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Hawks, Alice Totman

Alice Totman Hawks Collection
1934-1978
4 boxes (5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 731
Image of

Born on January 29, 1908 in Conway, Massachusetts, Alice Totman spent her early years on her father’s family farm, Page Place, before he was forced to sell it due to a labor scarcity in 1916 and moved the family to Greenfield. She graduated from Greenfield High School in 1927 and enrolled at Massachusetts School of Art in Boston. She studied there for a year and a half before marrying Hart Mowry Hawks on June 16, 1929. The couple settled in Bellows Fall, Vermont where Mowry was recently assigned a permanent post with the Boston and Maine Railroad. Tragically, over the next fifteen years, Alice experienced seven pregnancies, only one of which resulted in a healthy child, Gertrude Ann, born in 1932. Alice’s interest in her family can be traced back to the earliest days of her marriage, during which time she worked on genealogies for both the Totman and Hawks families. Eager to share the knowledge she acquired and assembled, she often found ways to update her relatives, most notably in a family newsletter called Tot-Kin that she edited and published between the years 1935-1945.

Alice Totman Hawks’s collection consists of her extensive genealogical notes and writings, including a run of Tot-Kin, correspondence and some of Alice’s sketches.

Subjects
  • Hawks family
  • Massachusetts--Genealogy
  • Totman family
Contributors
  • Hawks, Alice Totman
Types of material
  • Genealogies
  • Letters (Correspondence)

Heinrichs, Waldo H.

Waldo H. Heinrichs Papers
ca.1895-2015
5 boxes (7.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 633
Image of Waldo Huntley Heinrichs and Dorothy Peterson, 1919
Waldo Huntley Heinrichs and Dorothy Peterson, 1919

A diplomatic and military historian, Waldo H. Heinrichs was the product of a family with a unique global perspective. A descendant of missionaries to Hawaii and South India and son of a man who led the YMCA mission in Palestine, Heinrichs grew up traveling internationally. After military service during the Second World War, he received both a bachelor’s degree (1949) and doctorate (1960) in history from Harvard, sandwiching in post-baccalaureate study at Brasenose College, Oxford, and stint in the foreign service and advertising. A long-time member of the faculty at Temple University, he has written extensively on U.S. foreign relations in the twentieth century. His first book, Joseph Grew, American Ambassador (1966), was awarded the Allan Nevins Prize and in later works he explored both the diplomatic and military history of the Pacific.

A tireless researcher, Heinrichs left a rich record of correspondence, writing, and notes relating to his work as an historian, and especially to his work on the diplomatic and military background of the Pacific during the Second World War. His collection, however, is still broader, including content relating to his own military service during and after the war and fascinating materials relating to his family. Of particular note are records of his father, Waldo Huntley Heinrichs, including copies of a diary kept as a fighter pilot in the 95th Aero Squadron during the First World War and a memoir of his experiences being shot down and taken as a prisoner of war, along with later materials documenting his YMCA service, and his on faculty at Middlebury College and as an intelligence officer with the 8th Fighter Command during the Second World War.

Gift of Waldo Heinrichs, Mar. 2016
Subjects
  • Historians
  • Temple University--Faculty
  • United States. Army. Air Service. Aero Squadron, 95th
  • World War, 1914-1918
  • World War, 1939-1945--Diplomatic history
  • World War, 1939-1945--Pacific area
Contributors
  • Heinrichs, Jacob
  • Heinrichs, Waldo Huntley
Types of material
  • Photographs

Hemenway, Phinehas

Phinehas Hemenway Daybook
1818-1828
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 627

The tanner Phinehas Hemenway was born in Bolton, Worcester County, Mass., in September 1794, the fourth of six children born to Simeon and Mary (Goss) Hemenway, but he resided nearly his entire adult life in the Franklin County hill town of Shutesbury. Although little is known about his life, Hemenway appears to have married twice, to a Polly or Mary Gray in about 1816, and to the widow Mary Sears of Prescott in Aril 1838. Hemenway died in Shutesbury on December 21, 1850.

