Results for: “Navajo Gospel Mission” (72 collections)SCUA

Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Kenyon Leech Butterfield Papers, 1889-1945.

(12 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 B88
Kenyon L. Butterfield
Kenyon L. Butterfield

An agricultural and educational reformer born in 1868, Kenyon Butterfield was the ninth president of Massachusetts Agricultural College and one of the university’s most important figures. An 1891 graduate of Michigan Agricultural College and recipient of MA in Economics and Rural Sociology from the University of Michigan (1902), Butterfield entered university administration early in his career, becoming President of the Rhode Island College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts in 1903 and, only three years later, of the Massachusetts Agricultural College. Possessed of a Progressive spirit, Butterfield revolutionized the college during his 18 years in Amherst, expanding and diversifying the curriculum, quadrupling the institutional budget, fostering a dramatic increase in the presence of women on campus and expanding the curriculum, and above all, helping to promote the Smith-Lever Act of 1914 and developing the Cooperative Extension Service into a vital asset to the Commonwealth. Nationally, he maintained a leadership role in the field of rural sociology and among Land Grant University presidents. After leaving Amherst in 1924, Butterfield served as President at Michigan Agricultural College for four years and was active in missionary endeavors in Asia before retiring. He died at his home in Amherst on Nov. 25, 1936.

The Butterfield Papers contain biographical materials, administrative and official papers of both of his presidencies, typescripts of his talks, and copies of his published writings. Includes correspondence and memoranda (with students, officials, legislators, officers of organizations, and private individuals), reports, outlines, minutes, surveys, and internal memoranda.

Subjects

  • Agricultural education--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural education--Michigan--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Agricultural extension work--United States--History--Sources
  • Agriculture--United States--History--Sources
  • Education--United States--History--Sources
  • Food supply--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Higher education and state--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Alumni and alumnae
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--Students
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President
  • Massachusetts State College--Faculty
  • Michigan Agricultural College--History
  • Michigan Agricultural College. President
  • Rural churches--United States--History--Sources
  • Rural development--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • Women--Education (Higher)--Massachusetts--History--Sources
  • World War, 1914-1918

Contributors

  • Butterfield, Kenyon L. (Kenyon Leech), 1868-1935

Center for Community Access Television (Amherst, Mass.)

Center for Community Access Television Records, 1973-1989.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 293

Group comprised of students from the University of Massachusetts and community members who sought to develop and promote cultural, literary, charitable, educational and public affairs television programming. Records include by-laws, articles of organization, organizational histories, annual reports, meeting minutes, correspondence, program schedules, subject files, brochures, handbills, news clippings, and materials relating to a proposed merger with University of Massachusetts Cable Vision. In 1989, CCATV was renamed Amherst Community Television (ACT).

Subjects

  • Amherst (Mass.)--Intellectual life--20th century
  • Cable television--Massachusetts--Amherst--History
  • Public-access television--Massachusetts--Amherst--History
  • Television programs--Massachusetts--Amherst--History

Contributors

  • Center for Community Access Television (Amherst, Mass.)

Types of material

  • Handbills

Chenoweth, Walter W. (Walter Winfred), b. 1872

Walter W. Chenoweth Papers, 1918-1941.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: FS 046
Walter W. Chenoweth
Walter W. Chenoweth

Walter W. Chenoweth, the founder of the Horticultural Manufactures Department in 1918, the predecessor to the Food Science Department, was a key figure in the development of research and education in modern food science. Hired as a pomologist at Mass. Agricultural College in 1912, Chenoweth had no background in food science, but encouraged by Frank A. Waugh and supported by Frederick Sears, he developed a course of study from scratch, learning and standardizing many of techniques himself while teaching. His curriculum and the processes he and his students developed for preserving food contributed to easing the food shortages brought on by World War I. Under the aegis of the new department, Chenoweth initiated a program in community food preservation, instructing students and members of the public in canning and other techniques. In 1929-1930, he loaned his services to the Grenfell Mission in Newfoundland, setting up canneries and teaching the methods of food preservation to would-be colonizers in Newfoundland and Labrador. Faced with a dearth of solid literature in the field, he published a textbook, Food Preservation (1930), which was a standard text for many years. The University named the Food Science building in Chenoweth’s honor after it was built in 1965. Chenoweth retired in 1941 and died four years later at the age of 75. .

