Results for: “Women--Massachusetts--Pioneer Valley--Political activity --History” (413 collections)SCUA

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Lewis, Patricia Lee, 1937-

Patricia Lee Lewis Photograph Collection, 1977-1979.

3 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 059
Cotton Mill no. 2, Beijing, 1977
Cotton Mill no. 2, Beijing, 1977

A co-founder of the Valley Women’s Center and the Everywoman’s Center at UMass Amherst, Patricia Lee Lewis has been an important part of the vibrant activist culture in the Pioneer Valley since her graduation from Smith College in 1970, advocating for women, civil rights, peace, the environment, for small farms and rural communities, and for art. Her varied career has included service as Supervisor of Community Development for the Massachusetts Office for Children (1974-1976), as Rural Development Specialist for the Massachusetts Cooperative Extension Service, and as County Commissioner for Hampshire County (1984-1988). After receiving an MFA from Vermont College, she founded Patchwork Farm Writing Retreat in Westhampton in 1992, which offers workshops and retreats in creative writing and yoga.

As a member of a National Women’s Delegation, Lewis visited the People’s Republic of China in 1977. Having been invited by the All China Women’s Federation, Lewis and her colleagues toured the country, seeing the sights and examining the role of women, education, and agriculture, visiting Beijing, Shanghai, Nanjing, Tachai, and Guilin. The many hundreds of photographs she took during the tour are a powerful visual record of the country only a few months after the Gage of Four were arrested and the Cultural Revolution declared ended. The collection also includes approximately 100 photographs taken of agriculture and rural life in Louisiana and Texas in 1979.

Subjects

  • China--Photographs
  • Louisiana--Photographs
  • Texas--Photographs

Types of material

  • Photographs

Ferguson, Ann

Ann Ferguson Papers, 1970-2007.

23 boxes (33 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 101

Ann Ferguson began her tenure at UMass as an Instructor in 1964 as she completed the last year of her doctoral work at Brown under supervision of R.M. Chisolm. With academic interests in ethics, aesthetics, women’s studies, and social and political philosophy, Ferguson has been politically engaged in human rights and social justice initiatives since the 1960s, supporting organizations such as Feminist Aid to Central America, Marxist Activist Philosophers, and the Radical Philosopher’s Association. In 1995, Ferguson accepted a three-year term as Director of Women’s Studies, describing the program as one with the “roots in political activism to fight social injustice.” Despite her 2008 retirement, Ferguson continues to teach in both Philosophy and Women’s Studies.

The Ferguson Papers document Ann Ferguson’s academic career at the University of Massachusetts Amherst as well as her commitment to political activism and social change. The papers include material relating to campus politics, the women’s movement and other social movements, Philosophy Department files (1971-1997) from Ferguson’s tenure as Head of the Philosophy Department, and course materials from both Women’s Studies and Philosophy. Also included among the papers are professional correspondence, feminist pamphlets (1970s-1980s), and several posters from Ferguson’s office.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Philosopy
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Program in Women's Studies

Contributors

  • Ferguson, Ann

Henderson, Elizabeth, 1943-

Elizabeth Henderson Papers, 1966-2011.

10 boxes (15 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 746

A farmer, activist, and writer, Elizabeth Henderson has exerted an enormous influence on the movement for organic and sustainable agriculture since the 1970s. Although Henderson embarked on an academic career after completing a doctorate at Yale on the Russian poet Vladimir Mayakovsky in 1974, by 1980, she abandoned academia for Unadilla Farm in Gill, Mass., where she learned organic techniques for raising vegetables. Relocating to Rose Valley Farm in Wayne County, NY, in 1989, she helped establish Genesee Valley Organic CSA (GVOCSA), one of the first in the country, and she continued the relationship with the CSA after founding Peacework Organic Farm in Newark, NY, in 1998. Deeply involved in the organic movement at all levels, Henderson was a founding member of the Northeast Organic Farming Association (NOFA) in Massachusetts, has served on the Board of Directors for NOFA NY, the NOFA Interstate Council, SARE (Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education) Northeast, and many other farming organizations at the state, regional, and national level, and she has been an important voice in national discussions on organic standards, fair trade, and agricultural justice. Among other publications, Henderson contributed to and edited The Real Dirt: Farmers Tell about Organic and Low-Input Practices in the Northeast and co-wrote Sharing the Harvest: A Citizen’s Guide to Community Supported Agriculture (1999, with Robyn Van En) and A Manual of Whole Farm Planning (2003, with Karl North).

