records of many yearly meetings, including New York, Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Pennsylvania and North Carolina, the New England records have never been completely indexed. The only access to information on New England Friends is usually through a search of the records, either on microfilm or in the original. Here are some important points to remember for typical genealogical problems.

  1. It is important to know both place and time. If an individual moved around New England, it will be very helpful to sketch out a chronology of their travels.
  2. All vital records are recorded by the Monthly Meeting. You will need to determine which monthly meetings your ancestor belonged to. If there is no monthly meeting named after their town, look it up in the index in the back of this book. The town may have held smaller meetings that were part of a larger nearby monthly meeting.
  3. If their town is not indexed, examine the maps on pages 12 to 14 of this guide. Were there any meetings nearby? Until the age of automobile travel, it is unlikely that many practicing Friends lived more than a few miles away from at least a worship group. Even if they did maintain the “Discipline” of Friends in a distant town, their vital records would prob- ably not be recorded by a Monthly Meeting.
  4. If a probable Monthly Meeting can be determined, look at that meeting’s entry in the monthly meeting section. Check for vital records in the listing at the bottom of this entry. Are there any birth, death, marriage or membership records? Removals and denials are also useful (see glossary). Minutes are less useful for genealogy, but sometimes include marriage information, and occasionally memorials to the deceased.
  5. If the records that you want have been microfilmed, this will be indicated in the last column: “Film#”. This is the microfilm number at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library. An asterisk indicates that it can also be found at the Maine Historical Society Library, and a plus sign indicates that it can be ordered from the Family History Centers operated by the Latter-Day Saints (Mormons). An @ symbol indicates that the film is available through the Nantucket Historical Association.
  6. If the records have not been microfilmed, you will need to consult the original. The location of originals is given in the “Loc.” column. Most of them are on deposit at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library, which houses the official Archives of New England Yearly Meeting.
  7. If you are researching early Friends (pre-Revolutionary), it is likely that you will not discover anything new in the vi- tal records. Friends records have always been a major resource for colonial genealogy, and have been consulted for most of the major reference works that you have already looked at. It is, however, possible to find new information in meeting minutes, to verify membership or residence in a location.

For further information, Our Quaker Ancestors: Finding Them in Quaker Records by Ellen Thomas Berry and David Allen Berry (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1987) is a book-length treatment of general approaches to Quaker genealogy.

The Records of the New England Yearly Meeting of Friends (NEYM) offer rich documentation of three and half centuries of Quakers in our region and the culture in which they lived. The heart of the collection are the records of the Yearly Meeting itself, but most Quarterly and Monthly meetings are represented as are some Quaker schools and other organizations, and there is a substantial library of Quaker books and periodicals, including the libraries of Moses and Obadiah Brown.

This volume is a guide for any researcher interested in the records of the Religious Society of Friends (Quakers) in New England. In addition to providing a comprehensive list of the official records created by New England Quakers, it also gives a brief history of each meeting.

The bulk of the guide is arranged by meeting. To use it, a basic understanding of the administrative structure of the Society of Friends would be very helpful. The largest body is the Yearly Meeting. For many rather confusing reasons, there have been several different yearly meetings active in New England. The largest, New England Yearly Meeting, has covered almost the entire region since 1661. The yearly meeting has been composed of quarterly meetings since the early 18th century. They in turn are composed of monthly meetings, which are the basic administrative unit of the Society of Friends. Almost all of the membership information is recorded on the monthly meeting level. The monthly meeting is sometimes subdivided into smaller meetings: preparative meetings, which prepare business for the monthly meetings; and meetings for worship, which generally create no records.

The records of the yearly meetings appear first in this guide, then the quarterly meetings, then monthly meetings. There are no separate entries for preparative meetings or meetings for worship; they are discussed under the appropriate monthly meeting.

The entries for each meeting include the following information:

Name. If a meeting changed names over the years, only one entry is made, under the name the meeting held for the longer time. “See…” references are made under all other known names. If two meetings merged to form a new meeting, all three are given entries. If the name of one of the merging meetings was retained, however, it is not given a new entry.

Place. The place given is the town the monthly meeting was based in for most of its life. It is mainly provided to give a general idea of a meeting’s region; many meetings met on a rotating basis in several locations. For quarterly meetings, the states which it covers are listed. This can help narrow down a search for a specific area.

A brief history of the meeting. For monthly meetings, this history will generally describe the meetings for worship that preceded the monthly meeting, tell where the meeting was set off from, list name changes, and describe which monthly meetings were set off or joined to the meeting. The history will also try to explain any confusing circumstances regarding the structure of the meeting. However, the histories generally make no effort to explain where the meetings met, or when meeting houses were built. Nor do these histories describe prominent members or dramatic events. This would be impossible to do well in a volume of this size. Published histories are available for many of the older meetings, and these are mentioned in the notes when possible.