The Walter Chenoweth Papers includes many of Chenoweth’s published works on canning and food preservation including his 1930 text, Food Preservation, as well as a typescript text called How to Preserve Food, eventually published by Houghton Mifflin in 1945. Also in the collection are clippings and memorabilia from Chenoweth’s trips to Newfoundland while working at the Grenfell Mission and a set of glass lantern slides.

Subjects

  • University of Massachusetts Amherst--Faculty
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst. Department of Food Science

Contributors

  • Chenoweth, Walter W. (Walter Winfred), 1872-

Children’s Aid and Family Services of Hampshire County Inc.

Children's Aid and Family Service Records, 1910-ca. 2001.

10 boxes (8 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 008

Agency providing traditional child and family service and extensive mental health services that worked closely with the SPCC, was a member in the Child Welfare League of America, and was the Northampton representative for the National Association of Travelers Aid Societies. Includes 10 versions of the constitution, typed personal recollections from the 25th anniversary, annual reports, minutes, and the correspondence of President Miriam Chrisman (1952-1957). Of special note, Mrs. Calvin Coolidge was the Chair of the Home Finding Committee of the Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children which helped to found the CAFS.

Subjects

  • Child mental health services--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Child welfare--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Children--Institutional care--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Coolidge, Grace Goodhue, 1879-1957
  • Floods--Massachusetts
  • Foster home care--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Franklin County (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Hampshire County (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Homeless children--Massachusetts--Franklin County--History
  • Homeless children--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Hurricanes--Massachusetts
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Intellectual life--History
  • Northampton (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Social service--Massachusetts--Hampshire County--History
  • Voluntarism--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Children's Aid Association (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Children's Aid and Family Service of Hampshire County (Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Children's Home Association (Franklin County, Mass. and Hampshire County, Mass.)
  • Chrisman, Miriam Usher
  • Massachusetts Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Home Finding Committee

Citizens for Participation in Political Action. Franklin and Hampshire Counties

CPPAX Franklin and Hampshire Chapter Records, 1991-1999.

2 boxes (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 558

Founded in 1962, the mission of Citizens for Participation in Political Action (CPPAX) was to increase citizen involvement in politics and policy making, and to promote social and economic justice both within the U.S. and globally through U.S. foreign policy. The Franklin and Hampshire Counties chapter of CPPAX has been active in a number of issues of both local and national significance.

Minutes of meetings, subject files, and newsletters reveal issues of importance to the local chapter of CPPAX, issues that include clean elections, peace, nuclear abolition, and health care.

Subjects

  • Activists--Massachusetts
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Peace movements--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Citizens for Participation in Political Action. Franklin and Hampshire Counties

Clark, Clarence Carroll

Clarence Carroll Clark Papers, 1909-1981.

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 393

Ordained as an Episcopal priest in 1911, Dr. Clark accepted the position of director of the Chapel of the Comforter in Greenwich Village, New York, a mission that abandoned its traditional Christian practices in favor of the teachings of theosophy. A prolific writer and lecturer, Clark stressed in his work the similarities between Eastern and Western religions, and emphasized his belief that unity among religions would bring about a spiritual re-awakening throughout the world. After serving as director of the Chapel of the Comforter for more than forty years, Clark retired in 1950.

Clark’s papers document his career as a professor of English, Episcopal priest, theosophist, and Director of the Chapel of the Comforter. Consisting of correspondence, lecture notes, and his writings, the collection chronicles his religious beliefs as well as his research on Emily Dickinson and her poetry.

Subjects

  • Dickinson, Emily, 1830-1886
  • Religion--United States
  • Theosophy

Contributors

  • Clark, Clarence Carroll

Clark, John G., d. 1972

John G. Clark Papers, 1960-1969.

