Results for: “Amesbury (Mass.)--Officials and employees--History--18th century” (716 collections)SCUA

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Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Kenyon Leech Butterfield Papers, 1889-1945.

(12 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 B88
Kenyon L. Butterfield
Kenyon L. Butterfield

An agricultural and educational reformer born in 1868, Kenyon Butterfield was the ninth president of Massachusetts Agricultural College and one of the university’s most important figures. An 1891 graduate of Michigan Agricultural College and recipient of MA in Economics and Rural Sociology from the University of Michigan (1902), Butterfield entered university administration early in his career, becoming President of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1903 and, only three years later, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Possessed of a Progressive spirit, Butterfield revolutionized the college during his 18 years in Amherst, expanding and diversifying the curriculum, quadrupling the institutional budget, fostering a dramatic increase in the presence of women on campus and expanding the curriculum, and above all, helping to promote the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and developing the Cooperative Extension Service into a vital asset to the Commonwealth. Nationally, he maintained a leadership role in the field of rural sociology and among Land Grant University presidents. After leaving Amherst in 1924, Butterfield served as President at Michigan Agricultural College for four years and was active in missionary endeavors in Asia before retiring. He died at his home in Amherst on Nov. 25, 1936.

The Butterfield Papers contain biographical materials, administrative and official papers of both of his presidencies, typescripts of his talks, and copies of his published writings. Includes correspondence and memoranda (with students, officials, legislators, officers of organizations, and private individuals), reports, outlines, minutes, surveys, and internal memoranda.

Subjects

  • Agricultural education--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural education--Michigan--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--United States--History--Sources
  • Agriculture--United States--History--Sources
  • Education--United States--History--Sources
  • Food supply--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Higher education and state--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Michigan Agricultural College--History
  • Michigan Agricultural College. President
  • Rural churches--United States--History--Sources
  • Rural development--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Women--Education (Higher)--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Concordance for the Archives, U