Quarterly meetings (given only for monthly meetings). Since 1705, all monthly meetings in N.E.Y.M. have been con- stituent parts of a quarterly meeting. Before 1699, they were direct constituents of the Yearly Meeting.

Constituent meetings. Many different sorts of smaller meetings are listed here. This information is provided mainly as a way to determine where residents of a certain town may have attended monthly meeting at a specific date. The information is somewhat unreliable, especially regarding dates.

Formally constituted preparative meetings met for business, and reported monthly to their monthly meetings. Their dates, except in very early meetings, are generally easy to discern from monthly meeting minutes. Sometimes, a monthly meeting would have only one preparative meeting, or none. Generally, preparative meetings named after their monthly meetings are not listed. One problem is that there was no formal provision for preparative meetings between 1901 and 1950. Many preparative meetings continued to meet for business during this time, usually under the heading of “particular meeting”, and are listed as preparative meetings.

Other sorts of meetings may or may not have been formally connected to their monthly meetings, and include particular meetings, meetings for worship, indulged meetings, worship groups, allowed meetings and midweek meetings. No attempt has been made to distinguish between these types of meetings, which are all listed as “W.G”. The dates are often impossible to determine, as they kept no records, and monthly meetings have not always kept track of their existence. However, they are important, being at the center of the spiritual life of Friends. Generally, any meeting for business is also a meeting for worship, but is not listed separately as such.

Records. These tables show all the records of each meeting known to be in existence. For many of the newer meetings, no records have yet been sent to the archives; as a rule, very recent records can often be obtained only through the clerk of the meeting. The records are arranged in the following order: men’s minutes; women’s minutes; joint minutes; rough minutes; vital records; ministry and counsel or equivalent; committee records; miscellaneous loose papers; newsletters.

The information given includes the type of record, the dates covered by each record, the quantity, the location of the original, and the microfilm number (if any). See the glossary and list of abbreviations for details. All of the records with microfilm numbers are available on film at the Rhode Island Historical Society Library. In addition, those with asterisks are available at the Maine Historical Society, those with plus signs are available through the Family History Centers, and those with an @ symbol can be found at the Nantucket Historical Association. In some cases, records have been missing for many years, have never been sent to the Archives, and are presumed to be irretrievably lost; an effort have been made to show this. Researchers should know that meeting minutes are generally closed for a period of twenty years before being open to the public, except for the printed Yearly Meeting minutes.

Charles Taylor Collection, 1731-1904

(5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 104

Collection of historical documents compiled by Charles Taylor, author of the 1882 town history of Great Barrington, Massachusetts. Includes Court of Common Pleas cases, deeds, estate papers, indentures, land surveys, sheriff’s writs, town history reference documents, Samuel Rossiter’s financial papers, and genealogical research papers for over 40 families.


  • Debt--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Farm tenancy--Massachusetts--Great Barrington
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--Genealogy
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--History
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Great Barrington (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Land use--Massachusetts--Great Barrington


  • Ives, Thomas
  • Kellogg, Ezra
  • Pynchon, George
  • Pynchon, Walter
  • Root, Hewitt
  • Rossiter, Samuel
  • Taylor, Charles J. (Charles James), 1824-1904

Types of material

  • Deeds
  • Genealogies
  • Land surveys
  • Writs

Beth Hapgood Papers, 1789-2005

67 boxes (35 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 434
Beth Hapgood and members of the Brotherhood, ca.1969
Beth Hapgood and members of the Brotherhood, ca.1969

Daughter of a writer and diplomat, and graduate of Wellesley College, Beth Hapgood has been a spiritual seeker for much of her life. Her interests have led her to become an expert in graphology, a student in the Arcane School, an instructor at Greenfield Community College, and a lecturer on a variety of topics in spiritual growth. Beginning in the mid-1960s, Hapgood befriended Michael Metelica, the central figure in the Brotherhood of the Spirit (the largest commune in the eastern states during the early 1970s) as well as Elwood Babbitt, a trance medium, and remained close to both until their deaths.

The Hapgood Papers contain a wealth of material relating to the Brotherhood of the Spirit and the Renaissance Community, Metelica, Babbitt, and other of Hapgood’s varied interests, as well as 4.25 linear feet of material relating to the Hapgood family.