3 boxes (3.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 499
John G. Clark and H. P. Hood milk truck
John G. Clark and H. P. Hood milk truck

With a life long interest in politics, John G. Clark of Easthampton, Massachusetts worked on a number of campaigns before running for office himself. He ran for state senator in 1958, but lost in the Democratic primary. Two years later he ran again, this time for state representative of the 3rd Hampshire District, and won. Clark served in the State House of Representative for eight years until he was appointed clerk of the district court in Northampton and chose not to run for reelection.

While this collection is small, it is packed with campaign materials, letters, position statements, speeches, and press releases that together offer a good sense of the political climate in Massachusetts during the 1960s, especially issues of local concern for Hampshire County. Four letters from a young neighbor written while serving in Vietnam provide a personal account of the war.

Subjects

  • Massachusetts--History
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--1951-
  • Vietnam War, 1961-1975

Contributors

  • Clark, John G., d. 1972

Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886

William Smith Clark Papers, 1814-2003 (Bulk: 1844-1886).

(14.75 linear feet).
Call no.: RG 003/1 C63
William Smith Clark
William Smith Clark

Born in Ashfield, Massachusetts, in 1826, William Smith Clark graduated from Amherst College in 1848 and went on to teach the natural sciences at Williston Seminary until 1850, when he continued his education abroad, studying chemistry and botany at the University of Goettingen, earning his Ph.D in 1852. From 1852 to 1867 he was a member of Amherst College’s faculty as a Professor of Chemistry, Botany, and Zoology. As a leading citizen of Amherst, Clark was a strong advocate for the establishment of the new agricultural college, becoming one of the founding members of the college’s faculty and in 1867, the year the college welcomed its first class of 56 students, its President. During his presidency, he pressured the state government to increase funding for the new college and provide scholarships to enable poor students, including women, to attend. The college faced economic hardship early in its existence: enrollment dropped in the 1870s, and the college fell into debt. He is noted as well for helping to establish an agricultural college at Sapporo, Japan, and building strong ties between the Massachusetts Agricultural College and Hokkaido. After Clark was denied a leave of absence in 1879 to establish a “floating college” — a ship which would carry students and faculty around the world — he resigned.

The Clark Papers include materials from throughout his life, including correspondence with fellow professors and scientists, students in Japan, and family; materials relating to his Civil War service in the 21st Massachusetts Infantry; photographs and personal items; official correspondence and memoranda; published articles; books, articles, television, and radio materials relating to Clark, in Japanese and English; and materials regarding Hokkaido University and its continuing relationship with the University of Massachusetts.

Subjects

  • Agricultural colleges--Japan--History
  • Agricultural colleges--Massachusetts--History
  • Agriculturists--Japan
  • Agriculturists--Massachusetts
  • Amherst (Mass.)--History
  • Amherst College--Faculty
  • Amherst College--Students--Correspondence
  • Hokkaido (Japan)--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Daigaku--History
  • Hokkaid¯o Teikoku Daigaku--History
  • Japan--Relations--United States
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o--History
  • Sapporo N¯ogakk¯o. President
  • T¯ohoku Teikoku Daigaku. N¯oka Daigaku--History
  • United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865
  • United States--Relations--Japan
  • Universität Göttingen--Students--Correspondence

Contributors

  • Clark, William Smith, 1826-1886
  • Massachusetts Agricultural College. President

Types of material

  • Drawings
  • Photographs
  • Realia
  • Scrapbooks

Collection policy

Frank Waugh's doves
Garden (white fan tailed doves in bird bath) by Frank Waugh, ca.1920

“… there must come vast social change in the United States; a change not violent, but by the will of the people certain and inexorable; carried out ‘with malice toward none but charity for all'; with meticulous justice to the rich and complete sympathy for the poor, the sick and the ignorant; with freedom and democracy for America, and on earth Peace, Good Will toward men.”