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

U

UAASC
see Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- ) RG-6/7
UALRC
see United Asia Learning Resource Center RG-25/U5
U-ARTS
see Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) RG-45/40/U5
UCC
see Computer Center RG-29
UCF
see United Christian Foundation (UCF) RG-30/12
UCS
see Computer Center RG-29
UCS Notes (Computer Center Publication) (1990)
RG-29/00/4
UES
see University of El Salvador (UES) RG-60/3
UFF
see University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- ) RG-50/7/1
UIS Newsletter (Data Processing Center) (1987- )
RG-35/7
UMAGRAFFITI (Student Publication)
RG-45/00/U4
UMass (News Office) (1983-1984)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS (1996- ) (News Office)
RG-5/00/12
see also Massachusetts (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
UMASS (University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service (1982-1989)
RG-25/A6/00
UMASS 1983 and UMASS 1984 (Public Affairs)
RG-5/00/7
UMASS Alumni Connection, The
see Alumni Connection, The UMass (1992-1994) RG-50/00/3
UMass Alumni News and Views (1978-1983)
RG-50/00/3
UMass Amherst Globe, The (International Programs) (1993- )
RG-6/4/9/2
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Answers (Continuing Education) (1982- )
RG-7/00
UMass Around the Globe (1992- )
RG-39/9
UMass Boston
RG-55/3
UMass Boston Planning and Establishment (pre-1965)
RG-55/3/1
UMass Dartmouth
see Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU) RG-55/5
UMass Educational Television (UMET)
RG-13/1/3
UMass Faculty and Staff for Peace and Justice in the Middle East
see Peace and Justice in the Middle East, UMass Faculty and Staff for RG-40/3/P1
UMass Greens (1989)
RG-45/80/U4
UMass Hunger Task Force
see Hunger Task Force, UMass RG-45/40/H8
UMass Information Technology Services (formerly University Information Systems)
RG-35/7
UMass Interaction (1994- )
RG-3/00
UMass Labor Council (1995- )
RG-40/5/U5
UMass Lowell
see University of Lowell RG-55/4
UMass Majors (catalog)
see CASIAC RG-11/5
see also Admissions RG-30/5
UMass News (News Office)
RG-5/3
UMass Nutrient Data Bank
see Food Science and Nutrition, Department of–Nutrient Data Bank, UMass RG-25/F5/3
UMass 125th Anniversary Slide Show (1988)
RG-187/1
UMass Peacemakers
see Peacemakers, UMass (1982-1987) RG-45/80/P4
see also Peacemakers Records (1963-1990) MS309
UMass Plato User’s Group Newsletter
see Massachusetts CAI Consortium Newsletter (1985- ) RG-29/00
UMass Program at Freiburg
see Freiburg, UMass Program at RG-25/F8
U-Mass Tenant Association (UMTA)
RG-35/12/3
UMass Worcester
see Medical School, Worcester RG-55/2
U-Math Newsletter (1981)
RG-25/M5/00
UMET
see UMass Educational Television (UMET) RG-13/1/3
UMPSO
see Pagan Association, UMass RG-45/70/P3
UMTA
see UMass Tenant Association (UMTA) RG-35/12/3
UMTC
see University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (1994- ) RG-25/U4
Undergrad, The (Business Club) (1974-1976)
RG-12/4
Undergraduate Admissions Task Force (1999- )
RG-40/2/U2
Undergraduate Advising and Academic Support Center (UAASC) (1997- )
RG-6/7
Undergraduate Art Students Association (U-ARTS) (1987)
RG-45/40/U5
Undergraduate Course of Study Committee (Faculty Senate, 1960-1963)
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Curriculum Study Committee’s Project (Faculty Senate, 1996- )
RG-40/2/A3
Undergraduate Education, Associate Provost for
see Provost for Undergraduate Education, Associate (1972-1973, 1981- ) RG-6/10
Undergraduate Journal
RG-45/00/U5
Undergraduate Retention Committee (Official University Committee) (1992)
RG-40/2/U4
see also Retention Committee (1985- ) RG-40/2/R5
Unification Church of America (Religious Group) (1981-1984)
RG-45/70/U5
Union, Credit
see Credit Union RG-40/5/C7
Union of Professional Employees
see Union of Professional Employees (UPE) MS-47
Union of Student Employees (1975-1976) RG-45/45/U5
Union Program Council
RG-45/17
Union, Radical Student
see Radical Student Union RG-45/80/R1
Union, Social
see Social Union RG-45/90/S6
Union Video Center (Student Video Project) (1972)
RG-45/30/U5
Unions and Associations
RG-45/45
Unionization, Student
see Student Unionization (Association) RG-45/45/S7
Unions and Associations (Faculty and Staff)
RG-40/5
Unions and Associations (Student Body)
RG-45/45
Unions, Employees
see Unions and Associations RG-40/5
United Asia House (1989)
RG-45/40/U6
see also United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990) RG-25/U5
United Asia Learning Resource Center (UALRC) (1990)
RG-25/U5
see also United Asia House (1989) RG-45/40/U6
United Christian Foundation (UCF)
RG-30/12
United States Student Association (USSA) (1983-1988)
RG-45/80/U5
Universities, State
see Land-Grant Colleges, State Universities RG-60/1
University Advancement
see University Relations and Development RG-39
University Affairs Committee (Faculty Senate, 1965-1972)
RG-40/2/A3
University as a Whole
RG-1
University as a Whole–Publications
RG-1/00
University Bulletin (1973-1977)
RG-5/00/6
see also Weekly Bulletin, University Bulletin (1953-1971) and Executive Bulletin RG-5/00/3
University Career Center
see Career Center, University RG-30/9/5
University Center for Community College Affairs
see Higher Education, Center for RG-13/3/19/4
University Center for Economic Development (1977- )
RG-6/4/14/2
see also Economic Development, Center for RG-12/12
University China Committee
see China Committee, University RG-40/2/C4
University Chorale
see Singing Clubs–University Chorale RG-25/M9.5
University College (Official University Committee) (1966-1967)
RG-40/2/U5
University College Planning Committee (Faculty Senate, 1966)
RG-40/2/A3
University Committee on AIDS
see AIDS, University Committee on RG-40/2/A5.5
University Committee on Alcohol Use
see Alcohol Use, University Committee on (Official University Committee) RG-40/2/A6