With approximately 150 pages of brief, but closely written records of daily transactions, the Hemenway daybook documents the range of activities of rural tannery in antebellum Massachusetts. Along with the names of clients, the date and amount, and a brief notation on whether the work was for dressing, tanning, currying, or (apparently) the sale of finished product, Hemenway records work in a variety of leathers, from calf to sheep, hog, and horse and from sole leather to upper leather, sometimes specified as for shoes. The daybook also includes credit entries for labor performed, the purchase of hemlock bark or hides, or more rarely for cash to settle accounts.

Subjects
  • Shutesbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Tanners--Massachusetts--Shutesbury
Contributors
  • Hemenway, Phinehas, 1796-1850
Types of material
  • Daybooks

Henry, Samuel

Samuel Henry Accounts Books
1813-1881
2 boxes (0.75 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 013

Justice of the peace, merchant, landowner, and entrepreneur from Prescott and Shutesbury, Massachusetts. Nine volumes contain descriptions of his duties as justice of the peace, a book of deeds and mortgages from local real estate transactions, account books of sales in his general store and from his palm leaf hat business, and notes of accounts with individuals.

Subjects
  • General stores--Massachusetts--Shutesbury
  • Panama hat industry--Massachusetts
  • Prescott (Mass.)--History
  • Shutesbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Shutesbury (Mass.)--History
Contributors
  • Henry, Samuel, 19th cent
Types of material
  • Account books

Hicks, Adeline

Adeline Hicks Papers
1917-1987
3 boxes (1.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 070

Professor of Physical Education at the University of Massachusetts Amherst when it was known as Massachusetts Agricultural College who established the physical education program for women and helped to create the women’s gymnasium and athletic field. In her retirement she composed music that was performed by the University of Arizona orchestra.

Includes musical scores, lesson-plan photographs illustrating instruction in modern dance, correspondence, printed programs for performance of the musical compositions, text of an address, a history of physical education for women at Massachusetts State College by Mrs. Hicks, personnel records, and brief biographical items.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
Contributors
  • Hicks, Adeline

Hicks, Curry S.

Curry S. Hicks Papers
1914-1949
1 box (0.25 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 069
Image of Curry S. Hicks
Curry S. Hicks

Curry S. Hicks pioneered the University’s athletics program as it transitioned from the Massachusetts Agricultural College to the University of Massachusetts. Hicks led the charge to build modern athletic fields and gymnasia and during his tenure, many of the University’s teams climbed to new heights of excellence. Born in 1885 in Enfield, New York, Hicks began undergraduate studies at Michigan State University but was forced to drop out because he was unable to pay tuition, beginning a teaching career that brought him from math teacher to high school principal. Returning to Michigan Normal School, Hicks earned his B.A. in physical education in 1909, followed by the Hitchcock Fellowship at Amherst College and eventually his assistant professorship in Physical Education and Hygiene at the University in 1911. On his retirement in 1949, Hicks left behind a thoroughly modernized athletics program and moved to Tucson, Arizona, where he passed away in 1963.

The Curry S. Hicks Papers consist of a bound volume of letters, sent to Hicks as a commemoration of his retirement in 1949 and a folder of correspondence related to his organization and fundraising efforts for a new physical education building at the University.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Physical Education
Contributors
  • Hicks, Curry S

Higgins, Lyman

Lyman Higgins Account Book
1851-1886
1 vol. (0.15 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 118

A resident of South Worthington, Massachusetts, Lyman Higgins appears in the Federal Census and in town histories as also pursuing a variety of other callings: mechanic, farmer, blacksmith, sawmill proprietor, and manufacturer. Higgins eventually devoted his work life to basket making, supplying textile mills and paper companies as far away as New York City with large batches of assorted baskets tailored to their needs.

Higgins’ account book includes records of jobs performed, payment (in goods and services as well as in cash), employees and their wages, and the local companies to which he sold his custom-made basket products.