W.E.B. Du Bois, Chicago, June 29, 1951

In keeping with our mission, the Department of Special Collections and University Archives collects materials of enduring historical and cultural value relating to four major thematic areas: the history and experience of social change in America; the histories and cultures of New England with an emphasis on Massachusetts; innovation and entrepreneurship; and the broad community associated with the University of Massachusetts Amherst. Our collections are tightly integrated and span all formats, including personal papers and organizational records, books and periodicals, maps, photographs, audio and video recordings, and digital materials of all kinds, and they currently include over 35,000 printed items, approximately 30,000 linear feet of manuscript and archival materials, tens of thousands of photographs, and a burgeoning array of digital assets.

While not comprehensive, the following includes a brief synopsis of some of the primary focal points for SCUA’s collections:

Our approach to collecting

Following in the footsteps of W.E.B. Du Bois, we recognize the inherent interconnectedness of a broad range of issues in social justice and collect original materials that document the organizational, intellectual, and individual ties that unite disparate struggles for social equality, human dignity, and justice. In adopting social change as a primary collecting focus, we hope to move beyond viewing social and political movements in isolation and toward a vision that acknowledges the connections between and among them. Ultimately, we wish to lay a foundation for examining the larger histories of social engagement in America and the broader experience of social change that is difficult to encapsulate within a single social movement.

A distinctive feature of SCUA’s approach to collecting is our effort to include “whole lives and whole communities,” to provide a robust basis for interpreting the background of the persons and organizations we document, their influences, interests, and the communities in which they operate.

Social change

Emphasizing the cross-fertilization between several social movements and centers of activist energy, including peace, social and racial justice, agricultural reform, environmentalism, sustainability, labor activism, gay activism, antinuclear activism, and intentional communities, but branching out to include antifluoridation activism, campaigns for voting rights and clean elections, community and charitable organizations, and the history of revolutionary-era Europe (1789-1848).

  • African and African American history and culture: The history of race and ethnicity in America, with particular emphasis on the struggle for racial equality and social justice.
  • Agriculture, horticulture, botany: Including agricultural science and practice, horticulture, animal husbandry, natural history, organic farming, sustainable living, and heritage breeds.
  • Antinuclear movement: SCUA holds numerous collections documenting grassroots opposition to nuclear power and nuclear weaponry.
  • Arts management and arts administration:
    In partnership with the UMass Amherst Arts Extension Service, the National Endowment for the Arts, Americans for the Arts, and several other arts agencies, SCUA documents the history of arts administration in America. Collecting the records of state and national arts agencies, we will provide a foundation for research into the evolution of arts policy, strategies for supporting the arts, and the economic and cultural impact of the arts on our communities.
  • Cold War Culture: The culture of the Cold War, with an emphasis upon East Germany, Poland, and Yugoslavia. Among other areas, SCUA has a strong interest in the Solidarity movement and in partnership with the DEFA Film Library, in East German cinema and graphic arts.
  • Disability: Organizational records and collections of personal papers documenting the history of disability and disability rights in the United States.
  • Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, and Transgender issues: Materials relating to the history and experience of the LGBTQ community and liberation struggles.
  • Labor, work, and industry: Organized labor, industrialization, manufacturing, business history, and the experience and culture of labor and working people.
  • Peace: Materials relating to the peace and antiwar movements and non-violence, with an emphasis on New England.
Innovation and entrepreneurship

Materials that document innovative and entrepreneurial activities, and particularly social entrepreneurship. The collections in SCUA include the papers of Mark H. McCormack (a pioneer in sport and entertainment marketing), Carl C. Harris (inventor and President of Rodney Hunt Co.), and numerous collections that document our region’s distinctive history of innovation in manufacturing and technology.

New England history and culture

The social, political, cultural, intellectual, literary, and economic life, with an emphasis upon western New England. The department houses thousands of books on New England cookery, with a particular emphasis on charitable and community cookbooks and cookbooks and ephemera published by corporations and the food industry.