University Committees, Official
see Official University Committees RG-40/2/A1-W6
University Community Service Council (1993- )
RG-40/2/U6
University Computer Service Newsletter
see UCS Notes RG-29/00/4
University Computing Center
see Computer Center RG-29
University Computing Services
see Computer Center RG-29
University Conference Services
RG-7/3
University Counsel
RG-4/16
University Day School
see School RG-25/H9
University Democrats (Student Social Action Group) (1989- )
RG-45/80/U6
University Directions
see Handbooks (Student Affairs) RG-30/00/2
University Faculty Senate, ad hoc Committee
see Faculty Senate, University, ad hoc Committee on (Official University Committee) (1955) RG-40/2/F2
University Fund for the Future (UFF) (1989- )
RG-50/7/1
University Gallery
see Art Gallery RG-11/15
University Guide Service
see ARCON (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
see also University Tour Service (1984- ) RG-30/4/1
University Historical Collection
RG-1/200-299
University History Committee
see History Committee, University (125th Anniversary, 1986-1987) RG-40/2/H5
see also Campus Awareness Committee (1986- ) RG-40/2/C.5
University History Project (125th Anniversary, 1987-1988)
RG-1/208
University Honors Program
see Honors Program RG-6/4/11
University Human Subjects Review Committees
RG-9/1/2/1
University Information Systems
see Umass Information Technology Services RG-35/7
University Internship Program
see Internships, Office of (University Internship Program) RG-11/6
University Lectures, Committee on
see Lectures, Committee on University RG-40/2/L1.5
University Magazine
see Massachusetts Magazine (1990-1996) RG-5/00/11
University Medal for Outstanding Service (1973)
RG-2/99
see also Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
University Monthly Anthropological Survey Service
see UMASS (Newsletter) (1982-1989) RG-25/A6/00
University Newsletter (News Bureau) (1968-1970)
RG-5/00/2
University Notebook (News Bureau) (1980-1981)
RG-5/3/2
University of El Salvador (UES)
RG-60/3
University of Lowell
RG-55/4
University of Massachusetts Foundation (1950- )
RG-50/7
see also Trustees Council RG-2/4
University of Massachusetts, Future Committee on
see Future University of Massachusetts (Official University Committee) (1970-1971) RG-40/2/F8
University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers, Center for
see Center for University of Massachusetts-Industry Research on Polymers RG-25/P7.5
University of Massachusetts Republican Club
see Republican Club, University of Massachusetts (1983- ) RG-45/80/R4
University of Massachusetts Transportation Center (UMTC)
RG-25/U4
University, Officials of the (Photographs)
see Officials of the University (Trustees and Presidents Photographs) RG-110
University Outreach
RG-16
University Outreach, Provost for
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach RG-6/6
University Outreach, Vice Chancellor For
see Vice Chancellor for University Outreach (2000- ) RG-16/1
University Photo Negatives Collection
RG-171
University Photography Club
see Photographers Association RG-45/40/P5
University Policy
see Vice President for University Policy RG-3/2
University Press (Graduate School)
RG-10/4
see also Research and Graduate Studies RG-9
University Professors, American Association of
see American Association of University Professors (AAUP) RG-40/5/A2
University Relations and Development
RG-39
University Relations and Development Council (Faculty Senate, 1995)
RG-40/2/A3
University Relations and Development–Publications
RG-39/00
University Relations and Development–Vice Chancellor for
see Vice Chancellor for University Relations and Development RG-39/1
University Relations, Vice President for
see Vice President for University Relations RG-3/14
University Report (President’s Office) (1978-1979)
RG-3/00
University, Secretary of the
see Secretary of the University RG-3/3
University Staff Association (USA)
RG-40/5/U6
see also Massachusetts State Employees Association (MSEA) (prior to 1977) MS-49
University Statistics (USTAT) (1998) (Student Special Interest Group) RG-45/40/U8
University Store
RG-37/5
University Theatre
RG-25/T3.8
University Tour Service (1984- )
RG-30/4/1
see also ARCON (University Guide Service) (1965-1984) RG-45/90/A7
University Without Walls (UWW) (School of Education)
RG-13/4/2/3
see also Associate Provost for Special Program RG-6
University Without Walls Newsletter (1972-1987)
RG-13/4/2/3
University Women
RG-40/7
University Women’s Network (UWN)
RG-40/5/U7
University Women’s Professional Network (UWPN)
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
University Writing Program
RG-7/11
University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976)
RG-6/4/4
Upbeat (1986-1989)
RG-30/11/1
UPC
see Union Program Council (UPC) RG-45/17
Update (1982-1991)
RG-25/P8/00
UPE
see Union of Professional Employees (MTA) MS-47
Upside Down Club (Religious Group) (1992- ) RG-45/70/U7
Upsilon Pi Epsilon (Honor Society)
RG-45/60/U6
Upward Bound (1966-1993)
RG-6/4
see also Upward Bound Committee (Faculty Senate, 1967) RG-40/2/A3
Future Scholars of America (1993- ) RG-6/4/13.5
Upward Bound, Committee on (Faculty Senate, 1967)
RG-40/2/A3
Urban and Community Forestry, Northeast Center for
see Northeast Center for Urban and Community Forestry (1996- ) RG-25/N7
Urban Education, Center for (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23/1
USA
see University Staff Association (USA) RG-40/5/U6
USSA
see United States Student Association (USSA) RG-45/80/U5
UVC TV-19 (Student Run Television Station) (1999- )
RG-45/30/U7
UWN
see University Women’s Network (UWN) RG-40/5/U7
UWPN
see Women in Staff Professional Positions (WISPP) RG-40/5/W5
UWW
see University Without Walls (UWW) RG-13/4/2/3
UYA
see University Year for Action (UYA) (1971-1976) RG-6/4/4

