Results for: “Hubbard, Jason, b. 1815” (38 collections)SCUA

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Binet, Maurice Emmanuel Hippolyte, 1877-

Maurice Emmanuel Hippolyte Binet Collection, 1784-1852 (Bulk: 1794-1814).

2 boxes (1 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 738

During the revolutionary era of 1789-1848, Belgium was ensnared in power politics on a continental scale, with all the drama and turbulence entailed. From the conquest of the region by French Republican forces under Napoleon in 1794 through the dissolution of French control in 1814, modern-day Belgium was divided into nine administrative departments, including the centrally-located Département de la Dyle, which included the key cities of Brussels, Louvain, and Nivelles.

Collected by Maurice Emmanuel Hippolyte Binet, this small collection of manuscripts is relatively tightly focused on the years of French Republican domination of Belgium (1794-1814), with a particular focus on the Département de la Dyle. The majority of the collection consists of letters received by the Central Administration in the Dyle, including letters to and from Napoleonic generals and French military hierarchy, civic authorities, administrators, and police. Many of the letters concern the challenges of asserting control over a subject population and the political fallout of the French Revolution, but the collection also reflects the greater tensions within a complex society changing rapidly during an age of revolution.

Subjects

  • Belgium--History--1794-1814
  • Brabant (Belgium)--History
  • Dyle (Belgium)
  • France--History--1789-1815
  • France--History--Revolution, 1789-1799
  • Napoleonic Wars--1800-1815
  • Police--France--18th century

Contributors

  • Lambrechts, Charles Joseph Matthieu, 1753-1823
  • Mallarmé, François René Augustin, 1755-1831

Types of material

  • Letters (Correspondence)

Brinley Family

Brinley Family Papers, 1643-1950.

(4.75 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 161
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729<br />Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)<br />after John Smibert
Deborah Brinley and infant son Francis, 1729
Copy by Charles U. Bond (1830)
after John Smibert

A prosperous family of merchants and landowners, the Brinleys were well ensconced among the social and political elite of colonial New England. Connected by marriage to other elite families in Rhode Island and Massachusetts — the Auchmutys, Craddocks, and Tyngs among them — the Brinleys were refined, highly educated, public spirited, and most often business-minded. Although many members of the family remained loyal to the British cause during the Revolution, the family retained their high social standing in the years following.

The Brinley collection includes business letters, legal and business records, wills, a fragment of a diary, documents relating to slaves, newspaper clippings, and a small number of paintings and artifacts. A descendent, Nancy Brinley, contributed a quantity of genealogical research notes and photocopies of Brinley family documents from other repositories. Of particular note in the collection is a fine nineteenth century copy of a John Smibert portrait of Deborah Brinley (1719), an elegant silver tray passed through the generations, and is a 1713 list of the library of Francis Brinley, which offers a foreshadowing of the remarkable book collection put together in the later nineteenth century by his descendant George Brinley.

Subjects

  • American loyalists--Massachusetts
  • Book collectors--United States--History--19th century
  • Brinley family
  • Brinley, George, 1817-1875--Library
  • Businessmen--Massachusetts--History
  • Businessmen--Rhode Island--History
  • Craddock family
  • Landowners--Massachusetts--History
  • Landowners--Rhode Island--History
  • Libraries--Rhode Island--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Massachusetts--Politics and government--19th century
  • Rhode Island--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Rhode Island--Genealogy
  • Rhode Island--Politics and government--19th century
  • Slavery--United States--History
  • Tyng family
  • United Empire Loyalists

Types of material

  • Deeds
  • Realia

Burnett, Bela, 1778-

Bela Burnett Account Book, 1801-1842.

1 vol. (0.25 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 385 bd

A storeowner, farmer, and citizen of Granby, Mass., Bela Burnett was born October 4, 1778, the second of seven children of Jonathan and Mehitabel (Dickinson) Burnett. Having relocated from Southampton, New York, to Battleboro, Vermont, in 1770, Jonathan and Mehitable settled in Granby in 1774, purchasing the farm of Aaron Nash where in 2010, Burnett descendants still live. Burnett had at least five children by two marriages, first to Clarissa Warner (1801) and second to Sally Allen (1808). Burnett died in Granby on April 16, 1846.

The Burnett account book includes careful records of goods sold, customers’ accounts, and the form and method of payment (cash, credit, or barter), as well as some information on family members and boarders, along with a handful of miscellaneous items laid in, such as calculations, notes, and a remedy for yellow jaundice.

Subjects

  • Agricultural laborers--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Barter--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Boardinghouses--Massachusetts--Granby--19th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Food prices--Massachusetts--Granby
  • General stores--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Granby (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Jaundice
  • Marsh, Tim A. P
  • Medicine--Formulae, receipts, prescriptions
  • Produce trade--Massachusetts--Granby--19th century
  • Robbins, Asa
  • Shopping--Massachusetts--Granby
  • Smith, David

Contributors

  • Burnett, Bela, 1778-

Types of material

  • Account books

Champion Family

Champion and Stebbins Family Account Books, 1753-1865.

