Results for: “World War, 1914-1918--Medical care” (398 collections)SCUA

University of Massachusetts Amherst. College of Engineering

University of Massachusetts Amherst. College of Engineering, 1938-2007.

(17 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 014

As early as 1867, Massachusetts Agricultural College offered engineering courses in surveying and the construction of roads and bridges — practical skills that would be valuable to farmers. After the establishment of a separate Department of Agricultural Engineering in 1914, and merger with the Department of Mathematics and Civil Engineering in 1938, UMass began to offer broader education in engineering. The Division of Engineering was created in 1945 to coordinate the expected post-war expansion. Since 1985, the College of Engineering has been organized in four academic departments: Chemical Engineering, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Electrical and Computer Engineering, and Mechanical and Industrial Engineering.

This record group documents the varied efforts to provide an applied technical education to students at UMass and its predecessors. In addition to the College’s annual reports and records of the Executive Council and Engineering Research Council; curriculum and program materials; reports and publications; the record group includes materials from the first four deans of the College of Engineering.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. College of Engineering

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Division of Continuing Education

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Continuing Education, 1970-2007.

(36 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 007

The Division of Continuing Education was established in 1970 as the de facto academic outreach arm of the University. Designed to improve access to the academic resources of the University for part-time students, this entailed both the development of a specialized admissions process and an integrated counseling, advising, registration, and records operation geared to the needs of part-time students. The Division continues to provide specialized services and programming for part-time students including Tutoring Enrichment Assistance Model for Public School Students (TEAMS) and the Arts Extension Service, which acts as a catalyst between the fine arts resources of the University and the people in the Commonwealth.

The record group documents the activities of the Division of Continuing Education (1970-2007), Everywoman’s Center — including the Women of Color Leadership Network (1971-2007), and the University Conference Services (1906-2007).

Subjects

  • Continuing education

Contributors

  • Everywoman's Center
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Arts Extension Service
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Division of Continuing Education
  • Women of Color Leadership Network

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Isenberg School of Management

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Isenberg School of Management, 1954-2007.

(11 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 011

Business courses were first offered at the Massachusetts Agricultural College in the early years of the twentieth century, expanding rapidly during the 1930s and 1940s in response to student demand. The Board of Trustees established the School of Business Administration in 1947, and within seven years, it was conferring graduate degrees, including doctorates after 1967. In 1998, the School was renamed the Eugene M. Isenberg School of Management.

The record group consists of annual reports, deans’ records, correspondence, committee reports, long-range planning, self-study reports, proposals, research reports, faculty reprint series, lists of faculty publications, general publications, brochures, seminar information, newsletters, newsclippings and other related materials.

Subjects

  • Business schools--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Isenberg School of Management

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Research and Graduate Studies

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Research and Graduate Studies, 1984-2007.

(1 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 009

The record group includes publications, organizational charts, and files from the Office of the Vice Chancellor for Research and the Dean of Graduate Studies.

Subjects

  • Graduate students--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Graduate School

University of Massachusetts Amherst. University Outreach

University of Massachusetts Amherst. University Outreach, 2000-2007.


Call no.: RG 016

Helping to fulfill its land grant mission, outreach at UMass Amherst engages the university with the community in economic, social, cultural, environmental, and educational issues. Outreach applies the teaching, research, and knowledge resources of the university with benefit to the public throughout the Commonwealth, nation, and world. The office operates a number of programs, including Continuing & Professional Education, the Extension and Arts Extension Service, the University Without Walls, and WFCR radio.

The records of University Outreach document the initiatives originating with the Vice Chancellor for University Outreach. As a result of the evolution of responsibility for outreach activities, the records of individual programs may be located elsewhere in the archives.

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of University Outreach

Unzicker, Rae

Rae Unzicker Papers, 1979-1997.