Field, William Franklin, 1922-

William F. Field Papers, 1948-1986.

27 (13.5 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 030/2 F5
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971
William F. Field relaxing on couch, ca. 1971

The University’s first Dean of Students, William F. Field held the post from 1961 until his retirement in 1988. The 27 years Field was Dean of Students was a critical time of growth and unrest, as the University’s student population more than tripled in size and the nation-wide movements for civil rights and against the Vietnam War were reflected through student activism and protest on the University’s campus. Responsible for ending student curfews and overseeing all dorms becoming co-ed, Field also worked with minority students and faculty to support the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

The William F. Field Papers document Field’s career as an administrator at the University of Massachusetts and specifically his role as Dean of Students from 1961-1988. The correspondence, memoranda, reports, notes, and other official printed and manuscript documents are a rich resource for one of the most important and volatile eras in the University’s history. Of particular interest are extensive files on student protests and activism in the late 1960s and early 1970s and the growing diversity of the campus student population, flourishing of the Black Arts Movement on campus and the founding of the W.E.B. Du Bois Afro-American Studies Department.

Subjects

  • African American college students--Massachusetts
  • Field, William Franklin, 1922-
  • Race relations--United States
  • Universities and colleges--United States--Administration
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Dean of Students
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Afro-American Studies
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975--Protest movements--United States

Types of material

  • Correspondence
  • Memorandums

Hapgood, Beth

Beth Hapgood Papers, 1789-2005.

67 boxes (35 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 434
Beth Hapgood and members of the Brotherhood, ca.1969
Beth Hapgood and members of the Brotherhood, ca.1969

Daughter of a writer and diplomat, and graduate of Wellesley College, Beth Hapgood has been a spiritual seeker for much of her life. Her interests have led her to become an expert in graphology, a student in the Arcane School, an instructor at Greenfield Community College, and a lecturer on a variety of topics in spiritual growth. Beginning in the mid-1960s, Hapgood befriended Michael Metelica, the central figure in the Brotherhood of the Spirit (the largest commune in the eastern states during the early 1970s) as well as Elwood Babbitt, a trance medium, and remained close to both until their deaths.

The Hapgood Papers contain a wealth of material relating to the Brotherhood of the Spirit and the Renaissance Community, Metelica, Babbitt, and other of Hapgood’s varied interests, as well as 4.25 linear feet of material relating to the Hapgood family.