  • Cookery and culinary history
    SCUA has thousands of cookbooks and other materials on New England regional cuisine, including community and charitable cookbooks, commercial cookbooks by New England authors, corporate cookbooks, and culinary ephemera.
  • Literature and the arts
    Emphasizing poets and writers, playwrights, and the performing arts in New England.
  • Politics and political culture
    SCUA has rich collections documenting the history and politics of the Commonwealth, including the papers of Congressmen Silvio O. Conte and John Olver, State Senator Stanley Rosenberg, and State rep John Clark and the records of the Hampshire Council of Governments and several individual towns.
University Archives interests

Serving as the memory of the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the University Archives collects, preserves, and makes available official and non-official records documenting the policies, programs, facilities, and activities of the campus community, including its administration, departments and programs, faculty, and staff. The Archives also avidly collects materials that reflect the lives and experiences of its students and alumni.

SCUA makes an effort to document the histories of the entire UMass community. Our holdings include the comprehensive official records of the University since its founding in 1863, papers of faculty, staff, and students, official and unofficial publications, oral histories, and a wide range of other collections that reflect on our history as the Commonwealth’s land grant institution.

Other areas

SCUA has developed depth in a handful of other collecting areas, including:

  • American Study of Japan and Asia
    American relations with Japan from the Meiji period to the present, and connections with China and other Asian countries.
  • Protistology
    Records of the scholarly study of the protista (protozoans).

Concordance for the Archives, D

[ A ][ B ][ C ][ D ][ E ][ F ][ G ][ H ][ I, J ][ K ][ L ][ M ][ N ]
[ O ][ P, Q ][ R ][ S ][ T ][ U ][ V ][ W ][ XYZ ]