8 vols. (2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 228

Account books from the Champion and Stebbins families of Saybrook, Connecticut and West Springfield, Massachusetts, who were involved in various businesses and professional activities. Includes lists of accounts by surname, services rendered, methods of payment, entries for treatments and remedies, lists of patients, and lists of banking activities. Volumes were kept by Reuben Champion (1720-1777), Jere Stebbins (1757-1817), and Reuben Champion, M.D. (1784-1865).

Subjects

  • African Americans--Massachusetts--West Springfield--History
  • Agriculture--Economic aspects--Massachusetts--History
  • Atwood, Elijah
  • Barter--Massachusetts--West Springfield
  • Champion family
  • Connecticut River Valley--Economic conditions--18th century
  • Farmers--Massachusetts--History
  • General stores--Massachusetts
  • Homeopathic physicians--Massachusetts
  • Homeopathy--Materia medica and therapeutics
  • Medicine--Practice--Massachusetts--History
  • Physicians--Massachusetts
  • Pottery industry--Massachusetts--History
  • Saybrook (Conn.)--History
  • Shipping--New England--History
  • Stebbins family
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--Economic conditions
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--History
  • West Springfield (Mass.)--Social conditions
  • Women--Massachusetts--History

Contributors

  • Champion, Reuben, 1727-1777
  • Champion, Reuben, 1784-1865
  • Stebbins, Jere, 1757-1817

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Daybooks

Clarke School for the Deaf

Clarke School for the Deaf Records, ca.1867-2010.

130 boxes (195 linear feet linear feet).
Call no.: MS 742

With a $50,000 grant from the philanthropist John Clarke, Gardiner Green Hubbard founded the Clarke Institution for Deaf Mutes in 1867, a school predicated on the importance of acquiring oral skills for children with hearing loss. Opened in Northampton, Mass., under the direction of Harriet B. Rogers, Clarke differed philosophically from schools such as the American School for the Deaf, where sign language was used for instruction, by stressing speech-reading and speech as the primary methods of communication. With notable supporters such as Alexander Graham Bell, Clarence W. Barron, and Calvin Coolidge and his wife Grace (a former teacher), the school became a pioneer in training teachers in auditory and oral methods and in recognizing the importance of early intervention and mainstreaming children into neighborhood schools. Working in partnership with Smith College, Clarke began offering a master’s degree in Education of the Deaf in 1962. Known as the Clarke Schools for Hearing and Speech since 2010, the school has opened additional campuses in Boston (1995), Jacksonville (1996), New York (1999), and Philadelphia (2001).

The records of the Clarke School offer rich documentation of the history of oral deaf education in the United States and insight into the experience of deafness in America. The collection includes extensive correspondence of school administrators and teachers, organizational materials, records of the school’s programs, and an essentially complete run of the school’s annual reports and other publications. An extensive set of genealogical and genetic records generated by the research staff at the school is restricted for 75 years from the date of creation.

Subjects

  • Deaf--Education
  • Deafness--Genetic aspects
  • Teachers of the deaf

Contributors

  • Alexander Graham Bell Association for the Deaf
  • Bell, Alexander Graham, 1847-1922
  • Coolidge, Grace Goodhue, 1879-1957

Types of material

  • Minutes (Administrative records)
  • Photographs

Colman, William, 1768-1820

William Colman Account Book, 1802-1822.

1 vol. (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 212 bd

Merchant and shoemaker from the Byfield Parish of Newbury, Massachusetts and Boscawen, New Hampshire. Includes accounts of the prices paid for shoemaking and agricultural labor, accounts of the men and women who worked for his father’s shoe store and factory, notes of who lived in the younger Colman’s home, a page mentioning his move to New Hampshire, and accounts of agricultural produce sales and exchange of farm labor.

Subjects

  • Agricultural wages--New Hampshire--History--19th century
  • Boscawen (N.H.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Boscawen (N.H.)--Rural conditions--19th century
  • Households--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Merchants--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Newbury (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century
  • Shoemakers--Massachusetts--Newbury--History--19th century
  • Shoes--Prices--Massachusetts--History--19th century

Contributors

  • Colman, William, 1768-1820

Types of material

  • Account books

Duane, Edward H.

Association for Gravestone Studies Collection

Edward H. Duane Collection, 1967-1992.

1 box (0.5 linear feet).
Call no.: PH 029

While working as caretaker for veterans’ graves in 1966, Edward H. Duane became concerned about the deterioration he saw affecting the older tombstones. A resident of Leicester and (after 1968) Paxton, Mass., Duane was employed for many years as a shipper for companies in nearby Worcester, but preserving the information on tombstones became his calling. Over the following years, he made hundreds of rubbings of New England tombstones, teaching the technique at workshops and classes throughout the region. Among other works, he was author of The Old Burial Ground, Rutland, Mass., 1717-1888 (1983).