Subjects

  • Brotherhood of the Spirit
  • Channeling (Spiritualism)
  • Communal living--Massachusetts
  • Graphology
  • Hapgood family--Correspondence
  • Massachusetts--Social life and customs--20th century
  • Mediums--Massachusetts
  • Nineteen sixties--Social aspects
  • Occultism--Social aspects
  • Popular culture--History--20th century
  • Renaissance Community
  • Rock music--1971-1980
  • Warwick (Mass.)--History

Contributors

  • Babbitt, Elwood, 1922-
  • Boyce, Neith, 1872-1951
  • Hapgood, Beth--Correspondence
  • Hapgood, Charles H
  • Hapgood, Elizabeth Reynolds
  • Hapgood, Hutchins, 1869-1944
  • Hapgood, Norman, 1868-1937
  • Metelica, Michael

Hill, Aurin F.

Aurin F. Hill Papers, 1885-1929.

8 boxes (6 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 579
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,<br />ca.1928
Aurin and Izetta Hill at Lake Pleasant,
ca.1928

The self-styled “insane architect” Aurin F. Hill (b. 1853) was a free thinking carpenter and architect in Boston who waged a concerted campaign for his vision of social reform at the turn of the twentieth century. A Spiritualist, social radical, and union man, Hill carried the torch for issues ranging from the nationalization of railroads and corporations to civil rights and women’s rights, and joined in opposition to vaccination, Comstockery and censorship, capital punishment, and lynching. A writing medium, married to the Spiritual evangelist Izetta Sears-Hill, he became President of the National Spiritual Alliance in 1915, a Spiritualist organization based in Lake Pleasant, Mass.

Esoteric, rambling, and often difficult to follow, the Hill papers provide profound insight into the eclectic mind of an important Boston Spiritualist and labor activist at the turn of the twentieth century. Whether written as a diary or scattered notes, a scrapbook, essays, or letters to the editor, Hill’s writings cover a wide range of topics, from spirit influence to labor law, from his confinements for insanity to police strikes, hypnotism, reincarnation, and housing. More than just a reflection of one man’s psychology, the collection reveals much about broader social attitudes toward gender and race, sexuality, urban life, politics, and religion, and the collection is a particularly important resource for the history of the American Spiritualist movement between 1890 and 1920.

Subjects

  • Architects--Massachusetts--Boston
  • Boston (Mass.)--History
  • Carpenters--Labor unions
  • Hypnotism
  • Labor unions--Massachusetts
  • Lake Pleasant (Mass.)--History
  • Mediums--Massachusetts
  • Montague (Mass.)--History
  • National Spiritual Alliance
  • Spiritualism
  • United Brotherhood of Carpenters and Joiners of America

Contributors

  • Hill, Aurin F.
  • Sears-Hill, Izetta B.

Types of material

  • Diaries
  • Scrapbooks

Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-

George Millman Papers, 1944-1945.

3 boxes (3 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 728
George and Lillian Millman
George and Lillian Millman

Born in Boston, Massachusetts in 1919, George Millman attended Massachusetts State College briefly, but was forced to drop out after his freshman year due to financial hardship. After attending a three-month intensive training course, Millman was employed by the War Department in 1941 as a civilian inspector in the munitions plant in New London, Connecticut. In the months that followed the attack on Pearl Harbor, he felt it was his patriotic duty to join the armed forces and enlisted on May 28, 1942. Called to active duty six months later, Millman was commissioned as a 2nd Lieutenant in the Army Air Corps on April 29, 1943. Already dating his soon-to-be-bride Lillian, the couple decided to marry immediately before he could be sent overseas. Assigned to a class on the theoretical aspects of radar at Harvard University, Millman was ordered to report to the Army Air Force Technical School in Boca Raton in late 1943. On June 24, 1944, he received secret travel orders assigning him to the 5th Air Force Service Command in Brisbane, Australia. There he began training fighter pilots on the use and operation of the newly developed airborne radar, AN/APS-4. Throughout his tour in the Pacific, which ended in early 1946, Millman traveled throughout the region, including time in Australia, the Netherlands East Indies, the Netherlands New Guinea, and the Philippines.

Containing almost 400 letters written to his wife Lillian during World War II, Millman’s papers detail nearly every aspect of life in the service during wartime. From chronicling extreme environmental conditions to his feelings of frustration while awaiting assignment, Millman’s letters offer a personal perspective of the impact of war on an individual and his loved ones. While his letters carefully avoid any details about his work that could have been censored, they capture in extraordinary detail the day-to-day life of a serviceman in the Pacific theater during WWII. Millman published his letters to his wife in 2011 in a book entitled Letters to Lillian.