D

Dairy Control Series
see RG-15/2.2 Experiment Station (1888- )–Dairy Control Series (1914-1973)
Dairy Digest, Massachusetts
see Extension Service, Cooperative–Massachusetts Dairy Digest (1936-1985) RG-15/8
Dairy Farm
see Veterinary and Animal Science, Department of–Dairy Farm RG-25/V2
see also Farm (College of Food and Natural Resources) RG-15/7
Dairy Industry, Department of
see Stockbridge School of Agriculture (Two Year School) RG-15/5
Dames Club (1956)
RG-45/40/D3
Dance Department
see Music and Dance, Department of RG-25/M9
see also Hicks, Adeline RG-40/11
Dartmouth, UMass
see Southeastern Massachusetts University (SMU) RG-55/5
Data Bank, Information
see Information Data Bank (IDB) RG-30/2/4
Data Processing Center (DPC)
RG-35/7
Data Processing Center Newsletter (DPC) (1987-1993)
RG-35/7
Day Care Center
see Commuter Student Affairs–Day Care Center RG-30/25
Day School, University
see Nursery School RG-25/H9.5
Day Teacher Preparation Program
see Teacher Education, Center for–Day Teacher Preparation Program RG-13/3/21/5 and
RG-13/3/23/4
Deaf, Media Center for the (Northeast Regional)
see Media Specialists for the Deaf, Center for (School of Education) RG-13/3/21/9
Dean of Academic Support Services
see Academic Support Services, Dean of RG-30/4
Dean of Administration
see Vice Chancellor for Administrative Services RG-35/1
Dean of Students
RG-30/2
Dean of Students, Assistant
RG-30/2/1
Dean of Students–Student Personnel Administrative Council
RG-30/2
Dean of the College (MSC)
see Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost RG-6/1
Dean of Women
RG-30/3
see also Dean of Women, Helen Curtis (1902-1993) available online (Five College Archives Digital Access Project )
Deans Council; Provost’s Administrative Council; Academic Deans Meeting (1955-1977) RG-6/2
see also Campus Management Council (1984-1989) RG-6/2.5
Deans Meeting, Academic
see Deans Council; Provost’s Administrative Council; Academic Deans Meeting (1955-1977) RG-6/2
see also Campus Management Council RG-6/2.5
Debate (Communication Studies)
RG-25/C7.4
Debate Club
see Debate (Communications Studies) RG-25/C7.4
Debate Union Alumni Newsletter (1979-1982)
RG-25/C7.4/00
DEFA Film Library
see Deutsche Film Aktien- Gesellschaft (DEFA) Film Library (1998- ) RG-25G6.1
Degrees
see Enrollment, Degrees, Courses, Curriculum RG-1/206
see also Honorary Degrees RG-1/7/2
Degrees, Honorary Degrees
see Honorary Degrees (1927- ) RG-1/7/2
Delta Chi (1961- )
RG-45/90/D4
Delta Phi Alpha (1916- )
RG-45/90/D4.3
Delta Phi Gamma (1985)
RG-45/90/D4.6
Delta Sigma Phi (1995)
RG-45/90/D4.7
Delta Sigma Theta (1991-1992)
RG-45/90/D4.725
Delta Upsilon (1988-1989)
RG-45/90/D4.75
Delta Zeta
RG-45/90/D4.8
Democratic Socialists of America (DSA) (1989)
RG-45/80/D4
Democrats, University
see University Democrats RG-45/80/U6
Democrats, Young
see Young Democrats RG-45/80/Y6.2
Demographic Research Institute, Massachusetts
see Massachusetts Demographic Research Institute (Research and Graduate Studies) RG-9/10
Demography Group (1982- )
RG-40/3/D4
Demonstration Alcohol Education Project
RG-30/15/2/3
Demonstrations, Student Protests and
see Student Protests and Demonstrations RG-45/101
Dental Hygiene Committee (1962)
RG-40/2/D4
Departmental Activities (Photographs)
RG-160
Department Libraries
see Libraries Departmental (1880, 1958-1978) RG-8/3/11
Departments, Academic
see Academic Departments, Programs, Institutes, Centers RG-25
Deputy Chancellor
see Chancellor, Deputy RG-4/18
Design and Production (University Relations and Development)
RG-39/6
Designs for Effective Learning Cluster (School of Education)
RG-13/3/23
Deutsche Film Aktien-Gesellschaft (DEFA) Film Library (1998- )
RG-25/G6.1
Development Advisory Council (1969)
RG-40/2/D5
Development and Alumni Affairs
see Alumni Office (Office of Development and Alumni Affairs) RG-50/1
Development Council
see Development Advisory Council (1969) RG-40/2/D5
Development, University Relations and
see University Relations and Development RG-39
Devens, Fort
see Fort Devens (1946-1949) RG-55/1
DGK Fraternity (1875- )
RG-45/90/D5
DIAL
see Digital Image Analysis Laboratory (DIAL) RG-29/2
Digital Image Analysis Laboratory (DIAL)
RG-29/2
Digital Initiatives News (UMass Amherst Libraries) (1999- )
RG-8/00/D3
Digital Photographic Laboratory (Research and Graduate Studies)
RG-9/3/2
Dining Services (Campus Center, Student Union)