Offering insight into the growth of the organic agriculture movement and the organizations that have sustained it, the Henderson Papers document Henderson’s involvement with NOFA, SARE, and the GVOCSA, along with her work to establish organic standards and promote organic practices. Henderson’s broad social and political commitments are represented by a rich set of letters from her work educating prisoners in the late 1970s, including correspondence with Tiyo Atallah Salah El and John Clinkscales, and with the American Independent Movement in New Haven during the early 1970s, including a nearly complete run of the AIM Bulletin and its successor Modern Times.

Subjects

  • American Independent Movement (Conn.)
  • Community Supported Agriculture
  • Genesee Valley Organic
  • Northeast Organic Farming Association
  • Organic farming
  • Peacework Organic Farm (Newark, N.Y.)
  • Sustainable Agriculture Research and Education Program

Contributors

  • Clinkscale, John
  • Salah El, Tiyo Atallah

Types of material

  • Newspapers

Ross, Laura

Laura M. Ross Papers, 1945-2003 (Bulk: 1967-1990).

13 boxes (6.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 515
Laura Ross
Laura Ross

Born in the coal mining town of Blossburg, Pa., in 1913, Laura Ross (nee Kaplowitz) grew up in poverty as one of seven children of Lithuanian immigrants. In about 1932, Ross married Harry Naddell, a wine merchant, and settled into a comfortable life Brooklyn, N.Y., raising a son and daughter. During the Second World War, however, she became intensely politicized through her work with Russian War Relief, joining the Communist Party and eventually divorcing her les radical husband. Moving to the Boston area, she married Max Ross in 1963, an attorney for the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, and became a noted presence in a wide range of political activities, working for civil rights, the antiwar movement, and for many years, helping to run the Center for Marxist Education in Central Square , Cambridge. Perhaps most notably, between 1974 and 1984, Ross ran for Congress three times on the Communist Party ticket, taking on the powerful incumbent Tip O’Neill and winning almost a quarter of the vote. An activist to the end, Ross died in Cambridge on August 5, 2007.

The Ross Papers contain a variety of materials documenting the activism of a Boston-based member of the Communist Party USA. Strongly concentrated in the period 1967-1990, the collection includes membership information, party platforms, minutes from various district committee meetings, course information and syllabi, information on local politicians, flyers, calls to action, petitions, legal proceedings during plant strikes, and some correspondence and course materials relating to the Center for Marxist Education. There is a sizable amount of information on President Ronald Reagan, including calls for the abolition of “Reaganomics” and an absolute end to the Nuclear Arms Race, and a large amount of material regarding the Communist Party of the USA and the People’s Daily World newspaper.

Subjects

  • Center for Marxist Education (Cambridge, Mass.)
  • Communist Party of the United States of America
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts
  • People’s Daily World
  • United States--Politics and government--1981-1989

Contributors

  • Ross, Laura

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Academic Affairs

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Academic Affairs, 1864-2007.

(160.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 006

Responsibility for academic affairs at Massachusetts Agricultural College initially fell to the college President, however in 1906, the Board of Trustees created the office of Dean of the College to oversee issues relating to student attendance, scholarship standing, the enforcement of faculty rules, and general student discipline. In 1953, the office of Provost was created to provide leadership in all areas of academic activity, and in 1970, the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost became the chief academic officer of the campus, responsible for advising the Chancellor on the whole of the University’s academic program.

The bulk of the record group consists of the files of individual Deans of the College, Provosts, and Vice Chancellors for Academic Affairs, as well as the University Year for Action (1971-1976). Also included are the records of the interim and special appointees that report to the Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs and Provost, and the special programs, committees, institutes, and centers that were initiated by or developed from those offices.