Subjects

  • World War, 1939-1945

Contributors

  • Millman, George H. (George Harold), 1919-

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Putnam, William

William Putnam Papers, 1840-1886.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 014

For several decades in the mid-nineteenth century, William Putnam (1792-1877) and his family operated a general store in Wendell Depot, Massachusetts, situated strategically between the canal and the highway leading to Warwick. Serving an area that remains rural to the present day, Putnam dealt in a range of essential merchandise, trading in lumber and shingles, palm leaf, molasses and sugar, tea, tobacco, quills, dishes, cloth and ribbon, dried fish, crackers, and candy. At various times, he was authorized by the town Selectmen to sell “intoxicating liquors” (brandy, whiskey, and rum) for “Medicinal, chemical and mechanical purposes only,” and for a period, he served as postmaster for Wendell Depot.

The daybooks and correspondence of William Putnam record the daily transactions of an antebellum storekeeper in rural Wendell, Massachusetts. Offering a dense record of transactions from 1840-1847, the daybooks provide a chronological accounting of all sales and credits in the store, including barter with local residents of the community and with contractors for the new Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad. The last in the series of daybooks lists a surprisingly high percentage of Wendell’s residents (by name, in alphabetical order) who owed him money as of October 1846. The correspondence associated with the collection continues into the 1880s and provides relatively slender documentation of Putnam’s litigiousness, his financial difficulties after the Civil War, and the efforts of his son John William to continue the business.

Subjects

  • Barter--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Consumer goods--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Consumers--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • General stores--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Liquor stores--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Panama hat industry--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Schools--Massachusetts--Wendell
  • Vermont and Massachusetts Railroad
  • Wendell (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Wendell (Mass.)--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Putnam, William

Types of material

  • Daybooks

Smith and Wesson Company

Smith & Wesson Records, 1920-1973.

30 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 267

World famous handgun and handcuff-manufacturing company founded in Springfield, Massachusetts in the 1850s.

The Smith and Wesson records are comprised of incoming sales and service correspondence with some outgoing correspondence and administrative and financial/legal subject files, including categories such as ads and advertising, American Railway Express, audits, counselors at law, debtors, insurance, legal actions, newsletters, patents and trademarks, personnel, photos, sample parts, sideline ventures, stocks and bonds awards, and Western Union Telegrams. Includes correspondence with the National Rifle Association, Small Arms Industry Advisory Committee, and the United States Revolver Association.

Subjects

  • Pistols--Design and construction

Contributors

  • National Rifle Association
  • Small Arms Industry Advisory Committee
  • Smith and Wesson
  • United States Revolver Association

Social Change Colloquium

Student holding academic gown adorned with Black Power symbol, 1970
Barn

Each fall, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives sponsors a colloquium focusing on a topic in social change. Like SCUA’s collections, these colloquia cover a broad terrain, touching on a variety of issues in social justice, equality, and democracy.

Colloquia are free and open to the public.

Colloquium 2014, Tenth Anniversary (Monday, November 3rd)
A Long and Winding Road: The legacy of the back-to-the-land communes of the 1960s

November 3, 2014, from 4:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m., Lower Level, W.E.B. Du Bois Library
“A Long and Winding Road: The legacy of the back-to-the-land communes of the 1960s,” will explore the nearly forty year history of some of the region’s best known communes: Montague Farm and Wendell Farms nearby in Massachusetts, and Packer Corners and Tree Frog Farms in neighboring southern Vermont. All were partners in the back-to-the-land movement of the late 1960s and early 1970s; all have survived into the current era. The colloquium’s four speakers, who have each spent much of the intervening years on or near one of the four farms, represent each of these idealistic enterprises, as well as offering their own specific views. What have they learned from their long years in service to their ideals? Was the altruism of the counterculture era borne out in the experiences they faced later? Would they recommend the route of alternative life to the youth and radicals of today?