RG-37/2
Diploma
see Insignia, Diploma, Motto, Mascot, Mace, etc. RG-1/6
see also Diplomas (Printed materials, oversize) RG-184/6
Diplomas (Printed materials, oversize)
RG-184/6
Directions
see Handbook–Directions (Student Affairs) RG-30/00/2
Directories (Alumni)
RG-50/00/1
see also Directories, Mugbooks, Catalogs of Graduates, etc. (General Catalogs,
All-University Lists of Students) RG-1/00/5
Directories, Faculty and Staff
see Faculty/Staff Biography, Lists, Directories (Collective) RG-40/10
Directories, Mugbooks, Catalogs of Graduates, etc. (General Catalogs,
All-University Lists of Students) (1867- ) RG-1/00/5
see also Directories (Alumni) RG-50/00/1
Disability Services
see Handicapped Student Affairs, Office of (1973- ) RG-30/29
see also Abilities Unlimited (Student Interest Group) (1986- ) RG-45/40/A2
Disadvantaged Students Program
see CCEBMS RG-6/4/12
Disarmament Study Group (1981)
RG-40/3/D5
Discipline Board (Faculty Senate, 1965-1972)
RG-40/2/A3
Dispatches (1982) (School of Education)
RG-13/1
Dispute Resolution
see Center for Information Technology and Dispute Resolution (CITDR) (2001- ) RG-25/L7.5
Dissertations and Theses (Films and Videotapes)
see Theses and Dissertations (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/2
Dissertations, Doctoral
see Doctoral Dissertations (1911- ) RG-46/1
see also Theses and Dissertations (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/2
Distinguished Architecture (Physical Plant) (1966)
RG-36/50/D5
Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series
see Lectures (Faculty) RG-40/1/2
Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series (Films and Videotapes) (1986- ) RG-186/7
Distinguished Faculty Lecture Series Videotapes (1986- )
RG-186/7
see also Lectures (Faculty and Staff) RG-40/1/2
Chancellor’s Lecture Series (1975-1986) RG-186/1
Distinguished Teaching Awards
see Awards, Prizes RG-1/11
Distinguished Visitor’s Program (DVP) (1960-1996)
RG-45/50/D5
Diversity and Development, Center for
see Center for Diversity and Development (CDD) (1996- ) RG-45/80/C4
Diversity and Social Justice, Counsel on Community
see Counsel on Community, Diversity and Social Justice (1997) RG-4/17
Diversity Office, Equal Opportunity and
see Affirmative Action/Equal Opportunity and Diversity Office RG-4/7
Divine Light Club
see Divine Light Mission RG-45/70/D5
Divine Light Mission (Religious Group) (1973- )
RG-45/70/D5
Doctoral Dissertations (1911- )
RG-46/1 [see UMass Library catalog for holdings
see also Theses and Dissertations (Films and Videotapes) RG-186/2
Documents, Government (Library) (1955- )
RG-8/3/3
Donahue Institute
see Institute for Governmental Services (IGS), Donahue RG-3/8
Dormitory and Area Government
see Housing Services RG-32
DPC
see Data Processing Center (DPC) RG-35/7
Dr. Suess Club (1956)
RG-45/40/D7
Draft Counseling Services (1981)
RG-45/80/D7
Dramatic Society
see MAC Dramatic Society RG-45/40/M3
Drill Team, Equestrian
see Equestrian Drill Team RG-45/40/E6
Drop-Out Problem, Student
see Retention Committee–Student Drop-Out Problem (1985- ) RG-40/2/R5
Drug Drop-In Center
see Room to Move RG-30/10
Drum (1970-1988)
RG-45/00/D7
>> View online
DSA
see Democratic Socialist of America (DSA)
DTA
see Awards, Prizes (Distinguished Teaching Awards) RG-1/11
Du Bois Department of Afro-American Studies, W. E. B.
see Afro-American Studies, W.E.B. Du Bois Department of RG-25/A4
Duplicate Collection
RG-99
Duplicate Collection, Alumni Materials
RG-99/1
Duplicate Collection, Annual Reports (1863-1989)
RG-99/2
Duplicate Collection, Buildings and Grounds (Distinguished Architecture for a State University) (1966)
RG-99/3
Duplicate Collection, Catalogs (Bulletin Series) (1914- )
RG-99/4
Duplicate Collection, Chancellors Lecture Series (1974-1978)
RG-99/5
Duplicate Collection, Histories of Campus (1917, 1933, 1963)
RG-99/6
Duplicate Collection, The Index (1871- )
RG-99/7
Duplicate Collection, Missions and Goals, A Report of the Commission on (1976)
RG-99/8
Duplicate Collection, Stosag (Stockbridge School) (1961- )
RG-99/9
Duplicating (Administrative Services)
RG-35/9
Durfee Garden (Physical Plant) (1993- )
RG-36/104/D8
DVP
see Distinguished Visitors Program (DVP) RG-45/50/D5
Dyslexic Student Organization
see Communication Skills Center RG-6/4/15
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