Subjects

  • College students--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of Academic Affairs
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of Information Technology
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Office of International Programs

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Associations with Other Institutions

University of Massachusetts Amherst. Associations with Other Institutions


Call no.: RG 060

Materials relating to UMass participation in regional and national consortia and other initiatives, including its associations with fellow land grant institutions, the New England Board of Higher Education, the University of El Salvador (its sister university), and cooperation through the Four and Five College Consortia. The record group also includes records of the Massachusetts Review (but see MS 555) and WFCR radio.

Subjects

  • Five Colleges Inc
  • Massachusetts Review
  • New England Board of Higher Education
  • WFCR (Radio station : Amherst, Mass.)

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst

University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education

University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education, 1868-2000.

(18 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 018

Physical education was required of all students during the early years of Massachusetts Agricultural College (MAC), enforced through required courses in the Department of Military Science and Tactics. Although intermural competition began shortly thereafter with a loss by the Wilder Baseball Association (Mass Aggies) to Amherst College 57-38, athletics were slow to catch on, due largely to a lack of student interest and faculty opposition. By 1909, a formal department of Physical Education and Hygiene was established to provide fitness training and coordinate the sports teams, with a separate women’s program following in 1940, however unlike most other universities, athletics were de-emphasized at UMass for many years, remaining more or less stagnant until the post-1960 expansion of the University.

This record group consists of annual reports, Athletic Board records, committee meeting minutes, policies, financial statements (1911-1921), histories, handbooks, Varsity “M” Club records, Hall of Fame records, athletic field records, correspondence and memoranda, curriculum and teacher training courses, colloquia and conference materials, schedules and scores (1871-1923), newsletters and newsclippings, media programs and guides, brochures and catalogs, pamphlets and fliers, and related materials.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Sports

Contributors

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Athletic Board
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. School of Physical Education

Massachusetts Constitution

Massachusetts Constitution Revision Collection, 1948-1965.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 449

In the early 1960s the Council for Constitutional Reform, a nonpartisan citizen organization seeking to promote economical and efficient state government, called for a constitutional convention to convene in Massachusetts. The group cited the state’s national reputation for corruption and public immorality as reasons for amending the constitution, while others argued that the state’s problems, primarily governmental waste, a cumbersome state tax structure, and inefficient state agencies, could only be resolved by the legislature and governor. Opponents to the convention argued too that the cost of such a convention, in total more than $2 million, would only increase the financial burden of the state.

Correspondence and position statements arguing both sides of the debate offer insight into the politics of the 1960s as well as the public’s response to the political climate in the Commonwealth. Newspaper clippings trace the movement for constitutional reform from early proposals to the approval of four amendments during the November 1964 election.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--Economic conditions--20th century
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Massachusetts. Constitution

Massachusetts Public Information Research Group (MassPIRG)

Massachusetts Public Information Research Group Records, 1972-1989.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 054

A non-profit, nonpartisan organization, MassPIRG is an advocate for the public interest in Massachusetts. Taking a stand on issues like public health, political corruption, consumer protection, and voting rights, MassPIRG uses the combined power of research, the media, grassroots organizing, and advocacy to initiate change that will improve the lives of citizens of the state.

Records of MassPIRG include reports on topics of research and investigation, issues of their publication, MassPIRG Reports, and documents relating to the establishment of Western Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (WMPIRG) on the UMass Amherst campus in 1972.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-

Contributors

  • Massachusetts Public Information Research Group

Massachusetts. Department of Agriculture

Farmers’ Produce Market Report Collection, 1935-1939.

4 vols. (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 588 bd

Established by the Department of Agriculture, the Division of Markets was responsible for determining the demand of agricultural products, encouraging their growth in Massachusetts, and informing purchasers and distributors of the condition of the markets. The division’s daily—except Saturday and Sunday—report provided vital information about the supply and demand of produce in the state.

The Farmers’ Produce Market Report Collection consists of the division’s report for the years 1935-1939. Details recorded include the activity of the market, prices for specific produce, agricultural products shipped within the U.S., and weather forecasts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural economics--Massachusetts
  • Agriculture--History
  • Agriculture--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Massachusetts. Department of Agriculture
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