The sources of inspiration that led to the creation of these communities and the evidence of their later influence are documented by SCUA. The Famous Long Ago archive was formed to collect, preserve, and make available materials relating to the communes at Montague Farm, Packer Corners, Johnson Pasture, Wendell Farm, and Tree Frog Farm. Collections range from from the papers of writers Steve Diamond, Raymond Mungo, and Jonathan Maslow to those of anti-war activists Randy Kehler and Betsy Corner; from the records of the Liberation News Service, the organization that spawned the farms, to the Alternative Energy Coalition, and Musicians United for Safe Energy, later enterprises of the region’s communal farmer-activists. It also includes the photographic collections of farm parent Roy Finestone, photojournalist Lionel Delevingne, and former head of a neighboring Montague ashram, Stephen Josephs.

Panel:
Daniel Keller, filmmaker, farmer: Wendell Farm, Green Mountain Post Films
Verandah Porche, writer, teacher: Packer Corners Farm, Monteverdi Artists Collaborative
John Scagliotti, filmmaker, LGBT activist: Tree Frog Farm, Kopkind Colony
Susan Mareneck, artist, teacher, social worker: Early resident and longtime neighbor of Montague Farm, Montague Catholic Social Ministries

Moderator:
Timothy Miller, University of Kansas, scholar of intentional communities, author of The Hippies and American Values (1991), The Quest for Utopia in Twentieth-Century America (1998), The Sixties Communes: Hippies and Beyond (1999)

Participant bios

Verandah Porche
Verandah Porche

Verandah Porche, a forty-year resident of Packer Corners Farm (known to the reading public, through the works of Ray Mungo and others, as Total Loss Farm) works as a poet-in-residence, performer, and writing partner. Based in rural Vermont since 1968, she has published three volumes of poetry – Sudden Eden (Verdant Books), The Body’s Symmetry (Harper and Row) and Glancing Off (See Through Books) – and has pursued an alternative literary career, creating collaborative writing projects in nontraditional settings: literacy and crisis centers, hospitals, factories, nursing homes, senior centers, a 200 year-old Vermont tavern, and an urban working class neighborhood. Broad Brook Anthology, a play for voices, honors the lives of elders in her home town of Guilford, Vermont. Listening Out Loud documents her residency with Real Art Ways in Hartford, Connecticut. Come Over is a CD of songs written with her neighbor Patty Carpenter, performed by the Dysfunctional Family Jazz band. She has read her work on NPR stations, in the Vermont State House, and at the Guggenheim Museum. In 1998 the Vermont Arts Council presented her with its Award of Merit, and Marlboro College, in 2012, an honorary Doctor of Humane Letters.

Susan Mareneck
Susan Mareneck

Susan Mareneck arrived in the Pioneer Valley in the mid 1960s, and spent her college years engaged in civil rights and anti-war activities, majoring Art and Political Science. After experiencing Montague Farm for several months in its early days, she settled into an unrenovated 18th century farmhouse in nearby Leverett, a building without heat or running water. Improving it slowly but concertedly over the years, she returned regularly to the house for vacations and summers, and has remained a neighbor of Montague Farm and a member of its extended family ever since. Decamping after several years for a graduate degree in art, and finally a move to New York, she spent 30 years making art and teaching it at the Spence School and the Convent of the Sacred Heart, on New York’s upper east side, before returning to western Massachusetts in 2009 to work full time with families in Turners Falls as Executive Director at Montague Catholic Social Ministries. Living three blocks from Ground Zero, Susan saw her world change forever on 9/11. Her turn from education to social work reflects her long interest in non-profits and the role of faith in social change. Her work in that area has included projects directed toward employment, racism, educational policy, and prisons. She has exhibited, lectured, and published in the visual arts and historic preservation, and remains active in organizing the local history of her town, North Leverett, Mass.