Subjects
  • Basket industry--Massachusetts--South Worthington--History--19th century
  • Basket making--Massachusetts--South Worthington--History--19th century
  • Harris Woollen Mill
  • Lawrence Duck Co.
  • Paper industry--Equipment and supplies--History--19th century
  • Sawmills--Massachusetts--History--19th century
  • South Worthington (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Stark Mills
  • Sugar River Paper Co.
  • Textile industry--Equipment and supplies--History--19th century
  • Wages--Basket industry--Massachusetts--History--19th century
  • Wages-in-kind--Massachusetts--South Worthington--History--19th century
Contributors
  • Higgins, Lyman
Types of material
  • Account books

Hoag, Benjamin

Benjamin Hoag Records
1901-1915 (Bulk: 1907-1914)
3 boxes (4.5 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 710

Born at Ancram, N.Y., the merchant Benjamin Hoag (1865-1932) lived most of his life in Stephentown, N.Y., near the Massachusetts border. In 1900, he was listed as a dealer in bicycles, but by 1910, he was operating a broader retail trade in dry goods and grains. At the same time, he conducted a thriving trade in ornithological and oological supplies, announcing in journals such as The Oologist that he sold “books, periodicals, tools, supplies, eggs” as well as “fine line fish tackle and rods.” He also appears to have run a magazine subscription agency, offering everything from the Saturday Evening Post and Good Housekeeping to professional journals such as the Condor Magazine.

The Hoag collection consists of 1,345 letters, mostly incoming, and over 800 pieces receipts, ephemeral items, and other documents, relating to both Hoag’s oological and magazine businesses. Concentrated between 1901 and 1914, the collection offers a rich documentation of the oological trade in the years shortly before it was outlawed in 1918.

Subjects
  • Birds--Eggs
  • Egg trade--New York (State)
Contributors
  • Hoag, Benjamin

Horrigan, Leonta G.

Leonta G. Horrigan Papers
ca.1936-1986
37 boxes (55.5 linear feet)
Call no.: FS 114

A member of the Massachusetts State College Class of 1936, Leonta Gertrude Horrigan was affiliated with UMass Amherst throughout her long career in academia. After receiving he MA from Smith College in 1942 for a thesis on DeQuincy and Milton, Horrigan taught creative writing, composition, among writing classes, to UMass undergraduates, and was frequently singled out as a favorite instructor on campus. In 1964, she was appointed Assistant Dean in the College of Arts and Sciences, and retired to emeritus status in 1986.

The Horrigan Papers contain nearly a half century record of instruction in writing education at UMass, with a wide array of other materials relating to Horrigan’s varied interest, events on campus, and to the evolution of the university in the post-war years.

Subjects
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of English
Contributors
  • Horrigan, Leonta G

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum

Incipiunt interpretationes nominum hebraycorum
early 13th century
1 vol. (0.1 linear feet)
Call no.: MS 955
Image of First page of Interpretationes
First page of Interpretationes

Preparing to translate the Bible from Hebrew into Latin, St. Jerome relocated to Palestine, where in 388, he began, as he wrote, to “set forth a book of Hebrew Names, classing them under their initial letters, and placing the etymology of each at the side.” His Interpretationes nominum Hebraeorum (Interpretations of Hebrew Names) enjoyed wide popularity throughout the Middle Ages and was a regular part of early medieval Gospel books as an exegetical aid.

This incomplete copy of the Interpretation of Hebrew Names begins with “A[h]az apprehendens” and continues through “Tirus angustia v[e]l tribulatio s[i]v[e] plasmatio aut fortitudo.” Internal evidence suggests that it was once part of a larger manuscript, presumably a Bible.

Language(s): Latin
Subjects
  • Bible--Dictionaries
  • Bible--Manuscripts, Latin
  • Jerome, Saint, -419or 420. Liber interpretatonis Hebraicorum nominum
  • Names in the Bible
Types of material
  • Illuminated manuscripts
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