1 box (1.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 818
Rae Unzicker
Rae Unzicker

Rae Unzicker’s exposure to the psychiatric system began at a young age. Growing up in an abusive home, her parents sent her to psychiatrists off and on for years before she was involuntarily committed. While there, she was quickly introduced to the chaotic and damaging atmosphere of a psychiatric institution, exposing her to mandatory drugs, seclusion rooms, forced feeding, and work “therapy” that required her to wash dishes six hours a day. Once she was release, Unzicker’s road to recovery was long, but after several suicide attempts and stays at other treatment facilities, she ultimately counted herself–along with her friend Judi Chamberlin, an early leader in the movement–a psychiatric survivor. Like Chamberlin, Unzicker embraced her role as an advocate of patient’s rights and for the radical transformation of the mental-health system. In 1995, President Clinton appointed her to the National Council on Disability; two years later she was elected president of the National Association for Rights Protection and Advocacy (NARPA). Unzicker was widely known for her public appearances, conferences and speeches, and her writings, including numerous articles and contributions to the book Beyond Bedlam: Contemporary Women Psychiatric Survivors Speak Out. A survivor of cancer of the jaw and breast, Rae Unzicker died at her home in Sioux Falls, South Dakota on March 22, 2001 at the age of 52.

Although a small collection, Rae Unzicker’s papers document her activities as a leading advocate for the rights of mental health patients, including transcripts of speeches and videotaped appearances, correspondence and feedback related to workshops and conferences, press kits, and newspaper clippings. The most important materials, however, are her writings. It is through her poems and her full-length memoir, You Never Gave Me M & M’s, that Unzicker’s story and voice are preserved.

Subjects

  • Antipsychiatry
  • Ex-mental patients
  • People with disabilities--Civil rights
  • People with disabilities--Legal status, laws, etc.

Contributors

  • Unzicker, Rae

Types of material

  • Memoirs
  • Videotapes

Urban League of Springfield (Mass.)

Urban League of Springfield Records, 1972-1975.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 150

Founded in 1914, the Urban League of Springfield is a community development and service agency working to secure equal opportunity for minority groups in such fields as employment, education, housing, health, and personal welfare.

The collection identifies issues and activities the league was involved in during the mid-1970s, including two surveys they conducted: racial attitudes in Springfield and voting behavior in the city.

Subjects

  • Springfield (Mass.)--History
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Springfield (Mass.)--Race relations

Contributors

  • Urban League of Springfield (Mass.)

Urbana Wine Company

Urbana Wine Company Records, 1881-1911.

6 boxes (9 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 660
Urbana Wine Co. document
Urbana Wine Co. document

Founded by John W. Davis, H.H. Cook, A.J. Startzer and others in 1865, the Urbana Wine Company was among the earliest and most successful wineries in the Finger Lakes region of New York. Organized in Hammondsport, N.Y., the center of the eastern wine industry, Urbana’s claim to fame was its widely popular Gold Seal Champagne and other sparkling wines and along with Walter Taylor, they dominated regional wine production during the Gilded Age. The winery survived passage of Prohibition in 1919 , both World Wars operating under the Gold Seal label, but was closed by its parent company, Seagrams, in 1984.

The Urbana Records are concentrated in the period 1881-1885, as the company was growing rapidly. Among other materials, the collection includes a range of correspondence, receipts, some financial records, and tallies of grapes. Additional material on the company is located in Cornell University’s Eastern Wine and Grape Archive.

Subjects

  • Grapes
  • Viticulture
  • Wine industry--New York

Contributors

  • Urbana Wine Company

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Enfield (Quabbin) dancers
How they danced in Enfield, a Quabbin town

Special Collections and University Archives is open at no cost to researchers, regardless of affiliation, during normal business hours. SCUA staff are happy to assist in planning or conducting research and welcome inquiries from students interested in internships in archival and library studies.

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Volbach, Walther R. (Walther Richard), 1897-

Walther R. Volbach Papers, 1897-1996.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 087
Walther R. Volbach
Walther R. Volbach

Born in Mainz, Germany on December 24, 1897, the theater historian and stage director Walther R. Volbach began directing operas and plays at the age of 17. After his immigration to the United States in 1936, he worked for several colleges, coming to the University of Massachusetts Amherst for five years as a visiting professor following his retirement in 1965. Noted as a director of operas and plays and for his set design, Volbach was author of three books: The Problems of Opera Production (1953), Adolphe Appia : The Prophet of The Modern Theatre (1968), and Memoirs of Max Reinhardt’s Theaters (1972).

The Volbach collection includes personal and professional correspondence in English and German, mostly from Volbach’s later years, regarding family, publishing, lectures, and employment. The collection also includes photographs of set designs, an image of Volbach teaching a class, publications, and lecture and research notes on theater history.

Subjects

  • Appia, Adolphe, 1862-1928
  • Drama--Study and teaching
  • Set designers
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Theater

Contributors

  • Volbach, Walther R. (Walther Richard), 1897-
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