John Scagliotti
John Scagliotti

John Scagliotti is an Emmy Award-winning American film director, producer, and radio broadcaster. He has received honors for his work on documentaries about LGBT issues including Before Stonewall and After Stonewall. During the 1970s, Scagliotti was the News and Public Affairs Director of the pioneering radio station WBCN-FM in Boston. For his work in radio, he was awarded two Major Armstrong Awards. In the early 1980s, he attended New York University Film School and went on to create In the Life for PBS, the first gay and lesbian national television series in the United States. The Scagliotti-produced documentary film Before Stonewall (1985) won the Audience Award at L.A. Outfest and two Emmies. Scagliotti directed a companion piece, After Stonewall, which won a Golden Eagle and the Audience Award at the Los Angeles Gay and Lesbian Film Festival. Scagliotti is openly gay. His partner for 24 years was the late, highly regarded journalist Andrew Kopkind. Together they produced the radio show The Lavender Hour. Scagliotti is a longtime resident of the Kopkind Colony, an activist community housed at Tree Frog Farm, a close neighbor to Packer Corners Farm in Guilford, Vermont. The Kopkind Colony holds an educational summer residency program for nonpartisan, independent journalists and community organizers. In addition, the Colony fosters public education through publication of its lectures and the hosting of open forums on contemporary issues held at Tree Frog Farm and in other educational centers around the country.

Daniel Keller
Daniel Keller

Daniel Keller, a founder of Wendell Farm, in Wendell Massachusetts, has lived there, keeping it a working organic farm, since its inception in 1969. In collaboration with Charles Light, a former communard of the Johnson Pasture and Montague Farm, Keller’s Green Mountain Post Films, with offices in nearby Turners Falls, has produced and distributed award-winning films for more than twenty-five years. GMP’s first documentary Lovejoy’s Nuclear War, released in 1975, about Montague Farm activist Sam Lovejoy, was one of the first films to question the nuclear energy policy of the United States. Since then GMP Films has continued to produce movies that explore social issues, Its films have been used as educational and organizational tools for activists working on peace, veteran, nuclear, environmental, and other related issues. GMP films include: The Last Resort (1978), and Save the Planet (1979), both on nuclear issues; The Secret Agent (1983), on Agent Orange; and Unknown Secrets (1990), on the reaction of artists and writers to the arrest, trial, and execution of accused spies Julius and Ethel Rosenberg. For Vietnam Experience Keller and Light teamed up with musician Country Joe McDonald to bring viewers closer to the reality of the Vietnam War. Cannabis Rising is an early investigation into the issues surrounding marijuana today so much in the news.

Timothy Miller
Timothy Miller

Timothy Miller is a longtime student of communal living, professor of religious studies at the University of Kansas, and author of The Hippies and American Values (1991), The Quest for Utopia in Twentieth-Century America (1998), The Sixties Communes: Hippies and Beyond (1999). His course offerings include a history of intentional communities in America; American religious history; and an overview of new and alternative religious movements in the United States. Miller’s major research focus is the history of intentional communities in America, especially in the twentieth century. For his work in this area, Professor Miller has been recognized by the Communal Studies Association as a distinguished scholar. Additional areas of research interest include American religious history, new and alternative religious movements in the United States, and religion in Kansas. Professor Miller also coordinates the Religion in Kansas Oral History Project. His most recent publications include The Encyclopedic Guide to American Intentional Communities (Richard Couper Press), Spiritual and Visionary Communities: Out to Save the World (Ashgate Publishing), as well as the second edition of The Hippies and American Values (University of Tennessee Press), and the second edition of Following In His Steps: A Biography of Charles M. Sheldon (University of Tennessee Press). Through Miller’s work on American communes, he has long been familiar with the extended farm family at the center of the current symposium. In a recent book review, taking in the larger field in which he is involved, he wrote, “…it can be safely said that Montague Farm has the best published record of any of the communes.”

Wallace, Karl Richards, 1905-1973

Karl Richards Wallace Papers, 1898-1976.

(14.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 086

Educator, rhetorician, author, President of the Speech Association of America in 1954, and Professor of Speech at the University of Massachusetts Amherst from 1968-1973.

Includes the accumulated research notes and materials written and used by Wallace in his career as a teacher and author; drafts, reprints, and proofs of his speeches, papers, articles, and books, both published and unpublished, often with accompanying correspondence, research notes, and/or contracts; lecture notes and classroom materials dating from his years as a student through those as a teacher; drafts and reprints of papers and articles by students and colleagues; correspondence; the reports, memoranda, correspondence, resolutions, agenda, notes on meetings, minutes, committee recommendations, position papers, newsletters, audit reports, budget recommendations, membership lists, itineraries, and programs indicative of his leadership and active participation in the Speech Association of America and other professional organizations, conferences, and university committees.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English

Contributors

  • Wallace, Karl Richards, 1905-1973
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