The Duane Collection contains an array of materials used by Edward Duane in his stone rubbing workshops in the 1970s and 1980s, along with newsclippings and short publications on New England gravestones and gravestone preservation. Among other items is an early essay of his, “Old New England Headstone, 1668-1815″ (1967), accompanied by related correspondence from Allan Ludwig.

Subjects

  • Sepulchral monuments--Massachusetts

Contributors

  • Association for Gravestone Studies
  • Duane, Edward H

Types of material

  • Photographs
  • Rubbings

Enfield (Mass.)

Enfield (Mass.) Collection, 1800-1939.

8 boxes (4 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 010
Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915
Birdseye view of Enfield, ca.1915

Situated at the confluence of the east and west branches of the Swift River in western Massachusetts, Enfield was the largest and southernmost of the four towns inundated in 1939 to create the Quabbin Reservoir. Incorporated as a town in 1816, Enfield was relatively prosperous in the nineteenth century on an economy based on agriculture and small-scale manufacturing, reaching a population of just over 1,000 by 1837. After thirty years of seeking a suitably large and reliable water supply for Boston, the state designated the Swift River Valley as the site for a new reservoir and with its population relocated, Enfield was officially disincorporated on April 28, 1938.

The records of the town of Enfield, Mass., document nearly the entire history of the largest of four towns inundated to create the Quabbin Reservoir. The core of the collection consists of records of town meetings and of the activities of the town Selectmen, 1804-1938, but there are substantial records for the Enfield Congregational Church. The School Committee, Overseers of the Poor, the town Library Association, and groups such as the local chapter of the Daughters of the American Revolution and the Bethel Masonic Lodge.

Subjects

  • Enfield (Mass.)--History
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Politics and government
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Religious life and customs
  • Enfield (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--History
  • Quabbin Reservoir Region (Mass.)--Social life and customs
  • Women--Societies and clubs

Contributors

  • Daughters of the American Revolution. Captain Joseph Hooker Chapter (Enfield, Mass.)
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town)
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). Overseers of the Poor
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). Prudential Committee
  • Enfield (Mass. : Town). School Committee
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.)
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Auxiliary
  • Enfield Congregational Church (Enfield, Mass.). Women's Missionary Society

Types of material

  • Account books
  • Church records
  • Photographs
  • Sermons

Exhibits online

Tulip poplar leaves
Tulip poplar leaves
Photograph by Arthur Mange

Drawing upon the unique materials under their care, the staff of the Department of Special Collections and University Archives organize two exhibits a year in their reading room and work regularly with their colleagues in the general library to prepare other exhibits for display on the Lower Level of the W.E.B. Du Bois Library.

Exhibits online
Diana Mara Henry PhotographsPhotographer: DMH
Photographs from the collection of Diana Mara Henry
An exhibit by Chuck Abel.
Rhetoric or researchRhetoric or Research
interprets student protests against CIA recruitment at UMass Amherst during the 1980s through a selection of images taken by student photojournalists.
By Tom Hohenstein (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
Gordon HeathSource, History, Story: Teaching U.S. History in the Archives
A digital curriculum for teaching U.S. history using archival resources.
An exhibit by Emily Oswald (ETHIR recipient, 2011).
I see dead peopleBehold And See As You Pass By
An online exhibit on gravestones and mortuary art in Early New England drawn from the Association for Gravestones Studies Collections.
By Molly Campbell (ETHIR recipient, 2011)
Robot readerUncertain Futures
Science fiction readership in the Cold War and beyond.
An exhibit by Morgan Hubbard.
Letters homeFifteen letters
Conrad D. Totman’s letters home from Korea, 1954-1955.
An exhibit by Alex McKenzie.
Du Bois photographsDu Bois: The Activist Life
An online exhibit on the life and legacy of W.E.B. Du Bois based on his papers.
A scarab beetleHerbals and Insects
A selection of rare botanical and entomological books from the SCUA collections.
A beeApiculture and culture
Books on bees and beekeeping.
An exhibit by Richard A. Steinmetz.

Gillett, Chauncey S.

Chauncey S. Gillett Daybook, 1841-1845.

1 vol. (0.2 linear feet).
Call no.: MS 417 bd

Although poorly known, Chauncey S. Gillett (1815-1846) appears to have carried on a relatively small custom at a general store in Southwick, Massachusetts, during the early 1840s. The son of Almon and Cinthia Gillett, Gillett traded in the typical range of groceries, dry goods, and other commodities, including buttons, cloth, paper, tobacco and tea, molasses, and candles, but also in liquors of various sorts (rum, gin, and brandy cider). Gillett died at the age of 30 on January 4, 1846, and is buried in Southwick.

Kept by the young Chauncey Gillett, this daybook records a chronological series of transactions at a general stores in Southwick, Mass., between 1841 and 1845. Among Gillett’s customers were several relatives, including Almon, Rhodolphus, and Levi Gillett, all of whom are also buried in the Southwick cemetery.

Subjects

  • General stores--Massachusetts--Southwick
  • Southwick (Mass.)--Economic conditions--19th century

Contributors

  • Gillett, Chauncey S

Types of material

  • Daybooks
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