  • Brotherhood of the Spirit
  • Channeling (Spiritualism)
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Graphology
  • Hapgood family--Correspondence
  • Massachusetts--Social life and customs--20th century
  • Mediums--Massachusetts
  • Nineteen sixties--Social aspects
  • Occultism--Social aspects
  • Popular culture--History--20th century
  • Renaissance Community
  • Rock music--1971-1980
  • Warwick (Mass.)--History


  • Babbitt, Elwood, 1922-
  • Boyce, Neith, 1872-1951
  • Hapgood, Beth--Correspondence
  • Hapgood, Charles H
  • Hapgood, Elizabeth Reynolds
  • Hapgood, Hutchins, 1869-1944
  • Hapgood, Norman, 1868-1937
  • Metelica, Michael

Aurin F. Hill Papers, 1885-1929

8 boxes (6 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 579
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,<br />ca.1928
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,

The self-styled “insane architect” Aurin F. Hill (b. 1853) was a free thinking carpenter and architect in Boston who waged a concerted campaign for his vision of social reform at the turn of the twentieth century. A Spiritualist, social radical, and union man, Hill carried the torch for issues ranging from the nationalization of railroads and corporations to civil rights and women’s rights, and joined in opposition to vaccination, Comstockery and censorship, capital punishment, and lynching. A writing medium, married to the Spiritual evangelist Izetta Sears-Hill, he became President of the National Spiritual Alliance in 1915, a Spiritualist organization based in Lake Pleasant, Mass.

Esoteric, rambling, and often difficult to follow, the Hill papers provide profound insight into the eclectic mind of an important Boston Spiritualist and labor activist at the turn of the twentieth century. Whether written as a diary or scattered notes, a scrapbook, essays, or letters to the editor, Hill’s writings cover a wide range of topics, from spirit influence to labor law, from his confinements for insanity to police strikes, hypnotism, reincarnation, and housing. More than just a reflection of one man’s psychology, the collection reveals much about broader social attitudes toward gender and race, sexuality, urban life, politics, and religion, and the collection is a particularly important resource for the history of the American Spiritualist movement between 1890 and 1920.


  • Architects--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Boston (Mass.)--History
  • Carpenters--Labor unions
  • Hypnotism
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Lake Pleasant (Mass.)--History
  • Mediums--Massachusetts
  • Montague (Mass.)--History
  • National Spiritual Alliance
  • Spiritualism
  • United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America


  • Hill, Aurin F.
  • Sears-Hill, Izetta B.

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Scrapbooks

Howe Family Papers, 1730-1955

7 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 019

Personal, business, and legal papers of the Howe family of Enfield and Dana, Massachusetts, including correspondence between family members, genealogies, account books and printed materials. Account books record transactions of various family members whose occupations included general storekeeper, minister, printer, postmaster, telephone exchange and gas-station owner, and document the transactions of community businesses and individuals, some of whom were women involved in the beginnings of the local palm leaf hat and mat industry.


  • Bookkeeping--History--Sources
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Biography
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Enfield (Mass.)--History
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Howe family--Genealogy
  • Moneylenders--Massachusetts--Enfield--History
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
  • Swift River Valley (Mass.)--History
  • Swift River Valley (Mass.)--Social life and customs


  • Howe, Donald W. (Donald Wiliam), 1982-1977
  • Howe, Edwin H., 1859-1943
  • Howe, Henry Clay Milton, b. 1823
  • Howe, John M.
  • Howe, John, 1783-1845
  • Howe, Theodocia Johnson, 1824-1898

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Business records
  • Deeds
  • Genealogies
  • Scrapbooks
  • Wills

Howland Family Papers, 1727-1886 (Bulk: 1771-1844)

2 boxes (0.75 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 923

The Howland family of East Greenwich, R.I., figured prominently in New England Quakerism during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries and contributed to the state’s public affairs. Brothers Daniel (1754-1834), an approved minister, and Thomas Howland (1764-1845), an educator, were active members of the Society during the tumultuous years between the 1780s and 1840s, caught up in the moral demands for a response to slavery and other social issues and in the divisions wrought by evangelical influences.

Centered largely on the lives of Thomas Howland, his brother Daniel, and Daniel’s son Daniel, the Howland collection is an important record of Quaker life in Rhode Island during trying times. As meeting elders, the Howlands monitored and contributed to the era’s major controversies, and the collection is particularly rich in discussions of the impact of slavery and the passionate struggle between Friends influenced by the evangelically-inclined Joseph John Gurney and the orthodox John Wilbur. Thomas’ complex response to his commitment to the antislavery cause and his fear of disrupting meeting unity is particularly revealing. Also of note is a series of responses from monthly meetings to queries on compliance with Quaker doctrine, obtained during the decade after the American Revolution.


  • Antislavery movements--Rhode Island
  • East Greenwich (R.I.)--History
  • Peace movements--Rhode Island
  • Temperance--Rhode Island


  • Bassett, William, 1803-1871
  • Brown, Moses, 1738-1836
  • Friends' Boarding School (Providence, R.I.)
  • Gurney, Joseph John, 1788-1847
  • Howland, Daniel
  • Howland, Daniel, 1754-1834
  • Howland, Thomas, 1764-1845
  • Moses Brown School
  • New England Yearly Meeting of Friends
  • Shearman, Abraham, 1777-1847
  • Society of Friends--Controversial literature
  • Society of Friends--History
  • Tobey, Samuel Boyd, 1805-1867
  • Wilbur, John, 1774-1856
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